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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone here know why neos who interbreed between color varieties produce offspring that have wild coloration rather than taking on one or both of the parents' colors? Seems odd to me...

Thanks,
Matt M.
 

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probably because that color trait is more dominant. Neos were selectively bred to show more color so we can assume that the expression of these colors were recessive and or mutations. Therefore when you breed two neos of different color they both carry the dominant gene for the wild coloration and since its dominant it has more probability of being expressed
 

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Does anyone here know why neos who interbreed between color varieties produce offspring that have wild coloration rather than taking on one or both of the parents' colors? Seems odd to me...

Thanks,
Matt M.
They dont. depending on what colors you pick, you usually get rilli's from interbreeding

probably because that color trait is more dominant. Neos were selectively bred to show more color so we can assume that the expression of these colors were recessive and or mutations. Therefore when you breed two neos of different color they both carry the dominant gene for the wild coloration and since its dominant it has more probability of being expressed
Seems logical except that the brown color isn't dominant, if it was dominant, it would show up on every shrimp, but i think its a bit more complex. If you stop culling a neo culture, no matter what color you got, eventually they will turn back wild color(after X amount of generations). If it was only gene dominance, it would happen a lot faster, wouldn't it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
They dont. depending on what colors you pick, you usually get rilli's from interbreeding



Seems logical except that the brown color isn't dominant, if it was dominant, it would show up on every shrimp, but i think its a bit more complex. If you stop culling a neo culture, no matter what color you got, eventually they will turn back wild color(after X amount of generations). If it was only gene dominance, it would happen a lot faster, wouldn't it?
So I was told that by having my pumpkin (orange) shrimp in the same tank as my fire red cherry shrimp I was at risk of having offspring that look like wild neos... Have you had other experiences? I have no real experience with shrimp do anything I know is from research and this forum. I would love to hear your experiences.

- Matt M.

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probably because that color trait is more dominant. Neos were selectively bred to show more color so we can assume that the expression of these colors were recessive and or mutations. Therefore when you breed two neos of different color they both carry the dominant gene for the wild coloration and since its dominant it has more probability of being expressed
This makes some sense to me, but then again, thinking of other animals I'm more familiar with... Under that logic wouldn't that mean that overtime if we let all purebred dogs bread with each other they would all just eventually become wolves or a wolf like canine after x generations? Thanks for the feedback.

- Matt M.
 

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So I was told that by having my pumpkin (orange) shrimp in the same tank as my fire red cherry shrimp I was at risk of having offspring that look like wild neos... Have you had other experiences? I have no real experience with shrimp do anything I know is from research and this forum. I would love to hear your experiences.

- Matt M.
It could be that the orange is just a variation of the red, rather than an independent mutation on its own. I know there's quite a range of reds- lighter, darker, more maroon, and so on. Seems simple enough that some might be more orange than others.

As far as I'm aware, color is carried in either the shell or the tissue of the shrimp- reds appear to mostly be in the shell of the shrimp, while I've noticed that blue coloration is in the tissue. I'm trying for some blue-bodied Red Rilis, and have a few that happen to have both the blue tissue and the red shells. Unfortunately my camera and lighting situation is not adequate to show this...
 

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This makes some sense to me, but then again, thinking of other animals I'm more familiar with... Under that logic wouldn't that mean that overtime if we let all purebred dogs bread with each other they would all just eventually become wolves or a wolf like canine after x generations? Thanks for the feedback.

- Matt M.
As far as dogs go, yes and no. If allowed to run wild with no human influence, yes. But dogs differ from shrimp- their domesticity itself actually influences physical traits even without selective breeding for colour, type, etc.: http://blogs.scientificamerican.com...tten-russian-experiment-in-fox-domestication/
 
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