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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I was in the mountains this weekend :)



and I have found a couple of rocks :icon_eek: who I want to use in my second

iwagumi :icon_roll attempt.

I ask you all my friends to judge the rocks and give me a bit of advice.

because at first i wash them with water after I make the vinegar test

with vine vinegar and it was no bubbling at all, so i decided it's aquarium

safe, but after a good brushing and pouring some acetic acid ( industrial

vinegar :icon_roll ) on it. i got a lot of bubling, :mad: they look like marble and the

dark and black thinghs are pietrified ancient snail shells :).



Some one will tell my I can use them in a iwagumi ( I want to break the

big piece in two if the rocks are good ) or leave them like that

and use for room decoration purposes? :confused1:

U can use this kind of rock in a aquarium or they are backdrawns???



One or two of the little pieces had little rust spots on the side, it's that bad or goodi think the get some iron in proximity and the rust get on them?

If i will use only plants and no fish in the aquarium at all I can use them?




:fish:




 

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very cool looking rocks!!! nice pic of the mountains also. i'm no help with your actual question tho. only thing i can tell you is the rocks are sedimentary. i must have stayed awake during that 5th grade science class!
 

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Wow, those are really cool looking. If you are unsure about using them, just stick them in a bucket and wait a few weeks. Test the water the first day, a week or so in, and after that, if you get a significant change, you may want to reevaluate. I have used vinegar and muiratic acid in the past. On some occasions the vinegar has been too week and I had hardness issues and the acid has been too strong and I found I had very little hardness with them. This, to me, is more telling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I wouldn't break the rock. Never break the rock!
But the big one si about 15" long :) and the small ones are 4" to 6 " long and I only have found 4 pieces .

to split the big one in half with a ratio I don't know but like they split diamonds i will do it:confused1: some how...

he he he..and I need impair number of stones for a good job ....:icon_cry: no?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
As my friends here sugested today I started the monitoring of my rocks ....

for exact 3 weeks!!!

I know i'm not a pacient man.....

he he he

time will tell the truth about them .....

Just takes patience like everything else in this hobby.

some here can time travel? lol

:)
 

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don't overestimate the size of the hardscape in the final layout. Depending on how you position things, and your substrate, up to 5" of the rock can be underground. This leaves you with a 10" rock. Most foregroud plants get up to at LEAST 1" in height where they meet the hardscape. This leaves you with a 9" rock. If you use Blyxa Japonica to soften the hardscape, it often gets up to 4/5" between trimmings, leaving you with only a few inches of your largest stone protruding above the plants...

All I'm saying is there are definitely ways to minimize the sheer size of the stone if you think it's too large, but personally, I'd show it off instead. You always need a "main" stone to be the strong focal point. Accentuate it. It's a strength. :D

I'd go lookin' for more if I were you to add to what you've got. If that's not an option, then you can split it, but try to get small pieces off of the large rock and keep a good chunk intact to use as a focal stone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Bump!

not sign of bad things in there

yes i know i'm evil even to put these ramshornsnails in there with the rocks
 

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I would not use them. Im no rock expert but they dont look like one rock. They look like shells being held together by sand or some kind of sediment. That type of rock will harden water at a higher rate than denser rock. Also the patern on the rock does not look natural. Stones for an Iwagumi usually look like miniature mountain formations. Nice rocks though but in my opinion they are not ideal Iwagumi stone. Hope I don't come on harsh or arogant, its just my honest opinion.:thumbsup:
 
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