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Hello all, new to this forum but wanted to ask if any of you can suggest some tips to kind of reviving a stem plant that arrived looking pretty beat up after being shipped in three days (given I'm not as surprised with its condition considering 3 days of shipping.)

The plant I ordered is Ludwigia Natans Super Reds, the bundles were just in a deflated plastic bag with no water and they were kind of smooshed from being placed at the bottom of the box. The young topmost leaves looked shriveled, delicate and almost melted and there was a tun of leaf shedding. I immediately put them in a bowl of my tank water after which the water turned green from melted plant juices.

My question is, what is the best course of action to try and revive these plants if they all don't melt from shock in the next few days-week? I noticed a few roots on the stem bottoms, should I trim the stems down some to remove leaves that the plant would waste energy on trying to sustain?

Any tips are appreciated as I'm new to ordering plants online.

Thanks and happy Aquascaping!
 

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Carpe Diem
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Welcome to TPT.

Trim off all decay and broken leaves and then let the plants float on the surface.
Shame about the shipping. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for the tip!

I had removed the dead leaves last night but didn't think to float plants on the surface, that makes sense to kind of acclimate the plants to emersed life.

Unfortunately, as I was removing dead leaves I found that 2/3 of the plant stems were pretty much brown mush already, not sure if that is normal based on other's experience with shipping...
 

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Carpe Diem
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No, the person who shipped the plants does not know how to do it. 3 days in the mail is no big deal.

As long as the plants have 3-5 leaves remaining at the top they have a chance.
 
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Healthy plants packed properly wont even blink spending 3-4 days in a box - as long as the temps are moderate. When temps are are extreme (hot is far worse) things can get dicey spending an extra day or two.

Also in hot or cold weather it is most important that the customer bring the package inside right away as soon as it is delivered. The trip itself is usually OK, most damage happens when they spend 3-4 hours in a 100 degree mailbox before being brought inside. Not saying this applies to you, just for general info
 

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natans is an outdated name referring to L. repens. Correct species name for what you have is palustris, as far as we know.
 

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always float everything first. uprooting plants is traumatic and they need time to bounce back. I don't plant anything in the substrate until after it dies back and produces new growth. Rarely if ever does what grew at the nursery survive in my tanks. It has to adjust to the inevitably new parameters. They do everything on an immense scale and our home tanks are usually smaller/just different. I float them in a sump away from the fish ideally as soft leaf stem plants like that can be seen as food by our fish friends. It's logical really every other time we put stuff in the tank it's usually food so they might pick at it especially if you don't feed them heavy anyway. However if you have a big clump/mat of plants just toss it in the display for a week or 2 until you see some healthy new growth growing emergent out of the surface of the water. Then sink it with a rock and after it settles into it's new life on the bottom of the tank start trimming if you must. I say that as someone who prefers the less contrived more natural look but really i generally feel most people spend way too much time physically in their tanks "scaping" or "decorating" when really most of these plants and animals thrive on neglect. They're delicate. As is everything in the hobby. Glass, plants, fish, eggs - it's all so delicate, less is more. Such is any exercise in delayed gratification. Big spectacular tanks take years of dedication. All those aquascape contest winning tanks aren't even running for more than a couple days - not long enough for the plats to die back, re-adjust, and grow back healthy as a part of a balanced eco-system. Don't believe the hype.
 

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... I say that as someone who prefers the less contrived more natural look but really i generally feel most people spend way too much time physically in their tanks "scaping" or "decorating" when really most of these plants and animals thrive on neglect. They're delicate. As is everything in the hobby. Glass, plants, fish, eggs - it's all so delicate, less is more. Such is any exercise in delayed gratification. Big spectacular tanks take years of dedication. All those aquascape contest winning tanks aren't even running for more than a couple days - not long enough for the plats to die back, re-adjust, and grow back healthy as a part of a balanced eco-system. Don't believe the hype.
huh!
 

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Depending on the plant I dont float anything that is usually planted. I trim off anything not doing well, divide up as necessary, plant where I want it, and take into consideration the plant may melt back. Depending on what type it may melt all the way and start anew. Thats just my low tech experience.

The first planting I try to keep them in the same spot undisturbed until they start growing new leaves by which time the roots are probably doing well also.
 

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Put stems in the ground immediately. Thats the fastest way to have them recover, and ideally take off without missing much of a beat. There's no good reason to ever float stems that you buy if they can be planted in the substrate.

If you're not ready to plant when you get them, weigh them down so they sink and stand vertically, with a lead weight or in pot or whatever. Its important to have them standing up straight. Most things can hang around like that for a while with no problem
 

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always float everything first. uprooting plants is traumatic and they need time to bounce back. I don't plant anything in the substrate until after it dies back and produces new growth. Rarely if ever does what grew at the nursery survive in my tanks. It has to adjust to the inevitably new parameters. They do everything on an immense scale and our home tanks are usually smaller/just different. I float them in a sump away from the fish ideally as soft leaf stem plants like that can be seen as food by our fish friends. It's logical really every other time we put stuff in the tank it's usually food so they might pick at it especially if you don't feed them heavy anyway. However if you have a big clump/mat of plants just toss it in the display for a week or 2 until you see some healthy new growth growing emergent out of the surface of the water. Then sink it with a rock and after it settles into it's new life on the bottom of the tank start trimming if you must. I say that as someone who prefers the less contrived more natural look but really i generally feel most people spend way too much time physically in their tanks "scaping" or "decorating" when really most of these plants and animals thrive on neglect. They're delicate. As is everything in the hobby. Glass, plants, fish, eggs - it's all so delicate, less is more. Such is any exercise in delayed gratification. Big spectacular tanks take years of dedication. All those aquascape contest winning tanks aren't even running for more than a couple days - not long enough for the plats to die back, re-adjust, and grow back healthy as a part of a balanced eco-system. Don't believe the hype.

I completely disagree with about everything you just said.
 

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Carpe Diem
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Hi @burr740, we are on the subject of half-dead stems (and challenge stems) and there is some logic (and experience) behind my advice.

Please consider that a floating stem is a) closest to the light b) closest to atmospheric co2 c) arguably, in the best circulation d) wants to grow roots for anchor. In other words, is in the best possible conditions for survival.

That said, I'm out of this conversation.
 
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Hi @burr740, we are on the subject of half-dead stems (and challenge stems) and there is some logic (and experience) behind my advice.

Please consider that a floating stem is a) closest to the light b) closest to atmospheric co2 c) arguably, in the best circulation d) wants to grow roots for anchor. In other words, is in the best possible conditions for survival.

That said, I'm out of this conversation.
Oh you're absolutely right, I wasnt even thinking of you when I replied. Should've quote the other guy.

Or clarified that I meant in general, when you buy fresh cut stems in the mail.

Because the other new guy took the bad advice in the other post and ran with it. My post was geared toward that whole side of the conversation. Im sorry for any misunderstanding! :)
 
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