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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently I've been trying to do right by my fish in terms of food. I made them gel food and today I gave them a blanched, peeled circle of zucchini. In this tank, I have three angels, three cories, a banjo cat, and two raphael cats (as well as a hidden colony of fire red and Sakura shrimp).

pH is between 6.8 and 7.2. Ammonia and nitrites are 0, nitrates are between 20 and 40, I keep the temperature at 75°.

A few hours after lights out, I turned my room light on to remove the uneaten portion of zucchini, and there are white spots ALL OVER my tank walls. Three patches of 20 or so on the front, smaller patches on the sides and back, even a small patch on the heater. They look hollow, broken.

I pulled a pond snail out the other day but having raised many, many generations in a separate tank a while back, I know these aren't pond snail eggs. So what do I have all over my tank?
 

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Those are cory eggs :)
But they are busted open... :(

Congrats on making your fish happy though!
There will be plenty more to come. Keep an eye out for spawning activity (males will chase around females, T-post and then the female will release a clutch of eggs into her pelvic fins and place them somewhere). Collect the eggs and separate if you want the babies to survive. It's pretty easy to breed corys and raise the fry, so it's very do-able.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well! That certainly explains why one of the angelfish was looking particularly bloated, he stuffed himself full of protein.

Only took two years, but I'm glad my cories are happy enough to spawn. Thank you for identifying them as that, now I'll know to expect more catfish once my angels have their own tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If the size difference is anything, I have two females. Possible both spawned?

If I got my 10 gallon cleaned up, set up, and cycled, would it be fair to the cories to keep a school in it? Is 10 gallons enough for 6 cories?
 

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it is not ideal, unless you just want to keep them in there until they spawn and move them again.
20 gal is often suggested for corys. I have my 6 in a 2' 60L tank with about 50L of water.
 

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:p
not at all trying to brag or anything, but all of my corys (have had over 14 different corydoras species spawn) lay tonsssss of eggs. From the pics, each female lays that many every 1 to 1 1/2 clutches (per T-post spawn), and they go at it for many hours on end. Daily!..... So hundreds per female, daily. I'm only a hobbyist and not breeding to try and make any money so I got tired loooonnnng ago, collecting eggs. So I just leave them be (all the eggs get eaten in the community tanks, so no babies).
A minimum of 60 eggs per female per day is the norm in my experience (that's minimum, usually mine lay hundreds daily per female).

Per clutch (after every T-post), there is anywhere from as little as 3 eggs, to as much as maybe 15 or so (usually 6-10). Just depends how many the females shoots out. Depends on the cory species as well. Some species have smaller eggs, but more amount. Some have less, but larger eggs.

Not exaggerating, not making it up. My corys would spawn for multiple hours every single day for over 2 weeks. I probably can have them spawn even longer than that, but I intentionally would fast (not feed) all the for a couple days or so (just what I normally do to give digestive systems a break. I even fast myself and my dogs).
Believe it or not, I don't even try to trigger them to spawn (no cold water changes, conditioning with high protein diets, etc. either). Mine apparently have just been really happy (this all takes place in heavily overstocked tanks as well). I could probably get mine to pretty much breed regularly throughout a whole year.
My local friends that know, have always wanted me to breed, or share my "secrets" (I really don't do anything to trigger spawning), but I'm only in this hobby for fun/to enjoy, not work (maintenance is enough for me).

But hey, any spawning, even if just one T-post per day is something :) They are happy enough to at least go at it a little bit (not saying if they are not spawning, they are not happy)
Just giving my personal experience and how many eggs you could potentially expect.


There are some Corydoras breeders that breed small groups in 10 gallon tanks. For the average fish keeper, getting Corys to breed in a 10 gallon would be a fairly challenging (most probably wouldn't breed). They just aren't really happy to breed readily without spawning triggers. It's doable, but a bit harder. I personally wouldn't keep Corydoras aeneus or any similar sized corys in a 10 gallon, just not big enough for them to live out their lives.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Okay. I'll leave the 10 as a quarantine/hospital and invest in a larger tank if I feel like seeing tiny cories grow. I feel immense satisfaction watching baby fish mature, so when I have an income and space perhaps I'll set up a 20-40B.

Thanks again for the information!
 

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You can grow out the little babies in a 10 gallon though!
Being without the adults and other fish, means the young Corys are sure to get adequate nutrition to grow to their full potential.
A larger tank would be better, but a 10 is fine for young Corys.

My pygmy Corys literally reach adult size in just a couple months.

Use the spare tank to separate the eggs from the rest of the fish (even Corys will eat the eggs), and just let them grow.
Provide decent water circulation and surface agitation, especially on the eggs, otherwise the eggs will fungus over (eggs/wigglers often won't survive unless you use a med to kill/prevent the fungus).
Supposedly some snails and shrimp can clean the fertilized eggs, keeping them free of fungus and won't harm the eggs/fry.
They take about 3 days to emerge from their eggs (temperature dependent). Takes 2 days for them to absorb their yolk sac, so no need to feed those first couple days.
 
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