The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone had any experience with an inline CO2 atomizer and an inline pump from a canister? I was wondering if it would chop up the CO2 bubbles better to help with the fizzy look. I'm running a Eheim 2217 to a CO2Art atomizer to a Hydor inline heater.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
734 Posts
Has anyone had any experience with an inline CO2 atomizer and an inline pump from a canister? I was wondering if it would chop up the CO2 bubbles better to help with the fizzy look. I'm running a Eheim 2217 to a CO2Art atomizer to a Hydor inline heater.
Are you suggesting adding in inline pump to your tank return(canister output) tubing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
I tried the same atomizer from CO2 Art and didnt like the fog of bubbles in my tank. It sounds like your asking if adding an In-line pump would eliminate some of bubbles somehow? I highly doubt it; a reactor is the way to go.

Sent from my SM-A205U using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes I was considering an inline pump on my canister tubing. Any suggestions on a reactor? I was looking at the Aqua medic reactor 1000 but its not available. What do you use?

Are you suggesting adding in inline pump to your tank return(canister output) tubing?
Yes after the atomizer to help chop up the CO2 bubbles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Hello. I have not used CO2 reactors or diffusers for many years. At the outlet of the filter (my favorite is the 2217 from Eheim) I place a small glass of water filtration for consumption (the last one for € 14 in stores), as attached. If he does not have it, you place a pvc tube from his head to the bottom, to force the water to travel. Before him you inject the CO2. And resolved. CO2 will not escape from its top and dissolves quickly and without visible bubbles. Simple and very effective.
1030036
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hello. I have not used CO2 reactors or diffusers for many years. At the outlet of the filter (my favorite is the 2217 from Eheim) I place a small glass of water filtration for consumption (the last one for € 14 in stores), as attached. If he does not have it, you place a pvc tube from his head to the bottom, to force the water to travel. Before him you inject the CO2. And resolved. CO2 will not escape from its top and dissolves quickly and without visible bubbles. Simple and very effective. View attachment 1030036
I like that idea. Simple and inexpensive. Plus those types of water filters rarely leak because they are built to withstand household pressure.

What size is the one that you use?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,245 Posts
I like that idea. Simple and inexpensive. Plus those types of water filters rarely leak because they are built to withstand household pressure.
Yes, this is great. Just to be clear though, this is a Cerges-style reactor. It's the general reactor design used by many around here, myself included.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
734 Posts
Yes, this is great. Just to be clear though, this is a Cerges-style reactor. It's the general reactor design used by many around here, myself included.
I tried a Griggs but went back to an inline reactor. The Griggs gurgled a lot, especially after I would service my filter. It also made priming my pump tough.

Does the Cerges gurgle?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,245 Posts
I tried a Griggs but went back to an inline reactor. The Griggs gurgled a lot, especially after I would service my filter. It also made priming my pump tough.

Does the Cerges gurgle?
They can if not configured well. I can't hear mine unless I have my head in the cabinet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,245 Posts
How about using an inline diffusor ahead of the Cerges rather than injecting the CO2 directly into it?

It seems like the best of all worlds. Very small bubbles going into the chamber to be absorbed more completely. I imagine that someone has already tried this?
Yeah, I have tried this... It can be better (quieter) than some injection methods, but then you have the ceramic disc to service which seemed to detract from the maintenance-free ethos of the reactor. The loudest injection method with a cerges in my experience is a barb on a t-fitting because it allows gas to build up in the fitting before being swept into the water, making a 'glug glug' sound. I now use the barbs but with a length of tubing on the inside that prevents those bubbles from forming inside the fitting. I'm also experimenting with placing a 1/4" tubing bulkhead in the lid of the housing, but I haven't tested that yet.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top