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So i just put some neon's in my planted tank with lots of co2 but i found i had to really lower the co2 down to get them to a point where they weren't gasping as the surface for air.

So my questions is to the people that have their co2 in the 70-80 ppm range how do you get to this level of co2 with your pressurized system. Do you just have tons of surface agitation or is there something else?
 

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To start with, it is highly unlikely that you will be measuring CO2 accurately enough to know that you have 70-80 ppm in the tank. So, I don't see much reason too shoot for that number. To be able to use the maximum amount of CO2, whatever the ppm is, you need to make sure the water is always saturated with oxygen, which lets the fish live comfortably with higher CO2. You can get a good start on that by keeping the entire water surface constantly rippled - no splashing, just big ripples. And, of course, you can only use high CO2 if you shut it off at night. High CO2 isn't going to be of much benefit unless it is high all over the tank, so very good in-tank water circulation is essential.
 

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It seems like a lot of CO2. So much so that I would think you have too much light if you have to run it that high or you don't have very good circulation. But if it's working for you and your fish don't mind then keep it up.

FWIW, in this years ADA catalog, there's a section on CO2 that includes a graph of CO2 levels in ADA tanks and CO2 levels peak around 14 ppm. I'm sure that's pretty dependent on their lighting levels and the plants they use though.
 

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I have a circulation pump 2 inches below the water line pointed toward the surface and another 4 inches above my substrate in a 150 gallon tank. As soon as my lights turn off I have a 28 inch bubble wand at the bottom of the back glass that stays on all night and shuts off just 45 minutes before the lights come on, I also start my CO2 injection 45 minutes before the lights come on to let it build up a little. The fish & plants are happy and the plants pearl everyday, if I ever have any algae problem I reduce my lighting to adjust.

According to my pH/kH my tank also has 70 to 80 ppm of CO2 and according to my drop checker I need more, but in 8 years I've never gassed a fish until 3 weeks ago by looking at that stupid drop checker (4 Rummynosed & 2 Green Neons) so if you see fish huddled and inactive on the bottom or going to the surface and this isn't normal, turn down the CO2, good luck.

For some reason Tetras are the aquariums warning system and it seems they die first in many of our aquarium mistakes, so for me they are a good indicator fish but I don't plan to kill any more!
 

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I beleive I am following the recommendations that I have read on the forum and still having problems with fish death (tetras).

KH was 8.6 and now down to 6.7 degrees with the addition of peat in my cannister filter after 1/2 week. I regulate ph to a minumum of 7 (start one hour before the lights come on and stop when the lights go off). During the time the lights are out and no Co2 my PH rises to 7.8. I am using a PH controller and have confirmed the PH with electrode calibration buffers and a test kit. Reasonably strong surface agitation 24x7. I also polish the water with a micron filter for a few hours a day (additional surface agitation). I turn on an air pump when the lights are out.

How quickly do you drop the PH when you turn on the controller? I have tried a very slow drop but the plants were not doing as well.
 

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It seems like a lot of CO2. So much so that I would think you have too much light if you have to run it that high or you don't have very good circulation. But if it's working for you and your fish don't mind then keep it up.

FWIW, in this years ADA catalog, there's a section on CO2 that includes a graph of CO2 levels in ADA tanks and CO2 levels peak around 14 ppm. I'm sure that's pretty dependent on their lighting levels and the plants they use though.
I'm pretty sure that was poor CO2 measurement and assuming the KH was actually all bicarb..........also, many doctor their parameters to suit the dogma, not the reality. Less is always perceived as "better" in many circles, aquarium books..........even if there's no real evidence to support this contention. Without some form of standard reference, such measures have no comparative measure to the true ppm.

Maybe it was 14ppm, maybe it was 35ppm, maybe it was taken AFTER the picture was taken and after they added lots of light for the photograph. All the CO2 is used up then. There are many many many unanswered questions there. I know what good plant growth looks like at various CO2 concentrations, few of ADA's tanks run at such low levels, that much I'm fairly confident of. You can rule you ferts and light fairly well and measure those easily. This leaves CO2 mostly.

I also curiously see very few fish in their tanks and of those, they are mostly highly CO2 tolerant.

And...the devil is in the details and methods.

I run a reference for CO2...........I think I might be the only person who has suggested and advocated this in the entire hobby, which is ......sad truthfully. Do not readily accept these things as truth/accurate.

I don't.

I really do not know what a good ppm levels is for a general target, some tanks will have 70ppm, others at 45ppm, a few maybe 30-35ppm.....
Different plant species also have different non limiting CO2 [aq] ppm's.

Light greatly influences things, current etc.

It's not a simple thing folks go add 30ppm, it is easy to measure and that's all their is to it, many many make this assumption(Not you, I'm just commenting on the ADA claims , not you personally, fear not!)

RO/DI water in with a KH reference (say 1-10 liters) with CO2 added/well mixed and pH meter can make a decent CO2 reference.

This way you KNOW the pH and KH are well corrected for any error.
Adjust the CO2 flow and mark down the changes in pH/CO2ppm, then measure the tank's KH and pH, see if there is any differences.

I simply use a slow metered adjustment to target the tank's plants, I do not stress the fish out as the upper bound, the plants should respond nicely without gassing your fish.
 

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I beleive I am following the recommendations that I have read on the forum and still having problems with fish death (tetras).

KH was 8.6 and now down to 6.7 degrees with the addition of peat in my cannister filter after 1/2 week. I regulate ph to a minumum of 7 (start one hour before the lights come on and stop when the lights go off). During the time the lights are out and no Co2 my PH rises to 7.8. I am using a PH controller and have confirmed the PH with electrode calibration buffers and a test kit. Reasonably strong surface agitation 24x7. I also polish the water with a micron filter for a few hours a day (additional surface agitation). I turn on an air pump when the lights are out.

How quickly do you drop the PH when you turn on the controller? I have tried a very slow drop but the plants were not doing as well.
My CO2 is about 50ppm or so in 45 minutes.
Starting at 3ppm. It slowly rises to about 70-80ppm at the end.
Drops to 3ppm in about 30 minutes.

O2 is about 7ppm, then shoots to about 10-11ppm at the end of the light cycle 7-10 hours in.

I have high current and a wet/dry filter.

Also:


Plenty of cardinals and many other fish, shrimp etc.
 
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