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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everybody,

I was in Walmart today buying some school supplies and wondered into the electronic section and just glanced at the cameras and found this: http://www.fujifilm.com/products/digital_cameras/s/finepix_s2950/

I was impressed with how cheap it was, only $199, and I've found it even cheaper online. My question is do you think this is well suited for aquarium pictures? I want to try and take some nice pics of my aquarium, and my current camera isn't the best; not to mention it is about 4 years old. I don't know exactly what I am looking for in a camera as far as taking good quality pics of an aquarium; I've heard that a good macro and a high ISO rating are good, and this camera seems to have both.

I'm curious on what your input is! Thanks for the help!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
looks good. can you add a macro lens to it?
I'm not sure that you can. I did a quick google search about it and couldn't find any info on that. But the macro focus on the camera is 2cm, which seems pretty good... Again, I'm not very versed in camera stuff, so thanks for the help!
 

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I use a Nikon d3100 and use fast shutter speeds too capture moving objects
 

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You should be fine with that to get some pretty good shots, both full tank and macros. Anything moving most important variable is light. So whenver you can add external light it will in general increase your pic quality.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the help guys! I appreciate it!
 

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You really don't need a ridiculously expensive camera. So long as you can take macro, adjust the shutter speed and some basic functions most of the newer digital cameras will do just fine. Having the nicer add-ons like lenses and such are great for professional quality pics but really knowing how to use the camera and composition goes a long way.

Nice camera. Buy it, take some pics and if you don't like it.. well, box it and return it.
 

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I have an older Fuji Finepix P&S. Its a decent all around camera but it takes really poor pics indoors or in lower light situation. If you are taking pics in your tank when the lights are on you might be fine but you never know.

Don't let the fact that this P&S looks like a SLR, its not. It just has a bigger lens so you can zoom better but remember you can rarely take a Macro shot while zoomed in.

If you want a great camera that will last you 20 years and take any shot you want practically check out the Nikon d3100.

http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-D3100-Digital-18-55mm-3-5-5-6/dp/B003ZYF3LO

The wife and I purchased one a few months back and after using it is unbalievable how worthless P&S cameras are in comparison. I look at it this way, you (most people) will buy a new P&S camera every couple of years or so. So if you do the math you only have to go out 6-7 years and then you will have invested as much as the nicer Nikon/Canon SLR's cost. Your pictures will be much better and you wont have to replace it for many many years.

Just a thought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have an older Fuji Finepix P&S. Its a decent all around camera but it takes really poor pics indoors or in lower light situation. If you are taking pics in your tank when the lights are on you might be fine but you never know.

Don't let the fact that this P&S looks like a SLR, its not. It just has a bigger lens so you can zoom better but remember you can rarely take a Macro shot while zoomed in.

If you want a great camera that will last you 20 years and take any shot you want practically check out the Nikon d3100.

http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-D3100-Digital-18-55mm-3-5-5-6/dp/B003ZYF3LO

The wife and I purchased one a few months back and after using it is unbalievable how worthless P&S cameras are in comparison. I look at it this way, you (most people) will buy a new P&S camera every couple of years or so. So if you do the math you only have to go out 6-7 years and then you will have invested as much as the nicer Nikon/Canon SLR's cost. Your pictures will be much better and you wont have to replace it for many many years.

Just a thought.
Thanks for the info. That Nikon looks like a great camera; it's a bit out of my price range however. Although, you are probably right, it would pay for itself later on down the line.
 

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Even an intermediate camera with a good variety of options and a decent lens will get you far. Remember, a $2500 camera is a POS if you can't take a good picture and you don't know how to use it well. Stick with what you have, learn to master it and take the very best pictures you can with it. Once you have a command of composition, lighting techniques and some knowledge in manipulating the image outside of the camera in a program you should think about stepping up. I know a few people with insane camera gear that take pictures that look like an organ grinders monkey high on Red Bull was on the loose taking pictures.
 

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All i have are your standard point and shoot digital cameras.
I find that the best way to take really tight macro shots is to use a tripod and the timmer. That way there is no camera movement when the shot is taken. It would be difficult if you're trying to capture a fish but a shrimp will usually stay long enough.
 

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High ISO rating isnt necessary, the higher the sensitivity the more noise. You wanna set the ISO low as necessarily possible, unless your after a grainy effect.

What you want in a P&S is manual focus, fast shutter speeds/adjustable aperture and a good macro lens.

A P&S camera can be powerful if you know how to tweak the right settings.
 

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Being in the high speed photography business, we shoot pictures on roller coasters in amusement parks, I think most of the advice given is very good. One thing that is missing for this camera is an easy way to trigger a remote flash. Lighting is much more important than most people realize and the ability to trigger a flash off camera will really improve your pictures.

My preference would be an older DSLR that you can buy cheap from someone that has upgraded to the latest version and spend the money on a good lens and external lighting. This keeps you from replacing the $199 camera because it won't do what you want, As long as you stay with the same family of cameras, ie Nikon or Canon then the lenses and flashes you purchase can always move with you to the next camera.

The biggest issue I have with most ps camera is shutter lag. I shoot allot of pictures diving and it is very frustrating pushing the button to have the animal move before the camera takes the picture. I have not shot many pictures of my tank but I can see the similarities and challenges just like underwater photography. I would love to shoot a DSLR underwater but the additional housing costs have kept that out of the budget.

Just me 2 cents worth and you are being overcharged at that:icon_smil
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks for all the info guys! So what is a good shutter speed to have? I have also noticed with my current camera that the shutter speed is very slow--tried to take some pics of my tetras the other day and by the time the camera takes the photo the fish is long gone!
 

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Shutter speed will be very slow if you are in a low light setting. This is because the camera is trying to collect as much light as possible. So you really cant do anything to help that if I am thinking correct. If you speed the shutter up in a low light setting your pick will be very dark or even black and in a high light setting if you slow it down your pic will be too light or even just white.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Shutter speed will be very slow if you are in a low light setting. This is because the camera is trying to collect as much light as possible. So you really cant do anything to help that if I am thinking correct. If you speed the shutter up in a low light setting your pick will be very dark or even black and in a high light setting if you slow it down your pic will be too light or even just white.
Taking a pic with the aquarium light on I would think would be enough light, or no??
 
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