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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a little behind doing my water changes, but before that he already had something on his mouth like a white dot or something. I ignored it because I always thought it was the other male platy that bitten him on his mouth that it got that. He's the only one that has that on his mouth. The other fish that seems sick is the electric blue ram that might have internal parasite, but he seems fine. I ordered a few days ago online hikari prazipro. It should be delivered tomorrow, but that's for parasites.

Of all my fish in my 40g breeder tank, only the two males mickey blue platies are constantly chasing each other trying to show who is dominant. The one with the infected mouth WAS the dominant platy. A few weeks ago I see that he has that thing on his mouth and suddenly he's trying to get away from the "weaker" male platy. That's why I didn't think too much about the mouth injury thinking that it was just an injury and that it'll go away. But now I'm not so sure if it's an infection like fungus or what.

here's a picture:
 

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Could it just be an injury? Hopefully someone more experienced will chime in. If an injury he might improve if you start doing frequent water changes. I would do daily 25-50% if you decide to got his route. I would do this anyway as it can dilute any fungus/bacteria in the tank. Probably this is what I would start with-also separating this fish to a 5-10 gallon hospital tank if possible (keep water quality excellent). See if you see any change.

As far as medications I'm not sure with your loach. I have never had great success medicating any fish as they were either too far gone or I diagnosed wrong, or the medication seemed to be so hard on them it killed the fish. Mouth fungus could be columnaris. I had rainbowfish that are prone to injuring their mouth-I treated them with Seachem Paraguard-it's sort of broad spectrum if you aren't sure exactly what you are treating. That worked but they may have healed as well on their own. I would use a hospital tank if just that fish is affected so far. Paraguard can stain silicone. If it's an injury it can still get a secondary infection of fungus like saprolegnia. I have also used Triple Sulfa or similar for mild fungus on injured fish-some it seemed to help others not-but it was OK in my main tank.

You could try to do a bath/dip with methylene blue or, paraguad, or acrifalivene(spelling?) the latter can make a fish sterile though. Research this online if you never did a bath before.

If it was me-again-I'd separate the fish, do lots of water changes in both your tank and the hospital tank, then only treat fish with medication if I saw more symptoms/fish getting worse/not getting any better. Hope someone else comes along to give their input. Very pretty fish!
 

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Yeah, I couldn't keep fish without methylene blue. It is so cheap, yet so effective. It is my first line of defence.
I don't like putting it in my tanks though as it stains the silicone. Rather just use a glass coffee pot or jug or something.
premix a gallon bottle at double the dose on the bottle, pour in jug, float jug in tank till it heats up, insert fish for 30 minutes.
Repeat every morning and evening, it should stain or remove the fungus in one bath. It will however come back if you don't keep up the treatment for 2 or 3 days.

Pristine water quality will help your fish heal faster. Do a nice 30% water change. It might have been a small injury, but less than optimal water conditions are ideal breeding grounds for fungus and bacteria.
Make sure you have good water circulation in your tank. If you have a hospital tank, I'd keep it separate from the other fish till it is better, and then for another week or 2, just to make sure.

That is a very interesting colour combo, not what would traditionally be called a mickey mouse. Those little black dots in the tail is a swordtail gene. they are very pretty fish you have there.
Somewhere between a Malibu and a Rainbow.

I love how nature sometimes throws out freaks... I have 2 reddish rainbow fry from an established pair. They look just like their siblings, just a much more orangey copper tone and about twice as dark.
Sadly the tank they were in took very long to cycle, and they are quite stunted. so it will be a little wait still to breed with them. They are like 25% the size of another drop born 5 days before them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Dariofan: thank you for your help! I never heard of methylene before, but I already checked online how the bottle looks. I'll check tomorrow at the nearest LFS and see if I can find it. I haven't had luck finding paraguard.

Nordic: I can do that (the 30 minute treatment) but I can only do it after 5pm because of work = /.

I have a 10g tank that's empty. But how can I treat the sick fish correcty with a new setup tank? The water won't have beneficial bactetia.

Thank you! You're saying my platy mickey mouse is actually a sword platy? Will it have a sword tail overtime? When I bought the two of them, they were completely blue. After having them for a while they started to develop orange colors around their dorsal fins and tail.

The problem I have with them is that they constantly chase each other. But they never had tail ripped or any physical damage. It's the first time I see one of then actually showing signs of physical injury. Will getting 2 more platies help reduce their aggression?
 

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Mouth 'Fungus' is often a bacterial disease caused by Flavobacterium columnaris. Antibiotics that target Gram negative bacteria are effective.

