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How to install a pump inside a reactor?

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I want to install a submersible pump inside an RG reactor, but how do you install the power cord so that it comes out of the chamber? Is there a valve that allows passage of the socket plug?

I know I can install a powerhead inside the aquarium, but I don't have the space for that inside a 10 gallon tank.
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There are rubber-type fittings to let you do this but considering the number of times I need to clean and maintain pumps, I'm not one to recommend sealing the motor in the reactor. Perhaps out to the side where I could get to it?
 

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There was a thread in the DIY section about making an inline heater with a regular tank heater and PVC. The same parts would apply. Although like above, if you seal it in the reactor you'll have to destroy your reactor to get to it again. Why not make it external to the reactor for convenience?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Space is a consideration for this project since it avoids using a lot of fittings to connect the pump to the reactor. Too many fittings takes up too much space and it looks hideous. An internal pump would look a lot better.

I was thinking of attaching the pump to the top of the reactor lid so simply unscrewing the lid will make accessing the pump easy.

But I'll look into the inline heater thread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The powerhead/pump must be mounted on the inflow of the reactor to push water through. It shouldn't be mounted on the outflow since this creates a vacuum which lowers the internal pressure. I'm trying to increase internal pressure to increase dissolution rate.

About the cord grip, I've looked for this a long time ago but gave up since I didn't know how it functioned for my use. How am I supposed to put the large plug through those things? Do I have to cut the plug off first, then slide the cord through, and reattach the plug?
 

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So after I reconnect the cord to the plug, will it look ugly?
It will not be as small as the current plug if that is the molded plastic type. The replacement plugs often have to have space for the wires to be attached to screws. That normally is larger and can be less "finished " looking. Ugly ? Depends on how much you want it done. Canes are ugly until we need one to walk, in which case they become beautiful! :eek:
The second way would be to remove the cord at the pump end but that is often molded in place to make it water tight.
 

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Reactors shouldn't need a pump inside. The water flow going downward is enough turbulence to allow the water to absort all the CO2.

If there is CO2 escaping then I'd recommend building a Cerges reactor (what AlaskaJeff posted). I built one for my 12 gallon for about $30 and one for my 190 gallon for $80.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Reactors shouldn't need a pump inside. The water flow going downward is enough turbulence to allow the water to absort all the CO2.

If there is CO2 escaping then I'd recommend building a Cerges reactor (what AlaskaJeff posted). I built one for my 12 gallon for about $30 and one for my 190 gallon for $80.
The principle of dissolution isn't just about turbulence but also about pressure. Failing to have adequate pressure allows small bubbles to escape. Adding bioballs, which were part of the original design, accomplishes this. But since there are no bioballs, the cerges is actually less efficient than people think, which is why it's gotten ridiculously long to make up for that inefficiency. Do you really think Coca-Cola swirls their soda around with CO2 to carbonate? They don't. They carbonate by adding CO2 under lots of pressure.
 

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The principle of dissolution isn't just about turbulence but also about pressure. Failing to have adequate pressure allows small bubbles to escape. Adding bioballs, which were part of the original design, accomplishes this. But since there are no bioballs, the cerges is actually less efficient than people think, which is why it's gotten ridiculously long to make up for that inefficiency. Do you really think Coca-Cola swirls their soda around with CO2 to carbonate? They don't. They carbonate by adding CO2 under lots of pressure.
I have 2 Cerges which work great (one low flow and one very high), neither allow bubbles into the tank. If you add pressure it will help the CO2 dissolve but once that pressure is relieved (popping the top on a Coke can) you'll get a quick release of a lot of that CO2 (wasted). I'm not saying it won't help but I think it does more harm than good by reducing output of your return pump.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Why would that pressure be relieved? Why why I open the reactor while it's still running? That doesn't make any sense. The water in our tanks is never over-saturated. The gas will not condense into bubbles the moment pressure is relieved. It's not like a soda bottle.
 
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