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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi again,
I just wanted to clear up some more questions, hope y'all don't mind too much!!! First off maybe this is silly but when dosing fertilizers do you just add them in at the top of the water or do you try to put them close to the plants lol? Next question will my betta fish be able to tolerate CO2 dosing okay?? And lastly I have a filter going but should I also get an air stone going for the betta fish when dosing CO2 or would this just be a waste? As a side note this is a 3 gallon tank so I'm wary of overdosing things.
Thanks again guys! -Heidi


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Ferts can be just added to the water. Adding near the water output of the filter will help circulate faster but they will make their way around the tank either way.

I would stick with a filter if going the CO2 route. The pH swing is what you are trying to combat when dosing CO2 to not stress the fish. THis is typically done by turning on the co2 a little before the lights and turning off the co2 a bit before the lights go off.
 

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There's no such thing as a silly question I put my ferts in front of my pump so it gets spread around,next the co2 with a 3 gallon tank be careful ,is this diy co2 or pressurized.If you put an airstone you are defeating the co2.You can have a plush planted tank without co2,just pick the plants that will work for you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys for answering my questions . One more I promise! So my set up is a fluval mini co2 kit, the problem I'm having is that the diffuser is just too large for the tank. Can I hook the CO2 up to an air stone to diffuse instead? Here's a video of what it looks like, the tiny bubbles are the CO2 hooked up to my air stone instead and my power head is blowing them around the tank. https://vimeo.com/166118048


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So what all do you need to regulate CO2 levels? Would just a drop checker be sufficient? Or do I need a bubble counter too?


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You mean that huge diffuser didn't integrate a bubble counter and an espresso machine?

I would definitely get a drop checker. I mean you could count the bubbles before you connect the tubing to the diffuser, but it's kind of a pain. Also if you have fish I wouldn't run the diffuser at night until you get a handle on the co2, even then you have to be careful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
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You mean that huge diffuser didn't integrate a bubble counter and an espresso machine?



I would definitely get a drop checker. I mean you could count the bubbles before you connect the tubing to the diffuser, but it's kind of a pain. Also if you have fish I wouldn't run the diffuser at night until you get a handle on the co2, even then you have to be careful.


Haha maybe it does but I couldn't even get the darn thing in the tank! Lol!
So how many hours and bps should I be running this thing a day considering it's such a small tank? Thank you again for answering my questions !!
 

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You mean that huge diffuser didn't integrate a bubble counter and an espresso machine?

I would definitely get a drop checker. I mean you could count the bubbles before you connect the tubing to the diffuser, but it's kind of a pain. Also if you have fish I wouldn't run the diffuser at night until you get a handle on the co2, even then you have to be careful.
Every time I see a nano tank you respond. I can see this is becoming your specialty haha
 

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You need to start slow and make all your adjustments slow! A drop checker lags way behind. You can kill your fish easily before it changes color! Some folks say bubble counters aren't needed but I think they're invaluable when getting started. With such a small tank you want to start with 1 bubble every couple of seconds. A drop checker can help zero in how much you need to increase. Wait several hours after each adjustment observing livestock for stress. The best way to zero in the final level is with an accurate ph test. Take a water sample and leave it in the open for 24 hours. Test that for ph level. Test the tank water. Most folks aim for a full point drop in ph from the de-gassed water to fully dosed water.

In the video you aren't diffusing your Co2 enough. Most of those bubble will pop at the surface and you'll end up with very little in your water. Airstones are too coarse. Someone mentioned a little cut off piece of bamboo chopstick shoved into the end of the airline. I think I have also heard of people using a cigarette filter. Or you could just buy a small Co2 diffuser.

An airstone will help remove your CO2. It's nice to have one if you get to much going and your fish is stressed, fire up an air pump with the airstone, get some surface agitation, CO2 will dissipate.