In injury (bumping into something) may be followed by a true fungal infection.

To treat a single Platy in a 10 gallon tank:
Move the Platy into a blend of 50% new water and 50% water from the tank.
Move a small amount of the filter media from the established tank to the hospital tank. Note that the medicine may kill the microorganisms in this filter media, so it may help, it might not.
Add plant trimmings, extras, let them drift. This will give the Platy a place to hide, and the plants can help with the ammonia. They won't be happy with the salt, and some meds are pretty hard on plants, so this may or may not help with the ammonia, either. It will help with a hiding place, so if you do not have any trimmings, add something else that might offer a hiding place.
Add salt at the rate of 1 teaspoon per 5 gallons today, another 1 tsp/5 gal tomorrow, and another 1 tsp/5 gal the next day. Platies are just fine with salt, and sometimes salt can slow down some microorganisms. It will help with stress.

Monitor the ammonia, nitrite and nitrate.
Do enough water changes to keep the ammonia and nitrite undetectible, and the NO3 very low.
When you do a water change re-dose the salt according to the size of the water change (if you change 2.5 gallons of water, add .5 tsp salt). Re-dose whatever meds you are using, too.
 

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Salt from the kitchen has been fine, IME. Many people say the anti-caking ingredients are bad. Kosher or Pickling salt should be free of these. (grocery store, read the label). Water softener salt is also free of this. Make sure it is sodium chloride- there is another water softener salt based on potassium.
The 'Aquarium Salt' in the fish store is fine, too. Not the salt and mineral blend sold for making ocean water.
 

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All great info. given.

A physical injury/wound is possible. A open would and weakened fish is more vulnerable to infections though. Keep the water healthy and monitor the damaged sight.

The clean water alone, and with the fish's immune system, the damage may clear and heal on it's own. Just watch it, if it gets better then it should be fine, but if it grows/gets worse, then you should consider treating it.

Especially if you seen fuzzy cottony growth and/or the mouth area appears to be decaying, I would start treating. Columnaris is a gram negative aerobic bacterium and should be treated with the appropriate antibiotic. Kanamycin (Seachem Kanaplex), and Nitrofurazone (API Furan-2) have shown higher success rates in curing, especially when used together at the same time.

Methylene Blue dips can help, especially with mild symptoms/early outbreaks, so they are worth trying. Salt does have some potential benefit as well (depending on concentration and infection severity). Cooler water temps slows down Columnaris progression. For a minor infection, I would try these steps before going to an antibiotic (unless the disease was widespread and fish were dying rapidly).


In regards to what type of salt to use, I have come across this: Columnaris Disease in Fish, Bettas, etc., Correct Treatment
"The type of salt used should be non-iodized and contain no ‘free flow’ or other additives (e.g. no iodine or sodium ferrocyanide etc. I have used ‘Freshwater Aquarium Salt’, rock salt and sea salt. If purchasing non-aquarium salt please read the packaging carefully as current trends show an increase in the use of additives even in natural products such as rock salt (UK)."
 

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Haha, no, they won't grow swords, they were crossed with swords at some point in their ancestry.
You will probably notice that thy are longer thinner platties than more "pure" strains, they are pretty much all somewhat hybridised.

your LFS should carry aquarium salt. It is cheap, it is just plain NaCl.
 

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Thanks Diana for giving more details-I couldn't remember all of that from when I was dealing with my rainbows.

Manami-if you don't overfeed a lot in the hospital tank and with water changes you may not have a problem as far as ammonia, etc. If you can find it there are filter media that remove ammonia, nitrite & nitrates, one is called poly-filter but there are other brands by most major aquarium filter makers. However these work like active charcoal and also absorb medications from the water-so if you are treating the hospital tank you would have to remove them. As Diana mentioned I would add some filter media from an established filter to the tank.

How is your platy? Hope he's on the mend.

Forgot to mention:

Male platies can be mildly aggressive with one another. If you only have 2 and the chasing is stressing one fish, it could help to get 1-3 more males to spread out the aggression, but only if you have room without overstocking. They will still all chase each other but nobody is singled out. If you got females you would have to get 2 females per male & you would get lots of fry.

I wouldn't get anymore fish until this platy is completely better and you have 2weeks-1 month of no health problems with the fish-and I would quarantine any new fish again for 2 weeks - 1 month (longer is better). You can use the hospital tank to quarantine. That works out for me-only problem is if I'm quarantining and I need a hospital tank.
 
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