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Hello all, I have a 90 gallon with 1 Amazon Sword, 4 Anubias, 3 Crypts, 1 Marimo ball, 1 Corkscrew Val, 2 Dwarf Subulatas, and 1 Dwarf Lily. I have 3, 48" T-8 light tubes over it with a total wattage of 96W. I use tap water (hard and alkaline) and dose only Seachem Flourish as per the bottle directions. Would Co2 benefit me? Ive read about Flourish Excel, but it seems that pressurized co2 is the cheaper route in the long run. Is co2 even needed on this tank? Ive also been battling blue/green algae for @ 8 months now too. Would pressurized co2 help with that?

Thanks,
Patrick
 

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Im new to the planted tank two, i had co2 running on my tank for 3 months, until the tank ran out. The plants seemed to really like it, and grew quick. I havnt noticed much difference now without co2. I did use 1" eco complete for 1" substrate. I havnt dosed any fert because i was having problems with algea 2. I had blue/green algea two and had to use maracyne to get rid off it, it cost me 40$ to treat my tank for a week, but it worked. Hope that helps a little.
 

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With your rather low lighting conditions, CO2 is not an absolute requirement. However, even in low light settings, CO2 will benefit plants.

For sure, Flourish Excel would not be an economical way to go in a 90g tank, as the dosing would get expensive very quickly. Pressurized CO2 may have a higher initial cost, but the maintenance cost afterwards is very cheap.

(A stable) CO2 (level) will also help with BGA.

Also as ktm4us6 mentioned, it is possible to fight off BGA with erythromycin, but unless you address the root case of the bacteria, it will come back.
 

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Remove any active carbon elements in your filter. Use erythromycin at 250 ppm active element for 5 days with 50% water change before application on each day to eradicate your BGA. Increase the water movement in tank so that your plants sway a little. Dose lightly with potassium nitrate after routine weekly water changes (after eradication of BGA). Your problems should disappear and you will not need any CO2.
 

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I agree with Darkblade, adding a stable source of CO2 would benefit your tank even though it's fairly low light.

What's the circulation like in your tank?

Erythromycin and Excel will both help to reduce the cyanobacteria. Give your gravel and filter a good cleaning and start dosing Excel until the bottle's gone. You should see some good results from that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I agree with Darkblade, adding a stable source of CO2 would benefit your tank even though it's fairly low light.

What's the circulation like in your tank?

Erythromycin and Excel will both help to reduce the cyanobacteria. Give your gravel and filter a good cleaning and start dosing Excel until the bottle's gone. You should see some good results from that.
The circulation is good its been recently improved to 1000gph. The gravel have been recently replaced (4 days ago) with a different type as I thought that it may have been the culprit of the BGA. I have never had it until I used that gravel. There were some other things that I changed then too, so Im not positive its the old gravel. The new gravel within hours had bga growing on it in multiple spots but it has since disappeared. The BGA continues to grow on the plants and the glass.

Regarding co2, How would I know that I have the right amount for this lower light tank? Im confused on how to figure the amount of co2 necessary in a tank. The controllers and drop checkers are all ph based (I think) and so, would a tank with lower ph water to start with take less co2 to achieve the desired color in a drop checker (or number on a controller)? Would a tank with high ph need more co2 to achieve the green color in a drop checker?:icon_conf

Thanks guys,
Patrick
 

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Your water quality does make a diference on co2, and how much you need to lower ph for the plants, I was adding co2 with my water wich is ph 8.2 and it took alot of bubbles per second to even get it at ph 7.5. I started using ro/di filter and also with the tank maturing, i now can get ph below 7.0 pretty easy. As i said before, im new at this two. I havnt worried about testing co2 levels in my tank, i just watch ph and look at the plants to see if there growing or look healthy. If using co2 make small ajustments and see how your plants and fish react, what you dont want is constant up and down ph. I never had good luck with plants in the past, but with me switching to metal halide, co2, and eco complete substrate, my plants are really growing. the only problem ive had is algea problems, but figuring that out now two. I hope this helps.
 
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