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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was at OSH the other day and decided to check out their gravels and sand. Well they had Horticulture Sand. It was great texture and coloring and would be perfect for my tank as far as looks. The problem is they only have 1 Quart bags. I dont want to buy to less and have to go back and I dont want to buy too many and waste money. My question is, how many of these 1 quart bags sould I get for my 10g? I want at least a 2" deep substrate. I did a search on Google, "Converting Pounds to Quarts", but nothing useful comes up.

Thanks,
James
 

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You can't convert from a Imperial Volume measurement to a Imperial Weight measurement without knowing the density of the material.

In fact you can't do it in the Metric system either.

A quart of mercury will weigh a LOT more than a quart of water.

Take the bag to the clerk and ask them if they can weigh it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You can't convert from a Imperial Volume measurement to a Imperial Weight measurement without knowing the density of the material.

In fact you can't do it in the Metric system either.

A quart of mercury will weigh a LOT more than a quart of water.

Take the bag to the clerk and ask them if they can weigh it.
Okay. Thanks for the quick response.
 

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10 gallon tank

About 9-10 quarts should cover you with a little to spare for tha Nano you've always wanted to start. hint hint... It never hurts to have just a little extra to go around...

Doug
 

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Okay. I am also going to ask just to make sure. How did you figure that out Doug? Just for future reference of course!
Simple math

10 gallon tank holds approximately 8 gallons after 2" of gravel is in place.
thats 2 gallons of water volume roughly for gravel to water displacement.

4 quarts equals 1 gallon and typically sand is a little denser than gravel so I added and extra 2 quarts to make it even off at 9-10.
 

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Wow hold on everyone. No need to guestimate or use rocket science, or even a conversion website.

Hasnt anyone here done elementary geometry? Your filling a volume. Your substance is already measured in volume. All you have to do is simple conversion to get an exact amount. Measure your tank length and width and multiply by the depth you want the substrate, and then just convert cubic inches to quarts. Its a snap when they actually measure stuff in volume, and not pounds.

A standard 10G I beleive is 10"x20". Thats usually the outside dimensions, if you want a precise calculation then measure the open area inside the tank instead.

For 2" bed, type this into google:

"convert 10 x 20 x 2 cu in to quarts"

or here, I did it for you just for reference: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=convert+10+x+20+x+2+cu+in+to+quarts&btnG=Google+Search

Remember this is an exact calculation. If you buy that exact quantity and everything was measured perfectly than you'll be good. But incase things werent measured perfectly you should get some extra (always a good idea anyhow).

Its realy simple, and you dont even need to use elementary math, just let google do all the math and convert the units. LxWxH = Volume (in cubic inches). convert cu in into quarts (for your case) or liters (for something like ADA Aqua Soil). The hard part is when its not labeled in volume but pounds. Then use the susbtrate calc at top of screen it will handle the more common options.

Google will do every conversion I have ever needed to do, so you dont even have to bookmark a converions site or download any utility. You dont even have to go to google if you have a google search thingy on your web browser searchbar. You can even type it in a few different ways and google figures out what your trying to do, for the most part. To see the great features and instructions on how do use googls calculator look at http://www.google.com/help/calculator.html
 

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Being unaware that google does math has probably kept me from becoming the president of the US huh!:hihi:

Seriously though... I haven't done Volume for nearly 30 years with all the calcs around...


The reason for volume to lbs is most gravel weighs a certain amount written on the package. This method I mentioned allow people who have the pounds of "ANY" gravel type substance to simply translate to volume and then they'll know how many bags, quarts, or other packaging they need to get to fill a certain amount of space.

Your method works also.

Doug
 

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~8 bags

I didn't use any math...
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
crazy: Right answer. But it's not the answer to the question that was asked. I used it as a teaching moment.
Actually I took what you said and what they said and it came out to the same answer. I went to my teacher and asked if I did the math right and I did. Alot of conversions for one day lol.
 
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