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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm beginning to learn that understanding this topic is at the heart of understanding the planting and growing of aquarium plants. I have read everything I could and I've worked the search function to death but what I would like is any and all links on articles that help explain the difference in how a plant responds to each.

You want to grow a plant it's best to understand that plant. And contrary to what many think, I can tell from a lot of questions and advice being bandied about that many members do NOT understand the intricacies of this subject.

Thank you
MeCasa
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I appreciate your wisdom, but besides correcting what you feel is an error in my post, do you have anything to add on the actual subject of the post :)

Share that knowledge

PS: I just murdered some expensive stems due to lack of knowledge of the immersion and emmersion.

http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/showthread.php?p=5976193#post5976193

I don't want this to happen again. A poster asked me why I did what I did and the truth was that despite multiple questions on the subject straight answers were hard to come by.

So I'm asking again
 

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I found this quote years ago, had to Google it to find the exact wording.

Try using the terms Submersed and Emersed instead of Immersed/Emersed it might make more sense. Submersed is generally completely under water, Emersed is where the plant can grow out of the water.
What exactly do you want to know? You want to know how a plant responds to being submerged or emersed? It depends on the plant. Some react quickly to being grown out of water (more broad leaf plants) and others transform to something different (a handful of stem plants.) To have an article that denotes all of this for all species is impossible. Your best bet of finding this information, is to list the species you're most interested about and ask for those directly. Meanwhile, if you wish to verify facts, there is always research via Google.
 

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I did both of your suggestions and still murdered a plant.

I simply asked for any good articles on the subject that anybody would be willing to share.

Here's an example of an excellent article penned by Seattle

http://seattleaquarist.blogspot.com/

I simply asked for more excellent articles, just on the possibility that my searches missed something

Tried to explain to OP in his thread started on 5/9/14.
A link would have been easier but I'll look it up

PS: I'm new to forums and I don't know an easy way to find your post, will you post a link
 

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Can you fill me in on what you did to cause you to think you "murdered a plant"?

My experience with emersed setups are for grow out purposes. That said, I have about 2" of water in a bare bottom setup with potted plants in MGOPS or other substrates. The water never goes over the plants, but barely over the lip of any of the terracotta pots I have the plants in. If I'm using a strong lighting setup that kicks out significant heat in the setup (fluorescent, incandescent, HQI, halide, CFL) then I use a ultrasonic fogger to keep up humidity to not dry out the plant. Some people go through with regular mistings through out a day, but if I'm away I can't do that. Aside from the nutrients in the soil, I go through with regular supplements throughout the week. There are other things I'm working with, but to reduce confusion I won't get into that.
 

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It looks like you didn't keep the humidity up and that the plants were too tall. To start emersed growth, you need to start with shorter cuttings. Stems that tall are more brittle since the stems get thinner while submersed, emersed growth stems tend to be a little thicker. Emersed growing involves a wet substrate and a humid airzone. If you don't keep up with the humidity and make sure the temperature doesn't get too hot from lighting, there isn't an issue.
 

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First thing is to get the term correct as has been said.
Just take the Amazon Sword for an example. In a natural setting it is sometimes fully submersed. During the dry season however it may just be in a mud puddle.
If you want to really learn about plants and growing requirements look for articles on their natural habitats. Then, as best you can duplicate them. My Amazons do very well when I keep them in a lowered water state for a couple of months then flood them for the rest of the time.
I've got some bacopa that does well either way.
In addition to research look at how the plants are where you're keeping them. They will tell you what they need if you're observant enough.
Another thing might be to just try a bit of each plant in both conditions and see which does better. PS I have very little trouble with my dirt tanks.
 

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If you want to really learn about plants and growing requirements look for articles on their natural habitats.
That kinda seems to be what the OP is trying to do with this thread...

MeCasa, I don't know any good articles, but I would definitely recommend Diana Walstad's book Ecology of the Planted Aquarium if you haven't read it.
 

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Who grows stem plants emersed? They are so easy to grow and cull. The only plant I would ever consider growing emersed would be a tiny plant that won't anchor like dwarf baby tears , glosso, dhg etc. I would think growing tall stem plants would result in just growing the stem lol since most of the leaves would most likely melt after the flood it's only common sense :icon_roll
 

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Pixel Prestidigitator
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That kinda seems to be what the OP is trying to do with this thread...

MeCasa, I don't know any good articles, but I would definitely recommend Diana Walstad's book Ecology of the Planted Aquarium if you haven't read it.
As evidenced by the answers here however the answers aren't forthcoming. Aside from that I was referring to their natural habitat. As an example when I was researching the Amazon Swords. I didn't learn here about life in their natural habitat only their life in aquariums. Same thing as many of the other plants I keep. Some plants took a lot of research.

Don't get me wrong about TPT though. I think the people here are some of the most knowledgeable around and it's one of many reasons I spend way too much time here and gladly support this site. But in some things you need to look in other areas and not a forum.
 
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