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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I bit the bullet and bought a ph monitor. I was just sick of using that dropper. I did my research for a while and wanted a controller not a monitor but I dont have a co2 system and wasnt sure if I would get one. So I was torn between a milwaukee controller or the american marine ph monitor. So I bid on a used monitor for $52 and got it. Of coarse the description said the probe was recently replaced and what not. But when it arrived the probe had no cap on the tip to keep it moist and it is reading about 1.00 ph lower then my tank and tap are. So my question is, obviously it needs to be calibrated, but if it came dry then is the prbe no good now? And if I do buy a new probe should I buy one from hong kong for $18 or US for $35? I just think anything from hong kong is going to be sketchy but everything now a days comes from china.......
 

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pH Importance

Hello Drew...

Are you keeping and breeding rare fish? Because if you aren't, then you don't need to fret over the acidity or alkalinity of your tap water. The vast majority of aquarium fish will adapt to the vast majority of public water supplies. Our fish will thrive in a pH between 6 - 8.5 as long as the level is stable.

Just treat the tap water and remove the ammonia, chlorine and chloramine and don't get creative in an attempt to change the water pH and your fish will adapt. They've been doing this since the hobby started.

Just a couple of thougths.

B
 

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Hello Drew...

Are you keeping and breeding rare fish? Because if you aren't, then you don't need to fret over the acidity or alkalinity of your tap water. The vast majority of aquarium fish will adapt to the vast majority of public water supplies. Our fish will thrive in a pH between 6 - 8.5 as long as the level is stable.

Just treat the tap water and remove the ammonia, chlorine and chloramine and don't get creative in an attempt to change the water pH and your fish will adapt. They've been doing this since the hobby started.

Just a couple of thougths.

B

I agree
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks guys. I am keeping dwarf shrimp, and planning on getting more sensitve ones like crystal red shrimp that need around 6.5ph pretty stable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ph in tank is about 7.2, GH 6-7, KH 2-3, TDS 380. All a little high for crs.
My tap is 7.8, GH 5-6, KH 2-3, TDS 220.
i cant seem to get the KH and TDS down. I dont want to do an RO system but was thinking of getting the tap water filter. If I do that would I just mix like half tap with half filtered or whatever will get my levels down?
 

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Ph in tank is about 7.2, GH 6-7, KH 2-3, TDS 380. All a little high for crs.
My tap is 7.8, GH 5-6, KH 2-3, TDS 220.
i cant seem to get the KH and TDS down. I dont want to do an RO system but was thinking of getting the tap water filter. If I do that would I just mix like half tap with half filtered or whatever will get my levels down?
A tap water filter is not going to change TDS or pH to the degree that you want. As hoppy stated in my post about my under sink filter, for that to happen you need a slow moving filtration system like what is found in RO systems. An idea to get around RO may be to use a Brita pitcher filter as they use gravity and the weight of the water to push water through the filter and into the pitcher.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Nice, Thanks for that thread. I took that idea and just added a bunch on peat into where you add water into the brita pitcher, put a rock on top of the peat to keep it down. Slow drip water over the rock. Im getting awesome results.
Im down to 6.5ph, 3-4 gh, 0-1 kh and 140 tds. Its almost too good of results, I guess I have to let it sit and test it later tho.
 
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