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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Melanoides tuberculata


Original Image: http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2140/2126617775_682b8d6034.jpg

Common Names

- Malaysian Trumpet Snail
- Trumpet Snail
- Live Bearing Snail

Acronyms

- MTS

Water Parameters

Temperature: 76-82 F
Ph: 6.5-8.0

Diet

Omnivorous

Eats: algae, fish food, invertebrate food, algae wafers, etc.

Breeding Behavior

Rate: Very Fast
Reproducing Type: Asexual
Live Bearers

This snail is one of the most versatile and beneficial snails within the hobby. Some hobbyist consider this snail a pest due to its prolific breeding, and try to annihilate the population. However, I want to show the good side of this wonderful invertebrate.

First of all, these snails eat minimal live plant matter. Some accounts of these snails eating their live plants is that the snails could be hungry. Supplement feeding of algae wafers prevent this from happening. These snails will happily eat algae and any leftover food for shrimp or fish. Another benefit of these snails is that they are not large enough to push shrimp away for food. Thus, shrimp and fish always get priority for food.

Secondly, these snails aerate the substrate. This prevents harmful pockets of uneaten food from building up, and in a cleaning, burst in a flurry of ammonia into the water column. The snails will bury themselves within the substrate and eat the food. Some hobbyist say that the snails destroy carpeting plants such as Hemianthus callitrichoides by uprooting them. I cannot say this is true or not, for I have never had this problem.

Thirdly, these snails reproduce quickly without eggs and with a single snail. Some hobbyist see the prolific reproduction as a benefit, however, many hobbyist see this as invasive. I personally, enjoy seeing baby trumpets eating algae and biofilm off my glass. Honestly, I see no harm in this snail being able to reproduce quickly, as you can give or sell the adults as the fry need no special attention. However, a rapid reproduction rate is a sign of overfeeding.

Finally, this is the only snail able to survive in the hard waters of African Cichlids!

Overall, these are great snails for any tank, hardy, undemanding sums them up.

 

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Opae Ula Crazed.
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A local fish shop has a number of snails which look like these. When I asked if they sell them I was told "no, we're trying to kill them".

Are there other snails that look similar to these? I mean, how would I recognize a MTS vs another species?

Thanks!
 

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A local fish shop has a number of snails which look like these. When I asked if they sell them I was told "no, we're trying to kill them".

Are there other snails that look similar to these? I mean, how would I recognize a MTS vs another species?

Thanks!
Look for them in the substrate. They really dig down in. If you see this behaviour it's most likely them. My tank is loaded with these guys and I'm a fan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
A local fish shop has a number of snails which look like these. When I asked if they sell them I was told "no, we're trying to kill them".

Are there other snails that look similar to these? I mean, how would I recognize a MTS vs another species?

Thanks!
The only other snail that looks similar to MTS are Sulawesi snails and I doubt your LFS is trying to kill them.

I would get three to start as they reproduce fast.

Cheers,
Justin
 

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I bought 25 MTS off eBay for £8 ($15) now 4 months on they have multiplied beyond all expectations, whilst they are fun to watch and they only really come out about 20mins after lights off they do a good job of moving the substrate around for plants roots etc.

But now there a pain in the ass, i cleaned my filter out the other day and there where literally hundreds in there im seriously thinking about getting a clown loach or something similar to keep them in check.

Whilst fun for a while be warned these can be a major headache 4months down the line.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have these in a shrimp tank and to prevent the young ones from dying in your filter, I recommend you adding a sponge pre-filter to your tank's intake.

Cheers,
Justin
 

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Trumpet Snail

species are more than what you expect. most common types appear in your tank are the south american trumpet snails, MTS, and MTS(false? that is what I call it, look similar, but different species)

look closer if you have a tank with large population of Trumpet snails from different sources, you may be surprised.
 
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