When you add too much CO2 the ph change has no affect on fish. They die from a lack of oxygen. They can't survive breathing CO2. I believe it's not as big of a deal with bettas as they can breath at the surface. (I prefaced this with "I believe" because I'm not sure. Some other folks have already given some advice in this thread as fact that could kill your fish. Check with others who are more betta savvy.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You need to start slow and make all your adjustments slow! A drop checker lags way behind. You can kill your fish easily before it changes color! Some folks say bubble counters aren't needed but I think they're invaluable when getting started. With such a small tank you want to start with 1 bubble every couple of seconds. A drop checker can help zero in how much you need to increase. Wait several hours after each adjustment observing livestock for stress. The best way to zero in the final level is with an accurate ph test. Take a water sample and leave it in the open for 24 hours. Test that for ph level. Test the tank water. Most folks aim for a full point drop in ph from the de-gassed water to fully dosed water.



In the video you aren't diffusing your Co2 enough. Most of those bubble will pop at the surface and you'll end up with very little in your water. Airstones are too coarse. Someone mentioned a little cut off piece of bamboo chopstick shoved into the end of the airline. I think I have also heard of people using a cigarette filter. Or you could just buy a small Co2 diffuser.



An airstone will help remove your CO2. It's nice to have one if you get to much going and your fish is stressed, fire up an air pump with the airstone, get some surface agitation, CO2 will dissipate.



When you add too much CO2 the ph change has no affect on fish. They die from a lack of oxygen. They can't survive breathing CO2. I believe it's not as big of a deal with bettas as they can breath at the surface. (I prefaced this with "I believe" because I'm not sure. Some other folks have already given some advice in this thread as fact that could kill your fish. Check with others who are more betta savvy.)


Okay this is a stupid question for sure lol... But where does the bubble counter actually connect and how? Do you cut a slit in your tubing and put some fluid into it and attach both ends of the tubing then to it?
 

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Okay this is a stupid question for sure lol... But where does the bubble counter actually connect and how? Do you cut a slit in your tubing and put some fluid into it and attach both ends of the tubing then to it?
In-line after the CO2 regulator and before the diffuser/bubbler. Recommend that you place the bubble counter somewhere you can easily view while adjusting CO2 bubble rate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
You need to start slow and make all your adjustments slow! A drop checker lags way behind. You can kill your fish easily before it changes color! Some folks say bubble counters aren't needed but I think they're invaluable when getting started. With such a small tank you want to start with 1 bubble every couple of seconds. A drop checker can help zero in how much you need to increase. Wait several hours after each adjustment observing livestock for stress. The best way to zero in the final level is with an accurate ph test. Take a water sample and leave it in the open for 24 hours. Test that for ph level. Test the tank water. Most folks aim for a full point drop in ph from the de-gassed water to fully dosed water.



In the video you aren't diffusing your Co2 enough. Most of those bubble will pop at the surface and you'll end up with very little in your water. Airstones are too coarse. Someone mentioned a little cut off piece of bamboo chopstick shoved into the end of the airline. I think I have also heard of people using a cigarette filter. Or you could just buy a small Co2 diffuser.



An airstone will help remove your CO2. It's nice to have one if you get to much going and your fish is stressed, fire up an air pump with the airstone, get some surface agitation, CO2 will dissipate.



When you add too much CO2 the ph change has no affect on fish. They die from a lack of oxygen. They can't survive breathing CO2. I believe it's not as big of a deal with bettas as they can breath at the surface. (I prefaced this with "I believe" because I'm not sure. Some other folks have already given some advice in this thread as fact that could kill your fish. Check with others who are more betta savvy.)


I just wanted to clarify this by a "full drop point" do you mean from say 7.6 pH to 6.6 pH? And this doesn't harm the fish?
 

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I just wanted to clarify this by a "full drop point" do you mean from say 7.6 pH to 6.6 pH? And this doesn't harm the fish?
That's correct. That 1 full point drop is what most people seem to aim for. The Co2 induced drop does not harm the fish.
I don't use a drop checker now, but it's only because mine leaks and I haven't replaced it. I like having one, and I think it's a good, inexpensive tool when starting out. Just keep in mind that they may not be completely accurate and they take quite a while to respond to the change but it does give you a more "active" response then checking the ph all the time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Do any of you have experience growing DHG is caribsea Eco complete? I'm worried that the granules may not be fine enough, it has more of the consistency of gravel. I'm not sure how well the roots will take place.


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