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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

I am quite disappointed in my recent fish purchase. Yesterday 1/9 i bought 2 german rams from a very reputable fish store. I took them home after an hour car ride and acclimated them to my tank. I only took twenty mins to acclimate both (probably should have waited longer). I noticed that they were a little shy and hiding and didnt seem to eat any of the various foods that i fed my tank last night. When i woke up this morning one was dead, and the other is on its way. My water parameters are:
Nitrate: 5 Mg/l
pH: 7.0
Ammonia: .25 mg/l
Nitrite: 0 mg/l

I have a picture of the fish but i am not sure how to insert it as a thumbnail

Damian
 

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With detectable ammonia, it is the reason why your rams died.:( Even a small trace of ammonia can kill.
IMO, fish will settle completely after more than 24 hours but it can vary. Do not expect new fish to immediately eat the foods you give them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Is a water change the best way to get rid of it? Would it be a better idea to use the white carbon crystals in my filter media cartridge to help eliminate the ammonia? What would cause one of the rams to stay at the top of the water with its mouth to the surface trying to get air? I have plently of circulation in the water
 

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Is a water change the best way to get rid of it? Would it be a better idea to use the white carbon crystals in my filter media cartridge to help eliminate the ammonia? What would cause one of the rams to stay at the top of the water with its mouth to the surface trying to get air? I have plently of circulation in the water
Ammonia can cause gill burns so this could be the reason why it was staying on the surface. I'm not sure what those white carbon crystals are so I won't comment on the use of it. I'd go with water changes.:)
 

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I think you should have acclimated the fish a little longer. Being an hour away, I would assume the LFS has different water parameters than yours, especially if there was a big pH difference. If I remember correctly, ammonia poisoning will take longer to kill most fish, compared to pH shock.

How did you acclimate the fish?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thats a good point about the water being different. I was thinking it might be a ph shock as well, but everywhere i read it said the rams could survive in water with ph of 7. I acclimated the guys by letting the bag sit in the water for about 15 mins to acclimate temp, and then let some water in the bag from the tank for about 2 mins... probably should have done that longer but i have not had any problems with any of my rainbows.
 

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I wouldn't introduce any new livestock to a tank with any detectable ammonia. For what ever reason, the tank is not completely cycled or you have a buildup of deacying matter, and the added bio load will just compound the ammonia issue. An hour ride *may* cause some initial ammonia poisoning too, but from the looks of the picture it's hard to say. I had some fish in a bag a little too long once, and you could literally see the slimecoat damage. They bounced back quickly with some Melafix. Definitely get your H2O parameters normalized before you're tempted to add more livestock.

Tommy
 
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