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Dear All,

I am currently looking for options which will help to hide all/most of the equipment. This can be done in two ways as you already may guess: One option is "physically to hide them in the tank below or at the back of rocks, plants or driftwood", the other option is "to move to another tank/location which is somehow connected to the main tank. These equipments basically are:

- Temp meter (relatively easy physically due to small size)
- CO2 diffuzer and its piping inside the water (using reactor)
- Airstones and their piping inside the water (using reactor??)
- Heaters (using the filters with heaters)
- Surface skimmers (overflow by combs to sump??)
- Outlet and inlet filter pipes (using glass ones to minimize display)
- Monitoring device probes

In your opinion, can you please recommend the best/most effective way to do this for each, if not one complete system for all?
 

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In my set-up I use in-line Hydor heaters (I really like these) I would go Hydor + filter rather than heater built into the filter. CO2 reactor and in-line pH probe and temp probe. I haven't gone the glass filter pipe route yet. It is all very doable. All depends on space available and budget.

If you are really concerned about the look of the filter pipes, you could consider drilling the tank, there are pro's and con's to that, but it definitely is a clean look.

What size tank are you looking at?
 

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Hi,
Im in the process of trying to do the same thing.

I think most things can be hidden by usng inline gear...inline reactor fixes o2 and co2 issues, hydro heater, cansiter etc

The only problem is filter inlet and outlet pipes. Inlet can be fixed I guess by drilling a hole in the base and easily covered by plants. Havent figured out what to do with the outlet side of the cansiter though. Could drill another hole in the tank for it but then how would you get the water to flow through the whole tank like you get when you use a spray bar?

The use of a sump will also give you more options for things like temp and probes etc. but I dont have room for a sump on my 2ft
 

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You have a problem though. You have an equipment fetish. Most of the list you show is completely unneeded. What you NEED (and can cheaply do) to have for a high tech tank....ASSUMING your already on a high tech system (have your pressurized co2, lighting, ferts)


Hydor inline Heater - ~$50
Rex Reactor - ~$30
Inlet and Outlet - Drilled rimless tank $80-$1000 (lily pipes being the next best for a clean look)
Depending on how you set your outlet, you eliminate the need for a skimmer, and an airstone.


As to the rest of the pile? Go sell it on craigslist ;) Stick a thermometer in the water every once and a while, and toss in a drop checker every once and a while. As long as most tasks are automated/stable, you dont need to monitor 24/7. Especially as your talking about a sump, so its a larger tank.

I personally dose with a DIY reefdoser (they cost hundreds) inline. Certainly isnt needed though. I just wanted to be able to go on vacation and have the tank do its thing. I'm also planning on installing an auto water change system. But seeing as a python does just fine too, It is just another item that doesn't belong on the list.
 

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+1 for drilling the tank...

other than that...buy every inline gadget they make..and finally use lily pipes in the corners with a nice tall bushy plant (like cambomba) to hide them...

total cost:

$1.23 billion USD
Is that before or after the 1.7 jobs created to do the drilling? ;)
 

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I drilled my latest tank through the bottom (wasn't THAT expensive!:biggrin:) and the only equipment visible in the tank is the overflow, which I covered up with Fissidens.

There is also a thermometer and a drop checker... but they are just temporary until the tank is "dialed in".
 

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I'm in the process of doing this right now on my 120. When it's all said and done, the only things in the tank visible will be a return line coming over the edge of one corner and a mini float switch in the other corner.

The mini float switch is for my auto top-off/water change system. If I didn't have that, only the return line would be visible.

You can see the plumbing drawing in my 120g journal in my sig, but the bottom of my tank is drilled and feeds a closed loop filtration system. There is/will be a substrate level spray bar pointing straight up the back wall and that will eventually be completely hidden by plants. The intake is also through the bottom and too will eventually be completely covered in plants.

I could have even done away with the one return line coming over the back of the tank, but I really wanted a lot of turnover in the tank. It's a black loc-line against a black background, so will blend quite nicely.

Other great threads include:

http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/tank-journals-photo-album/47667-son-kahuna-56k.html

http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/t...um/40605-journal-mad-scientist-ada-120-p.html

http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/t...91292-wps-250-gal-plywood-starphire-tank.html
 

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You have two choices, you can put everything inline in your canister. You will still have your inlet and outlet (lily pipes can atleast make these look pleasing). Or you can go with a sump. A sump is overkill for just looks IMO, but if you are already considering it, then it would be even more reason to do so.

My personal preference is only keep ugly things out of the tank. I still have a heater in my tank because it has just been something on the back burner. I plan to get lily pipes, keep my glass diffusor, buy a bubble counter to replace my DIY. I think equipment can actually look pleasing when hand made. I am also the person who hates engine covers on new cars because I think an engine actually looks good and should be visable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
First of all, I'd like to thank all of you for your quick replies. I think many people have been concerned with the pollution caused by the displays of their tanks.

