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Just got my new canister filter and trying to figure out how to integrate CO2. In my HOB, I just inserted a CO2 airline tube into the intake and would hear a tick noise as the bubbles passed the impeller. They had a direct path to the impeller.

With the canister filter, the inlet water traverses the chamber before being picked back up by the outlet tube. When I added CO2 to the inlet, I was not hearing the tick of the impeller like normal. If I up the CO2, then I get a slight cavitation every few seconds. I really have to be blasting CO2 for this though.

Is there a way to properly inject CO2 into a canister filter?
 

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Just got my new canister filter and trying to figure out how to integrate CO2. In my HOB, I just inserted a CO2 airline tube into the intake and would hear a tick noise as the bubbles passed the impeller. They had a direct path to the impeller.

With the canister filter, the inlet water traverses the chamber before being picked back up by the outlet tube. When I added CO2 to the inlet, I was not hearing the tick of the impeller like normal. If I up the CO2, then I get a slight cavitation every few seconds. I really have to be blasting CO2 for this though.

Is there a way to properly inject CO2 into a canister filter?
I know that somehow it could be possible, but do yourself a favor and get a reactor.
Either Cerges, or Rex Grigg reactor will work and you'll be much happier with the result.
With proper surface agitation, I can get enough Co2 flow into my cerge's reactor for optimal levels within 45-60 minutes of the valve opening.

This is my setup, ignore the mess this was after a long testing phase of adding and removing pieces to get the right angles. Also, I'm terrible with keeping the glue off of the pipes.
 

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Most ppl insert into the outlet line, but you have to either cut your factory line and add a diffuser inline, or replace the factory tube pwith clear tubing from H.D. or Lowes.
I also remember when I hooked up mine there was a reason not to send co2 straight to the canister. Can't remember exactly what the reason was, maybe someone else remembers.
 

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I'm having good results with an ista turbo. It can be had on the Bay's of E for about $17. Be aware that it uses 1/2"(12mm) ID tubing.
 

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I know that somehow it could be possible, but do yourself a favor and get a reactor.
Either Cerges, or Rex Grigg reactor will work and you'll be much happier with the result.
With proper surface agitation, I can get enough Co2 flow into my cerge's reactor for optimal levels within 45-60 minutes of the valve opening.

This is my setup, ignore the mess this was after a long testing phase of adding and removing pieces to get the right angles. Also, I'm terrible with keeping the glue off of the pipes.
You just gave an example of why people run inlines or resort to regular diffusers.

No offense, but that is really ugly compared to bubbles or save a few dollars on co2.
 

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Perhaps the most common mistake I see when we get into a DIY reactor is just the urge to reinvent or "improve" things that are really great if we simply follow the initial builder's plans. Every time I mention this there is an almost kneejerk reaction stating that things have to be improved! If you are an inventor and simply want to play the invent game, that is fine but if you want to build a reactor that works, don't try to improve it -----unless you do feel you are that much better than the guys who built a reactor that works so well that it has almost become the "standard" !
This is my standard for all reactors, whether it is for a 20 gallon or a 120:
https://rotalabutterfly.com/rex-grigg/diy-reactor.htm
If I find a better way to build a wheel or mousetrap, I might then try to improve the Grigg's design but I have to ask why, when it works so good when I don't try to improve it!
Maybe it's like a computer? The more garbage you put in, the more garbage you will get out?
when it works, keep it simple.
One way to make a PVC build look better is choosing better solvent as clear is really good enough for the job and blue is for high quality wet work where an extreme solvent is needed. If you are setting in a hole full of water and using wet pipe, blue is needed but not for us.
 

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You just gave an example of why people run inlines or resort to regular diffusers.

No offense, but that is really ugly compared to bubbles or save a few dollars on co2.
I was simply showing the example of what I run. Regardless, it's under my tank, in my stand where it's not seen.

The amount of Co2 I have flowing into that thing if it's even possible to get it stable with an inline/in-tank diffuser, would create a tank full of bubbles to the point you couldn't see the plants.

I run a high agitation setup to allow for very fast co2 injection, high oxygen levels, and stable replacement of that co2. My experiences of inline/in-tank diffusers says this isn't possible to get a stable co2 injection to the level that I'm taking it.
 

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I was simply showing the example of what I run. Regardless, it's under my tank, in my stand where it's not seen.

The amount of Co2 I have flowing into that thing if it's even possible to get it stable with an inline/in-tank diffuser, would create a tank full of bubbles to the point you couldn't see the plants.

I run a high agitation setup to allow for very fast co2 injection, high oxygen levels, and stable replacement of that co2. My experiences of inline/in-tank diffusers says this isn't possible to get a stable co2 injection to the level that I'm taking it.
Any time one enters a forum conversation, they are opening up an opportunity for critical comment and it should be apparent that you have to learn to live with some comments you did not ask for.
But you seem to have some pretty strange ideas on fishkeeping and do not seem to want to accept advice, so I would assume you will have a great deal of trouble getting things to work for you.
When you choose to use methods which are far off the norm, you should assume the world will not agree with what you are doing!
Good enough to me, as it is YOUR tank!
 

