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Discussion Starter #1
Okay... got some japanese grass shrimp.... and have done a ton of searches online, but can't find out if they can breed in fully fresh water or if they are the kind that need brackish/salt for the babies????????

Got a couple with eggs, so would love to raise the little buggers. :icon_wink
 

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From what I understand this shrimp is from the ghost shrimp family? If so it probably breeds in freshwater ;)
 

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From what I understand this shrimp is from the ghost shrimp family? If so it probably breeds in freshwater ;)
Family Palaemonidae includes Macrobrachium, Palaemonetes, and Palaemon, so there are no intrinsic guarantees there.

If your shrimp do not include any juvenile Macrobrachium, then they're probably Palaemon paucidens (of a different genus than U.S. ghost shrimp), a species which the literature indicates as having at least partially abbreviated larval development -- in freshwater.

Please post an image.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Will try to get a good shot of one today.
 

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Family Palaemonidae includes Macrobrachium, Palaemonetes, and Palaemon, so there are no intrinsic guarantees there.

If your shrimp do not include any juvenile Macrobrachium, then they're probably Palaemon paucidens (of a different genus than U.S. ghost shrimp), a species which the literature indicates as having at least partially abbreviated larval development -- in freshwater.

Please post an image.
Alrighty, that's why I always say "probably" in my posts, I'm still not very experienced with shrimp lol:proud:
 

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Discussion Starter #6


This is the shrimp in question. Right now they are a little bigger than an amano.
 

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I'm pretty certain they have a FW larval stage. They look VERY VERY VERY similar to the "ghost" shrimp we get up here, but that is the taiwan variety not the japanese...

So Give them some time! I found that lots and lots of moss helped me breed Ghosts easy so the Lava had a place to hide and eat stuff...

Let us know what happens!

-Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Cool, as you can see they are jammed in a thick wad of java, so if they hatch some babies hopefully some will make it.

Thanks.
 

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I agree, from what I have seen (pictures) it looks like a regular ghost shrimp (glass, grass etc.). But many other members somehow notice differences in body shape, small pigmentation differences etc. lol:icon_conf
 

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I agree, from what I have seen (pictures) it looks like a regular ghost shrimp (glass, grass etc.). But many other members somehow notice differences in body shape, small pigmentation differences etc. lol:icon_conf
Well the Taiwan strain that is common as Ghost shrimp or feeders usually has red bands around the antennae and the larger claws so it's easy to tell that they're probably a different variety but the same genus I believe. (it's genus right?)

-Andrew
 

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Well the Taiwan strain that is common as Ghost shrimp or feeders usually has red bands around the antennae and the larger claws so it's easy to tell that they're probably a different variety but the same genus I believe. (it's genus right?)

-Andrew
Oh I see, I am sure I too will start too notice these differences in species once I start getting more variety.:icon_eek:
 

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Well the Taiwan strain that is common as Ghost shrimp or feeders usually has red bands around the antennae and the larger claws so it's easy to tell that they're probably a different variety but the same genus I believe. (it's genus right?)

-Andrew
The feeder ghost shrimp sold within the United States are invariably native Palaemonetes spp. distinct from any Taiwanese species.
 

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Chris did you get those from Premier ? I had a couple of them for about a week then returned them because I watched one of them grab a fish and try to eat it but luckily the fish got away after about 5 seconds.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yup... that is them, but since we had a smaller 'ghost' grab a baby fish before, we were prepaired and put them in a container all by them selves.

We have had the kind with the orange bands before, and they frequently had eggs, but never babies, so we think they were the kind that need brackish-salt for their babies.

These do not have the orange bands at all, and have a good bit more color veins and tint. Also, they are a bit larger than the 'ghosts' we had before.
 

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Just saying, to probably note differences, the shrimp that i have been raising, that were started from a few "feeder" ghost shrimp have red bands on their aentena. I bred them and raised a few young in fresh water.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I was told once, that there are two varieties of 'ghost' that look the same (even with the red bands) and that one is fully fresh-water, and the other needs brackish for their babies.

Of course I could have been given bad information... there is so much out there, it is hard to know what is right and not.
 

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The feeder ghost shrimp sold within the United States are invariably native Palaemonetes spp. distinct from any Taiwanese species.
Veneer. I'm really confused on this and will have to do more research before I give a deffinate answer, and I'm on break this week so hopefully I'll have some time. I didn't think that we had any FW Dwarf shrimp in the USA and another site said that they're from Taiwan but then I found another site saying the same shrimp is from NE coastal waterways which would make them brackish, so I'm extremely confused. Here are the two sites I'm referring to:

brackish-Google Image Result for http://omp.gso.uri.edu/doee/biota/inverts/arthro/shrshrm.jpg

FW?: Freshwater Inverts

We have had the kind with the orange bands before, and they frequently had eggs, but never babies, so we think they were the kind that need brackish-salt for their babies.

These do not have the orange bands at all, and have a good bit more color veins and tint. Also, they are a bit larger than the 'ghosts' we had before.
I can gaurentee you that the ones I HAD did breed in FW. I'm not sure if it's true that there are FW and SW shrimp that look exactly the same though so I can't really help there at the moment.

Just saying, to probably note differences, the shrimp that i have been raising, that were started from a few "feeder" ghost shrimp have red bands on their aentena. I bred them and raised a few young in fresh water.
I raised the same ones. Completely in FW.

-Andrew
 

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No, the ghost shrimp employed as feeders in the U.S. are native to eastern North American drainages (see Figure 1). Elsewhere in the world, certain species of the same genus (Palaemonetes) inhabit freshwater habitats; yet others are restricted to more saline conditions. Of these, multiple species of brackish-to-marine Palaemonetes are also native to the U.S. (for instance, P. pugio and P. vulgaris).


Ecology and Classification of North American Freshwater Invertebrates (James H. Thorp, Alan P. Covich)

The Taiwan ghost shrimp sold on FreshwaterInverts, which apparently undergo partially abbreviated larval development in freshwater, are either a species of Palaemonetes or members of another Palaemonid genus (Palaemon or Macrobrachium). Without specimens on hand, it's difficult to make a more specific determination.

I'll have more on the native shrimp of the U.S. shortly.
 

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Thats really really interesting Veneer! I didn't know that we had much in the FW shrimp department here in the USA I knew we had Crays though..

I think your right:)


-Andrew

Oh and BTW are you the same person as at shrimpnow.com?
 
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