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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First I gave a few fishing lessons.



So if fishing is not good, we get bored real quick. Wood hunting might be better or at least more exciting. I wonder why the good one is always at the other side?




At least we do know we can catch some "big 'uns"?

There seems to be plenty to find.



Actually we caught no fish but came out much better than expected. We found some nice wood and as we crossed back over the small spring branch at the end of this small cove I spotted some really nice red plants and scooped a few of them out of the muck to bring back.
Hot, tired, wet, and muddy but with wood and plants! How much better could a day be?
 

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Pixel Prestidigitator
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That is a perfect way to spend a Saturday. It was raining here Saturday so we didn't do much. Today however my 4 year old was out with me in the garage "working". Too windy for fishing.
 

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Why are all the tree's destroyed there? I've always tried to look in streams and brooks over here but I never see any plants, or fish for that matter!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Why are all the tree's destroyed there? I've always tried to look in streams and brooks over here but I never see any plants, or fish for that matter!
The large amount of dead wood is a combination of planning and luck. The dead trees are due to the age of the lake in large part. This is a manmade lake filled about 1980. So that has given the trees which were flooded about 30-40 years to gradually die and then become unstable enough to break and fall into the water. Then once in the water, they spend a good long time drifting from one shore to the other before finally getting pushed up during some high water period.
When I discuss finding dead wood, I often find people thinking dead wood is dry after a year or two. To get truly dry wood, I find 20 years is a far safer bet.

Then there is some amount of planning involved in my hunt. I find I can improve my odds a great deal by doing some study before heading out. Prevailing winds in an area dictate where the largest amount of driftwood will wind up being pushed up. The prevailing wind is normally from the Southwest in the Central US. So for the best picking, I head to the coves on the Northeast side.
A ten year drought then makes it a lot easier to get to the wood without getting wet!
 

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The large amount of dead wood is a combination of planning and luck. The dead trees are due to the age of the lake in large part. This is a manmade lake filled about 1980. So that has given the trees which were flooded about 30-40 years to gradually die and then become unstable enough to break and fall into the water. Then once in the water, they spend a good long time drifting from one shore to the other before finally getting pushed up during some high water period.
When I discuss finding dead wood, I often find people thinking dead wood is dry after a year or two. To get truly dry wood, I find 20 years is a far safer bet.

Then there is some amount of planning involved in my hunt. I find I can improve my odds a great deal by doing some study before heading out. Prevailing winds in an area dictate where the largest amount of driftwood will wind up being pushed up. The prevailing wind is normally from the Southwest in the Central US. So for the best picking, I head to the coves on the Northeast side.
A ten year drought then makes it a lot easier to get to the wood without getting wet!
The perfect conditions for scavenging then! Its a bit wet here at the moment but in the summer it drys up a lot, although the biggest lake round here has warning signs up saying do not enter the water! Something to do with an algae with toxins or along them lines so im not sure I would be putting it in my tank!
 
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