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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey All,

I just started my 1st plant tank and got some cool looking plants at the LFS that the owner pretty much gave me. I have been reading up on them a little but wanted to know what is a good way to plant them? I attached a pic showing how I planted them in my tank cause thats how they were planted at the store, but I was wondering if that was the best way? Or if splitting the bunch up and planting like 3 or some blades in different areas was better?

If anyone has experience working with this plant or just knows how to handle them your advice would be greatly appreciated.

And also if you looking in the pic I have moss growing on this thing that came with the moss when I got it. I want to move the moss to a piece of drift wood but did not know if it was okay to just like rip it off of what it is on or if there was a certain way of taking it off?

Thanks.
 

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hey, welcome to PTN! first of all, you should make sure you have the right conditions to grow it. is that a sterile black gravel substrate, or black flourite or something? I use eco-complete, it's worked really well for me, and i know a lot of other people like it too. you might want to get a little more than one bag for a 10g though. Thats what i have, and i wish i had a deeper substrate.

also, what kind of lighting/CO2 do you have?

as for planting lilaeopsis, it depends what you want to do with it. if you want it to totally fill in an area, then spread it out into 3 or so nodes and spread them out a little. if you just want them in one smaller spot, but really thick really quickly (probably not what you want at the moment), then you can plant them like that but closer together. If i were you, i'd go for the first way.

Then for the moss, you can rip up in any way and itll grow back. most people have a problem keeping mosses out of their tanks, because itll always grow back. actually, some landscapers put land-mosses in the blender with some water and organic-ish glue, and use it as paint, so it will grow back and cover the surface that its applied to. so get some thin cotton thread, rip the moss off of the coconut shell (coconuts are for hamsters and breeding cichlids, not planted tanks ;) ), and tie it around your piece of driftwood. by the time the cotton thread rots away, the moss will be attached to the driftwood (although that method does NOT work with rocks).

also, try to put taller plants like the stems you have in clumps of the same species in the back of your tank, and the shorter plants (like lilaeopsis) in the front. finding good mid-ground plants can be difficult though. try to find some Cryptocorynes or similar slower-growing plants for that area of the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hey thanks for all the information. I bought a piece of driftwood yesterday at the LFS and currently it has been soaking in water for about 12 hours now. But after its pretty much done tannin or whatever its called I am going to do what you said and use the cotton string (like sewing thread i guess) to tie it down.

As for the substrate goes I am just using that sterile black gravel stuff. Since this is my first planted tank I am finding out a lot of different things that I probably should have done. But thats they whole point of learning I guess. I think either tonight or tomorrow I will put the moss on the driftwood and separate the bunches of Lilaeopsis that I have to try get some ground coverage with its growth.

The lighting that I a currently using is an 18" Life-Glo 15W T8 6700K that I also got at the LFS and the CO2 is a DIY yeast/sugar 2L bottle filled about 1/3rd of the way with water. It produces about 20 or more bubbles a min.

Thanks for all the advice and I looking forward to getting more as time passes. I will keep posting updates with the tank so you can give me some constructive criticism to make my tank even better :smile: .

Thanks.
 
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