The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys. I appear to have a mild case of Ich cropping up in my tank. I have Kribenses, Rummynose Tetra, Emperor Tetra, an Oto, and some Amano shrimp. What would be the best way to treat the Ich without injuring any of the tanks other inhabitants. It seems to mainly be present on the tetras.

Thanks for your help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
The best method I've used is to raise the tank temperature. But you plants may not like this so much. I forget the magic number, just thought I'd chime in to get you started on a potentially workable solution.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,200 Posts
86 is the magic number...... BUT its not always a 100% guarentee either. And some live stock can handle it and some cant. The Amano will probably die that that high of a temp.

Did you recently add any fish??? Tank get cold? Or whats your Tanks Ammonia, Nitrite, PH, Nitrate like??? be sure to fix the issue as well.

Hospital tank in your case is my best recommendations. Then hit it with Seachem Paraguard for about a week and a half. You could try the temp raising. But some creatures my not do well with it.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,077 Posts
I have always added an airstone and raised the temp to 82 for 2 days and the down to 80 It never takes more than 7 days to get rid of it after its gone return the temp to normal. I would not recommend doing this for more than 7 days it can be harmful to some fish.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,411 Posts
There are some different types of ich which seem to be resistant to the normal treatments. Be aware that it will take a persistent aproach and you certainly don't want to quit too soon. Start sooner rather than later. The last time I bought fish from a shop, i got a bad case which spread through a whole 75 gallon before I could wake up. I finally had the temperature up to 94 and way more salt than ever recommended. They all lived but it took almost a month of slowly adjusting the temperature and adding tons of salt.

The best is a QT tank but if not available go for treating right now where they are. It can get out of hand overnight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the info everyone! For now I've raised the tank temperature to 82 degrees. I need to pick up a test kit to see if there are any oddities in the water quality. It would seem my old kit has expired...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,200 Posts
There are some different types of ich which seem to be resistant to the normal treatments. Be aware that it will take a persistent aproach and you certainly don't want to quit too soon. Start sooner rather than later. The last time I bought fish from a shop, i got a bad case which spread through a whole 75 gallon before I could wake up. I finally had the temperature up to 94 and way more salt than ever recommended. They all lived but it took almost a month of slowly adjusting the temperature and adding tons of salt.

The best is a QT tank but if not available go for treating right now where they are. It can get out of hand overnight.

I'm not sure about different types. Other then saltwater and freshwater. But creatures of all sorts do evolve and become resistant to things such as medications. Is also never recommend anyone try anything much higher the 88 degrees. After that o2 levels and temps become to much for most fish and inverts.

Temperature alone does not kill ich. It only speeds the life cycle. Some fish are harder hit then others and more sensitive. It can get into the gills and this is where it does the damage and how ich kills fish. Basically by suffocation. The general thought as to how ich kills fish is the epithelium (the top layerof thegill cells)reactsto anIch invasion by growing thicker, the result of this is a restriction of the oxygen flow from the water to the blood in the gills. The lamellae (respiratory folds of the gills) also become deformed, reducing the proper transfer of oxygen. The shear numbers of Ich trophozoites covering the gills also causes a mechanical blockageof successful oxygen transfer. These conditions combine to stress the fish by hindering respiration. The epithelial layer of the gill may also separate and cause loss of electrolytes, nutrients and fluids from the fish, making it difficult fortheinfected fish to regulate the water concentration in its body. Bacteria and fungus may also invade the fish more easily while it is stressed from the Ich infection.


Here is a link to a great page of info on ich and tons about it

http://www.americanaquariumproducts.com/Aquarium_Ich.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,411 Posts
I probably did not make my answer as specific as needed. I did not mean different types of ich but there is information about differing types of other life living inside the ich. I won't attempt to say what the difference is as that is sure to raise many more small misstatements on my part.

I find the main cause of death when dealing with ich which can't be cured quickly is the resulting secondary infections as a result of the openings in the protective layers of the fish. Ich, untreated almost always is followed by fungus or other disease.

Either way it is important to start treating for ich as soon as it is noticed. I find heat and salt as reliable as anything but sometimes the suggested levels of each do not do the job so one has the option of using more of each, which may kill the fish, or letting the fish die. Depends on the perceived value of the fish which path to follow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Hey guys. I appear to have a mild case of Ich cropping up in my tank. I have Kribenses, Rummynose Tetra, Emperor Tetra, an Oto, and some Amano shrimp. What would be the best way to treat the Ich without injuring any of the tanks other inhabitants. It seems to mainly be present on the tetras.

Thanks for your help!
When I had an ich breakout on my 20L I had some amanos and oto in there as well. If you decide to medicate, make sure you use non-copper based medication, and only dose about 1/3 of recommended dose since shrimps and otos are fairly sensitive. Raising temperature would also help.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top