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Any time one enters a forum conversation, they are opening up an opportunity for critical comment and it should be apparent that you have to learn to live with some comments you did not ask for.
But you seem to have some pretty strange ideas on fishkeeping and do not seem to want to accept advice, so I would assume you will have a great deal of trouble getting things to work for you.
When you choose to use methods which are far off the norm, you should assume the world will not agree with what you are doing!
Good enough to me, as it is YOUR tank!
My Co2 reactor is one adapted from the one Immortal1 uses on this forum. High agitation is a concept that Dennis Wong talks about on how to get stable co2 quickly. Both concepts have been proven to work by seasoned hobbyists.
Moreso cerges reactors have been around for quite a while, at least 10 years because that's when I first built mine based on plans I saw on this very forum. They are far from abnormal at this point for reactor design.

I'm sorry you interpreted my post as not adhering to advice, I just wasn't asking for advice. My original intent was to guide OP into using a reactor instead of feeding the Co2 straight into their canister filter.
 

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You just gave an example of why people run inlines or resort to regular diffusers.

No offense, but that is really ugly compared to bubbles or save a few dollars on co2.
I was simply showing the example of what I run. Regardless, it's under my tank, in my stand where it's not seen.

The amount of Co2 I have flowing into that thing if it's even possible to get it stable with an inline/in-tank diffuser, would create a tank full of bubbles to the point you couldn't see the plants.

I run a high agitation setup to allow for very fast co2 injection, high oxygen levels, and stable replacement of that co2. My experiences of inline/in-tank diffusers says this isn't possible to get a stable co2 injection to the level that I'm taking it.
Understandable and makes sense. I meant no offense. But probably isn’t the level most hobbyist are at. Though bubbles annoy me, I don’t have a cabinet so reactors aren’t an option. All my stuff sits next to my tank on a peninsula. That said with an inline and goal of 25 ppm co2 I have relatively no bubbles. You must really be jacking that thing up or have no livestock so it doesn’t matter.

I’d agree a reactor is the way to go if it weren’t for a few reasons. If I had some way to hide a reactor I’d probably use one simply for one reason, to eliminate bubbles. I’m still eyeballing GLAs as it’s not too ugly, just don’t want my 2217 flow to get quashed by it. No space for a fx4 AND reactor.

As far as OP, there are only two ways - reactor or atomizer (in-line diffuser). Both will be hooked up on the outlet. I see you said inlet. There have been people experimenting with an atomizer on the inlet to eliminate bubbles. Most report no issues but there are legitimate concerns. Namely - if your filter can handle the air, long term degrade on o rings/mechanical parts of filter, and co2’s effect on beneficial bacteria. It’s kind of a grey area and I honestly don’t know these answers.

Been thinking about trying it out on a used Eheim 2213 though, just use it as a reactor and fill it will balls/foam.

Using a reactor on an inlet doesn’t see like a good idea though...reactors kill flow and killing flow before getting to the filter might mess up water being able to make it through the filter and result in ‘air lock’ but I really haven’t tried so not sure.
 

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Using a reactor on an inlet doesn’t see like a good idea though...reactors kill flow and killing flow before getting to the filter might mess up water being able to make it through the filter and result in ‘air lock’ but I really haven’t tried so not sure.
That and it can really foul up the reactor very quickly. It will become a prefilter for the filter.
 
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I ran airline tubing from my needle valve directly into the intake of my Eheim 2015. I could watch the CO2 bubble dissolve as it traveled through the clear green Eheim tubing, and was completely dissolved before it reached the canister. Easy-peasy.
 

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I ran airline tubing from my needle valve directly into the intake of my Eheim 2015. I could watch the CO2 bubble dissolve as it traveled through the clear green Eheim tubing, and was completely dissolved before it reached the canister. Easy-peasy.
If this were the case, wouldn’t the bubbles be dissolved just as easily if you placed it in the outlet? Or do you have a Ridiculously long inlet tube?
 

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I used to have a reactor under my tank but took it out after a while because I was getting worried that CO2 might have made the plastic fittings brittle over time. Now I just run the tubing next to the intake also with a diffuser at the end and let it go in to the filter.
 

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If this were the case, wouldn’t the bubbles be dissolved just as easily if you placed it in the outlet? Or do you have a Ridiculously long inlet tube?
I had a ridiculously long inlet tube. This was on my 90 gallon tank with the Eheim underneath the stand, so the CO2 bubble traveled through 6 feet of tubing before it reached the canister. The bubble was completely dissolved about halfway through.
 

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Just getting back into the game after about 6 years, but I did a similar thing on my 55 gallon. I didn't have room for a reactor in my setup at the time. Infused CO2 near the intake and had just under 6 ft of tubing going to the canister (output went straight up and into the tank so a little over 2 ft I would guess). It generally worked well for me. I did occasionally end up with CO2 in the canister leading to bubbles and some increased noise particularly when I tried to push CO2 levels. It never got to the point that I noted decreased filter function. I was running a Filstar 3.

That being said I am currently getting back in the game and now that I have more space will definitely be using a reactor.

Good luck.
 
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