The Planted Tank Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
533 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Two questions.
It's been a few years since I had a tank going. Hope to do something when summer break starts up. If I can ever find a good solid stand.
Anyway, a frustration I had back then was trying to create heighth in the back of the tank and have it stay that way. Of course, gravity pulls the gravel back down until everything is level and flat.
How do people get heighth in the back and keep it there?

Also, I would like to have some carpeting plant and then create a trail of something that would resemble a wooden walkway or even flat little slabs of petrfied wood. Way back when, when I was a kid I would attempt this, and the walkway would eventually sink and basically disappear.
Is there a trick to it? Or is it just a matter of reaching in every so often and putting the walkway back together?
I would love to avoid resin or decorations not made of natural materials.
Thank you. :0)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,799 Posts
Two questions.
It's been a few years since I had a tank going. Hope to do something when summer break starts up. If I can ever find a good solid stand.
Anyway, a frustration I had back then was trying to create heighth in the back of the tank and have it stay that way. Of course, gravity pulls the gravel back down until everything is level and flat.
How do people get heighth in the back and keep it there?

Also, I would like to have some carpeting plant and then create a trail of something that would resemble a wooden walkway or even flat little slabs of petrfied wood. Way back when, when I was a kid I would attempt this, and the walkway would eventually sink and basically disappear.
Is there a trick to it? Or is it just a matter of reaching in every so often and putting the walkway back together?
I would love to avoid resin or decorations not made of natural materials.
Thank you. :0)
To get height you basically use rocks to create terraces so substrate doesn't all just slide down its level of repose. This requires a lot of rock and/or big rocks. You can add mesh bags of lava rock/pea gravel to the very bottom to get some initial height that is then covered up with substrate and rocks.

Because of the amount of rock needed I suggest buying rock either at a landscape supply company where its significantly cheaper, or get them for free from the wild. Otherwise you will spend hundreds of dollars in rocks for even a medium sized tank.

To make a walkway I would use small wooden sticks and tiny dabs of silicone to hold them together. This will stay ontop of substrate because it will be less dense then the substrate but will be a pain to source from a retailer unless you can pick them up in the wild. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
60-P high tech, 45-P low tech
Joined
·
124 Posts
Yeah with the walkway, (stone, wood whatever you make it out of) plants growing over it would be the main concern. So you would have to constantly trim them back around it. Or you can create some clear space around it with pebbles or other small hardscape details that prevents the plants from overgrowing it. If you're careful not to disturb the substrate and you don't have a super strong flow that's pointed at it, it shouldn't really fall into the soil.

As for your first question, you should plan out slopes in your tank along with the hardscape. It's a similar concept to terracing in landscaping. The soil will hold some slope, but it's helpful to create areas that are reinforced by hardscape. Any gaps in the barrier can be filled in with filter floss or small stones, so the soil doesn't make its way through overtime. Once it's set up, try your best not to disturb it. The plant roots themselves will also help stitch it in place to some degree. You can also use bags of crushed stone or even clay bricks to fill up space underneath it, and maintain the slope. I did something similar in my latest setup (attached photos). It's not an extreme slope, under a half the height of the tank, but with larger hardscape, and/or using more of a footprint, you could go higher. If you want other examples, there's a lot of information about this technique on this forum and other places online.

1027534

1027535


To get height you basically use rocks to create terraces so substrate doesn't all just slide down its level of repose. This requires a lot of rock and/or big rocks. You can add mesh bags of lava rock/pea gravel to the very bottom to get some initial height that is then covered up with substrate and rocks.

Because of the amount of rock needed I suggest buying rock either at a landscape supply company where its significantly cheaper, or get them for free from the wild. Otherwise you will spend hundreds of dollars in rocks for even a medium sized tank.

To make a walkway I would use small wooden sticks and tiny dabs of silicone to hold them together. This will stay ontop of substrate because it will be less dense then the substrate but will be a pain to source from a retailer unless you can pick them up in the wild. Good luck!
Sorry minorhero, I was getting all OCD when putting this reply together and didn't realize you had already posted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
533 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Beautiful advice, you guys. Thank you so much.
For a couple of reasons, I will be doing a 55 gallon. And yes, I do realize how skinny that itank is and how difficult it will be, so I do not have many delusions of grandeur (maybe just a few). But I think I am prepared to try my best to deal with it.
Anyway, I love all of your advice and appreciate it very much.
Thank you.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top