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So I bought a "bristlenose pleco" last night which looked okay from about a foot away, since as far as I can tell spots are part of their normal coloration. My tank is about three months old, so still fairly new, and I decided to just place him in the tank once he acclimated since all my other fish came from the same store and as far as I can tell had all been under the same filtering system. Although, my other fish had been in there several weeks already (And yes, I'm kicking myself now). Once I released him he stuck to the glass immediately in front of me and I noticed tiny protrusions all over his skin, as you can see in the picture (He's about and inch and a half long from tip to tip). I wasn't sure if those were part of his natural skin texture since he's a bristlenose (Though I don't see any bristles at all on his snout...) or if he had ich. Went to sleep, woke up, kind of freaked out about it and removed him from the tank and he's now sitting in an old half gallon betta tank. In summation, he was in the tank for a total of about 12-14 hours. Is this actually ich? If so, what measures should I take now that they've been exposed? I'm in the process of raising the temperature, but should I just wait to see if they become infected before I take any medicinal risks? Other inhabitants include several plants, a dozen neon tetras, two Otos, a golden apple snail, and my pride and joy, a one-eyed Buenos Aires tetra we call "The Governor."

TL;DR version: Is this ich or normal for a "bristlenose pleco?" If it is ich, he was in my community tank approximately 12-14 hours before I removed him this morning. What preventative measures should I take to keep my other fish from becoming infected? I'm currently in the process of upping the temperature. Should I wait before doing this or any other treatments? Should I hold off on the temp raising until I know any of them are infected?

 

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1 tbsp salt per 1 gallon US is a safe dose. Also raise the temp, but not over the highest safe temp for your fish (in other words, don't cook your fish).

It is hard to tell from the belly shot if it is Ich. I do see white spots on his fins too, and for me, that says ICH...but I've never owned a bristlenose before.

Hoping it isn't...

Lori
 

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that does not look like ich, ich looks like salt grains not raised like that. some of the spots are just his normal color but im not sure what the raised areas are. im betting on some kind of parasite. the salt treatment should work for those as well but you might post on planetcatfish.com also just to be on the safe side.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the info guys. I'll definitely drop by PlanetCatfish.com and see what they think. The spots are definitely yellow, not white. I tried raising the temp just four degrees today, from 72 to 76. My neons lost virtually all their color by the time I got home and my Buenos Aires tetra is swimming kinda wonky near the top. I had intended to put a small dose of salt, about two teaspoons per 10 gallons, but after seeing how stressed they are at a four degree change, I'm hesitant to do anything now but wait it out to see if any of them actually start developing it before trying anything else. :/ And I did spend a good portion of today scrounging up equipment for a quarantine/hospital tank today, so I never repeat this stupid stumble.
 

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Don't do anything more than a 2 degree change in 24 hours. Wait till they calm down a bit and do the salt and maybe some Paraguard.
I have never seen ich that looked like that. Try pulling your Pleco to the surface and use a sterilized needle to pull one of those open. See if a fluke is inside. If so it is possibly Clinostomum.

Have you gotten any plants / snails from north american waters?
 
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