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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm setting up a 55 gallon goldfish tank in the livingroom, and planning on a 120+ also. Water changes on the smaller tanks we have (biggest currently is a 33 cube) isn't too bad with pitchers and buckets, but not looking forward to it on the bigger ones. I'm thinking of plumbing in a drain in the stand with a 1/10 hp pump inline for water changes and substrate cleaning. And a hose bib with hot and cold valves for filling, probably add a temp gauge inline to match water temp while I'm at it. Has anyone done this?
 

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I am plumbing my 180g planted tank with hot/cold and sewer lines. I am using a temperature compensating valve to mix the hot and cold lines to the tank water temperature. I am using a 55g sump on my 180g tank. The mixed tank temperature fresh water will enter the sump via a float valve. When I pump dirty tank water out of the first compartment in the sump the sump water level will lower opeining the float valve in the second compartment replenishing the sump with fresh water of the proper temperature. Putting the dirty water exhaust pump on a timer to run 5 minutes every day will result in daily automatic water changes.

https://www.monsterfishkeepers.com/forums/threads/180g-attempted-low-easy-maintenance-peninsula-dirt-bottom-planted-tank-build.714316/page-7#post-8268192

I am on well water so we have never pre-treated tap water, it has always gone straight into the tank from the tap.

For my daughters 55g Axolotl tank in her bedroom we use a 20 foot hose connected to a venturi in the laundry room sink to drain the tank then remove the venturi and fill the tank back up with water using the same 20 foot hose. My daughter has never experienced the joy of drinking tank water to start a siphon and lugging around 5g buckets.
 

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I like the idea of using a temp comp valve, I could easily source one from work and may do so when I do the big tank (got a line on a 150 for a good price). Plumbing into the sump is a great idea for near zero input maintenance.

For my upstairs tanks where I have both tropical and coldwater I'm thinking of a hose bib fed by both hot and cold valves with a thermometer installed in the outlet to match tank temp. Along with a pump to start the suction for water changes, what is the venturi that you used to siphon? That may be easier and cheaper than an electric pump.

Gonna end up with two 55s, a 33 cube, 2 20 longs and a few 10s upstairs so I want an easy maintenance setup.

I will say your daughter should at least once enjoy the old way of doing water changes, it's a blast 🤣 that was the main reason I got rid of my 220 years ago.
 

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You can also cut PVC tubing into a U shape and make the length of the part in your tank match the amount of water you want to take out. Doing so will allow you to start the siphon and walk away, knowing that you won't drain too much water. I don't have water plumbed to my tank, but I have a mixing station in the basement with a strong enough pump to pump water up to my first floor where the tanks are. The only inconvenience is that I have to roll the hose out and put it away with every water change, but it only takes a minute or two. I drain the water using the same hose, flip some valves, then pump the water back into the tank. Something to consider depending on how much work it will take you to plumb lines that close to your tank.
 

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I like the idea of using a temp comp valve, I could easily source one from work and may do so when I do the big tank (got a line on a 150 for a good price). Plumbing into the sump is a great idea for near zero input maintenance.

For my upstairs tanks where I have both tropical and coldwater I'm thinking of a hose bib fed by both hot and cold valves with a thermometer installed in the outlet to match tank temp. Along with a pump to start the suction for water changes, what is the venturi that you used to siphon? That may be easier and cheaper than an electric pump.

Gonna end up with two 55s, a 33 cube, 2 20 longs and a few 10s upstairs so I want an easy maintenance setup.

I will say your daughter should at least once enjoy the old way of doing water changes, it's a blast 🤣 that was the main reason I got rid of my 220 years ago.

https://www.amazon.com/Waterbed-Fill-Drain-Venturi-Pump/dp/B010N4V5LA/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=venturi+water+bed&qid=1599582690&sr=8-4

The venturi attaches to a garden hose connection. The kit comes with a cheap plastic adapter to connect it to a bathroom sink. You will most likely find that you will want to replace the cheap plastic adapter with a brass one. The venturi isn't fancy but it does the job and is easy to use. If you have the enough elevation drop the venturi is much easier for us than messing with an electric pump.

I keep telling my daughter "In the good old days...." and for some reason she just seems to tune me out. LOL!


I replaced the faucet in our laundry room with this one because it has a garden hose thread for connecting up a hose. It might be easier for you than a garden hose bib and two separate valves.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B011BIOVQS/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1


If you go with a temperature controlled valve (I am very pleased with the one I bought) make sure you get the correct threaded fittings for the valve.

P.S. I made a "garden hose" out of 1/2" black corrugated pond tubing for aquarium maintenance. It is kink free and much lighter than a garden hose which makes it much easier to use:
Wood Electrical wiring Cable Electrical supply Wire
 
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