In my set-up I use in-line Hydor heaters (I really like these) I would go Hydor + filter rather than heater built into the filter. CO2 reactor and in-line pH probe and temp probe........If you are really concerned about the look of the filter pipes, you could consider drilling the tank, there are pro's and con's to that, but it definitely is a clean look.

What size tank are you looking at?
For the moment, I have a cabinet on which a tank with bottom dimensions of 90 by 45 cm can fit. So I can make the necessary modifications to the tank but I am planning to go with the same size (182 lt = 48 gallon).

You have a problem though. You have an equipment fetish. Most of the list you show is completely unneeded. What you NEED (and can cheaply do) to have for a high tech tank....ASSUMING your already on a high tech system (have your pressurized co2, lighting, ferts)


Hydor inline Heater - ~$50
Rex Reactor - ~$30
Inlet and Outlet - Drilled rimless tank $80-$1000 (lily pipes being the next best for a clean look)
Depending on how you set your outlet, you eliminate the need for a skimmer, and an airstone.
Yes I have a SO-CALLED high tech system. I'll check your recommendations.

As to the rest of the pile? Go sell it on craigslist ;) Stick a thermometer in the water every once and a while, and toss in a drop checker every once and a while. As long as most tasks are automated/stable, you dont need to monitor 24/7. Especially as your talking about a sump, so its a larger tank.
I don't monitor each and every value for 24/7, but the main purpose of using a permanent monitoring or metering tool is to take the measurement for the current situation whenever you want and as readily available, not as a 24/7 monitoring tool. I don't use a drop checker and a surface skimmer at the moment but I have got them. I have just included them into my original post because I wanted to know what the other options can be for those as well. This has made my original post more generic actually.

I'm in the process of doing this right now on my 120. When it's all said and done, the only things in the tank visible will be a return line coming over the edge of one corner and a mini float switch in the other corner.
That sounds inspiring.

You can see the plumbing drawing in my 120g journal in my sig, but the bottom of my tank is drilled and feeds a closed loop filtration system. There is/will be a substrate level spray bar pointing straight up the back wall and that will eventually be completely hidden by plants. The intake is also through the bottom and too will eventually be completely covered in plants.

I could have even done away with the one return line coming over the back of the tank, but I really wanted a lot of turnover in the tank. It's a black loc-line against a black background, so will blend quite nicely.

Other great threads include:

http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/tank-journals-photo-album/47667-son-kahuna-56k.html

http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/t...um/40605-journal-mad-scientist-ada-120-p.html

http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/t...91292-wps-250-gal-plywood-starphire-tank.html
I'll go through the info in all these.

You have two choices, you can put everything inline in your canister. You will still have your inlet and outlet (lily pipes can atleast make these look pleasing). Or you can go with a sump. A sump is overkill for just looks IMO, but if you are already considering it, then it would be even more reason to do so.

My personal preference is only keep ugly things out of the tank. I still have a heater in my tank because it has just been something on the back burner. I plan to get lily pipes, keep my glass diffusor, buy a bubble counter to replace my DIY. I think equipment can actually look pleasing when hand made. I am also the person who hates engine covers on new cars because I think an engine actually looks good and should be visable.
I agree with you and I will make this decision soon. Canister filter media cleaning really bothers me. Sump/trickle filter must be much easier on this, doesn't it? Another point is that a clean open engine is OK on a new car. It is also OK when everything put into the tank is new. But seeing always algae on a diffuser, difficult cleaning of aquarium glasses due to so many suction cups in and out of the tank glass do not look so pleasing.

To All:
Before asking some further questions, let me digest your recommendations written above. Using a sump seems quite reasonable but not drilling the tank. First I will check if I can have a sump without drilling the tank and how. I don't care CO2 loss as long as I can keep the target amount stable.

Can you please tell me the minimum sump volume which is recommended to work effectively with a 50 gallon tank?

My research will continue and I will inform you back.
 

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If you don't want to drill your tank, you can make a heater/co2 reactor and run that after a canister. Then you only have to deal with your pipes. I don't see the need to run an airstone but that could be added. My reason for a sump is that it is easy to hide everything but if you don't want to drill your tank, you really can do all this pretty easily with a canister filter and everything inline.
 

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Well, one of the largest benefits of using a sump is increased water volume, minimizing the effects of temperature and changes to water chemistry. In this respect, the best sump volume is the biggest you can fit under your tank.


However, I've seen people with 55g tanks use a 5.5g sump when all they wanted to do was hide equipment.
 
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