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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got 20 of these shrimp in my 55-gallon planted tank, and although the shopkeeper agreed with my saying that it is Amano shrimp, he was not entirely sure, now that I have known about ghost shrimp I am confused about which one it is.

Can someone help identify if it is Amano shrimp or ghost shrimp or something else?


Insect Water Arthropod Parasite Invertebrate



Plant Water Terrestrial plant Organism Aquatic plant



Plant Terrestrial plant Natural landscape Groundcover Wood
 

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Please begin posting in proper areas of the forum so your threads don't have to be moved and so they don't get flagged in our system. Moved this to the shrimp section for you.

as ghost shrimp breeds that's cool
There are more than a dozen (nearly 20) different species of "Ghost Shrimp" and not all of them can reproduce in freshwater. Though, none of these appear to be any variety of Ghost Shrimp. It's tough to tell the species from the photos. Can you get clearer photos to share so we may do better at helping you identify them?

The shrimp in the second photo is not Amano, as suggested by @Skar. It's likely a Neocaridina davidi or Caridina babaulti. But again, tough to be certain without a clearer picture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I will reply to this post with some clearer images, but for now, they are hidden and almost impossible to locate, but a point I forgot to mention, I got them at a ridiculously cheap price from the shopkeeper, at approx $0.05 per piece, if it helps to narrow down the options a bit.

As per my knowledge, various varieties of shrimp on the internet are quite expensive ranging from $1 - $10 minimum, so ya, these shrimp of mine are quite cheap.
 

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I got them at a ridiculously cheap price from the shopkeeper, at approx $0.05 per piece, if it helps to narrow down the options a bit.
Unfortunately doesn't help identify them. But it definitely proves you got an absolutely terrific deal on some cool shrimp.

Hopefully they end up reproducing for you so you have a tank full of them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Wooh ! today something very unexpected happened, I searched in my sump for some shrimps(as they occasionally fall into its sponge section) to respond in this post with some pictures, I picked 1 female and 1 male out and found this:

Liquid Automotive lighting Fluid Rim Gas


Look on the left, there is a small baby shrimp(I have never seen it before) so definitely, it's not Amano.


I am so happy that I will eventually have a tank full of shrimps, the exact species of them is still unclear though, now it might narrow down the options.



One more suggestion I need: they seem to like my sump too much, and they keep falling in it, should I be worried to pick them up every time?

Some more pics:
 

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I’m not super familiar with how sump filters work, I just have a hang on back, but if there is an intake tube you can put a intake sponge on it so nothing big can get in. Even with my intake sponge though I have found baby shrimp in my HOB , but never adult ones.
 

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One more suggestion I need: they seem to like my sump too much, and they keep falling in it, should I be worried to pick them up every time?
Yes, you obviously need to cover any filtration intakes with sponge or netting small enough to prevent tiny shrimp (plural) from getting through.

Forum members will likely be able to help you determine the best ways to cover your filtration intake if you post photos of the area you need to cover. It's usually really cheap and easy to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yes, you obviously need to cover any filtration intakes with sponge or netting small enough to prevent tiny shrimp (plural) from getting through.

Forum members will likely be able to help you determine the best ways to cover your filtration intake if you post photos of the area you need to cover. It's usually really cheap and easy to do.

Sure, here is the intake, it has a plastic thingy to prevent my guppies, etc. from falling its small enough to prevent slightly grown-up guppy and molly fries from falling, and its surrounded by floater plants to add further protection, that's why I thought, maybe the shrimp kind of likes the sump sponge:

Plant Leaf Terrestrial plant Twig Trunk



Plant Botany Rectangle Water Pet supply


See on left it is barely accessible to the fish




Here is the outlet (I have made some space so the shrimp do not die in the sump if they fall):
Wood Gas Composite material Stain Building material
 

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Looking closer at their body shape and size they do look like Neocaridina to me.
I agree. It's my understanding that the various colored shrimp currently popular in the hobby started out as feeders, but then some people started breeding them for color. I believe these are some of the "wild types" that still pop up in colored varieties, or possibly from someone mixing colors (which results in a relatively high percentage of brown and/or colorless shrimp).
 

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It's my understanding that the various colored shrimp currently popular in the hobby started out as feeders, but then some people started breeding them for color.
Feels like a good opportunity for me to do a brain dump.

Shrimp have been kept as a feature in aquariums throughout Asia and the pacific since aquariums started becoming a thing. Not just as feeders, surprisingly. They've been documented in China since at least 3,000 years ago - that's just what we know about - and there are heavy suggestions that they've been kept there for more than 4,500 years, just as long as the goldfish. Shrimp (the kind we keep as hobbyists) were often farmed as a food source and kept in ornamental ponds until large ceramic fish bowls started growing in popularity around the 10th century. Similar practices occurred throughout Southeast Asia, across the Indian sub-continent and the pacific. Even in what we know today as the Hawaiian archipelago and other parts of Polynesia (think Halocaridina rubra.)

Like with most things, cultural practices have been cannibalized and claimed by colonizers. Combine that with a heavy dose of European and American erasure and shrimp keeping gets mythologized into seeming like a relatively new practice.

Selective breeding for color has always been part of the hobby across species. When it was re-popularized in Europe (and a bit later in North America) several decades ago, selective breeding just became more necessary than in other parts of the world because it was difficult to obtain stock.

And here we find ourselves today with unprecedented bounty and a worldwide collective knowledge base with this fun hobby.

(I love nerding out about this stuff.)
 

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I got 20 of these shrimp in my 55-gallon planted tank, and although the shopkeeper agreed with my saying that it is Amano shrimp, he was not entirely sure, now that I have known about ghost shrimp I am confused about which one it is.

Can someone help identify if it is Amano shrimp or ghost shrimp or something else?


View attachment 1049028
[...]
This one looks like the ghost shrimp that are easily available here in South America:
 

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This one looks like the ghost shrimp that are easily available here in South America:
They're not ghost shrimp or Macrobrachium jelskii.

Also important to keep in mind that there are nearly 20 species of "ghost shrimp" available in the hobby - even in your region.
 
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