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So I'm unsure which subforum this would be most appropriate in so I just put it in equipment since what you sit your tank on is just as much equipment as anything else I suppose! I ended up getting that 10g tank to add to my growing collection and I've set it on a kind of two way window sill in the kitchen alongside my 5g shrimp tank that I've had there for a while. I tend to overthink things and always think about the worst possible scenario and now that its there I'm worried that maybe 150 pounds of water is too much for that space to handle. This might be a completely unfounded concern but I was wondering if there was any known way that I can tell how much weight a structure like that could support without doing some kind of damage to it. Attached is a picture of the setup so you can see what I mean, apologies for the mess!
 

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So I'm unsure which subforum this would be most appropriate in so I just put it in equipment since what you sit your tank on is just as much equipment as anything else I suppose! I ended up getting that 10g tank to add to my growing collection and I've set it on a kind of two way window sill in the kitchen alongside my 5g shrimp tank that I've had there for a while. I tend to overthink things and always think about the worst possible scenario and now that its there I'm worried that maybe 150 pounds of water is too much for that space to handle. This might be a completely unfounded concern but I was wondering if there was any known way that I can tell how much weight a structure like that could support without doing some kind of damage to it. Attached is a picture of the setup so you can see what I mean, apologies for the mess!
Knock on the wall below it...can u hear the wood column? If you knock and looks like theres nothing inside, can be an issue.

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Sounds like regular old empty drywall to me. But maybe I'm just slow. So theres a little crack right where the wood its sitting on meets the wall and I can see straight through it... which isn't helping my fears haha
Knock all over the wall, the wood pilar will be in a specific area, thats where u want to stand your aquarium over.

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That wall isn't just an empty space of drywall. If that was the case, any weight at all would be enough to collapse it. There are absolutely studs and a cap beam in the wall, likely directly under the stone counter to support it. No house is built to have a counter support less than 200+ lbs otherwise it would collapse just by having some people sit on it. That "crack" you're seeing is just poor craftsmanship on the joint filler/drywall.

Your tank will be fine.

You also just said yourself that the counter is sitting on wood (the cap beam). Typical spacing of wood studs is 16" center to center. So that beam definitely has elements supporting it behind the drywall.
 

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Go get a cheap stud finder and check where your support is but I wouldn't worry about it. Those two little tanks are not even going to come close to being able to collapse the support for that counter. You can also just knock on the wall and you should be able to tell how many studs there are. Generally 16 inches on Center.
 

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That wall isn't just an empty space of drywall. If that was the case, any weight at all would be enough to collapse it. There are absolutely studs and a cap beam in the wall, likely directly under the stone counter to support it. No house is built to have a counter support less than 200+ lbs otherwise it would collapse just by having some people sit on it. That "crack" you're seeing is just poor craftsmanship on the joint filler/drywall.

Your tank will be fine.

You also just said yourself that the counter is sitting on wood (the cap beam). Typical spacing of wood studs is 16" center to center. So that beam definitely has elements supporting it behind the drywall.
I'm inclined to agree that if it is a builder built counter then it should easily support an "average american" or two, which is pretty heavy. If it's a DIY counter, be very very careful.
 

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If you think of an easy way to nail together a short wall like that and how to make it difficult, which would a builder choose? The easy way if it fits the local code!
That leaves it easy to see building the wall as a simple rectangle with a stud or two where it meets the main wall and then more studs every 16 inches along the short wall. Framing guys can almost look at a stud and tell you where 16,32, and 48 are going to be so they are not going to cheap out and try to make it some different number between studs. US tape measures come with those point having special marks so we can find them--- just in case it was built by a "new guy"!
That leaves the left side of the tank setting directly on one or possibly doubled studs and another just 16 inch out, so the tank is nearly on top of two 2X4 capped with a 2X and then the countertop.
The corner crack? Things just move enough to crack the sheet rock mud at the corner. Looking at the picture, that is even less worry as it is simply a trim board with a sliver out of the side and only serves as an easy way to hide the rough cut edge of the drywall which is then attached to the horizontal wood underneath.
NO hazard at all.
 
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