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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just did a re-scape, and 2 hours later all my sakura shrimp are dead or dying (apart from three)...

I've been trying and trying to work out what i did that could of killed of so many of my shrimp. So i will go through what i did, maybe somebody might know.

3 day's ago my light blew so i bought another, not aquarium specific (don't sell the right size at my lfs), it's a general daylight fluorescent from B&Q, the bulb worked fine so i started the re-scape. The shrimp were fine during all this as they still had daylight.

I got some cabomba an anubias nana and some dhg.

I took out 50% of the water so that planting the dhg would be easier

I planted the dhg with stainless steel tweaser.

I tied the anubias to driftwood (pre-soked) with cotton thread and put it in the tank.

I then starting planting the cabomba, i noticed that when i planted the cabomba huge bubbles came out of the substrate (flourite black sand), so when i first saw my shrimp dying my immediate thought was that these had killed the shrimp, but on furture thought i noticed that my fish were fine (neon's and otto's) and my substrate had only been in theh tank for 8 days.

During the whole process my shrimp were fine.

once everything was planted i turned the light off and left the tank for a couple of hours to let things settle. When i came back i saw that some of my shrimp had become trapped in between the glass and the thermometer, when i saw this i moved the thermometer so that the shrimp were free but to my horror all of the shrimp that were on the thermometer or trapped just fell on their backs to the substrate below some of them swam fantically on their backs to the top and then just fell back down, other lay their with their legs moving, at this very moment i have one alive on driftwood but i don't think it will survive as every time it swims it falls back down, and i have one swimming normally and another crawling slowly accorss the substrate.

If anyone thinks they know what might of happend then please do share it no matter how stupid you might think it is, i really don't want these shrimp to die in vain.

I hope i wrote this clear enough and i'm sorry if i didn't.
 

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Is it possible the plants were treated with some kind of snail remover or other chemical at the pet store? One of my LFS dips all their plants in a copper sulfate solution to eliminate snails.

Other than what everyone else is saying, that's the only thing that comes to mind. Sorry about the shrimp.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I don't know if my eyes are decieving my but i just put some of the shrimp that were still moving their legs and some that weren't into so new same temp water and to my astonishment some of them are starting to get back on their feet.
 

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I think your rescape released some level of ammonia from your gravel and yr 50% water change could have changed your water parameters quite drastically.
Your shrimps are in shock too. Lol.
Anyway, I did rescaping before very slowly, working in slow motion, still I stirred up the gravel abit and water turned kinda dusty. But did not encounter any casualties with the cherry shrimps.
However, there was once when I tried to vacuum the residue in one of my tanks back compartment, I forgot to turn off the filter and hola, my water went from clear to super dusty and very soon after, one of my CRS jumped out of the tank and the rest in the tank freezed in shock.
My guess is still the water condition degraded or changes too drastically that caused your shrimps problems.
I hope things are better now for ya.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The one that i managed to save (about 6) are recovering slowly, they're start to walk around now but i'm still worried about them.

Thanks for the help everyone :icon_smil
 

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It sounds like either an ammonia spike or hydrogen sulfide was released from the substrate. Shrimp are more subsceptible than the fish since they're mainly bottom dwellers.
 

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I take everything out when I rescape just so I don't have any spikes of anything. I just setup a small tank with the Fluval substrate and I've been poking at it for 3 days with a chopstick and still getting airbubbles released, so you always want to make sure the substrate has no pockets for anything to build up in, and all the mulm and all the food and dead plant matter that settles in the substrate may sit fine and slowly decay and release small amounts of ammonia in the substrate over time but you stir all that up, it can cause a big spike that the filter nor the critters are ready for.
 

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It sounds like either an ammonia spike or hydrogen sulfide was released from the substrate. Shrimp are more subsceptible than the fish since they're mainly bottom dwellers.
This would be my guess as well. Fine grained substrate like sands are more likely to have sulfide buildup, especially if it is deep or your plants aren't dense enough to oxygenate it. Not only that, but stirring up a lot of junk from the bottom can also give you an unexpected ammonia spike, which would be lethal.
One thing I can say for sure is that anytime I see signs of stress in my fish or shrimp I spring into action immediately and do a 50% to 75% water change right away. It is almost always something bad in the water and a quick response has saved my tank every time.
Lastly, as previously stated, your shrimp will be much more sensitive to water parameters than your fish. You may lose all your shrimp without the fish even showing signs of stress yet.
 

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Since your substrate released bubbles I'm guessing you put it in dry. This can cause a lot of problems in itself because you get pockets of air,

Personally I use black flourite sand mixed w/ tahitian moon sand and have had mo problems, but mine went in wet.

Sent from my DROID2 GLOBAL using Tapatalk
 

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Since your substrate released bubbles I'm guessing you put it in dry. This can cause a lot of problems in itself because you get pockets of air,

Personally I use black flourite sand mixed w/ tahitian moon sand and have had mo problems, but mine went in wet.

Sent from my DROID2 GLOBAL using Tapatalk
Pockets of air are not a bad thing.
They will slowly dissolve into the water, no problem.
The issue is when there is a lack of oxygen, which air obviously isnt, and you get anaerobic areas in the soil.
These wont be there in new soil, nor can we assume they will show up where an air pocket formed when you dumped the soil.
Anaerobic bacteria avoid oxygen and produce many chemicals and gasses that our livestock don't like.
 
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