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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
About every second night I put on my high-powered glasses that lay on the shelf beside my 110 gallon tank and do a search. I start at one end of the tank and go through the water column paying attention to every little detail. I inspect the substrate, underneath the plants and on the plants themselves and any hardscape or equipment in the tank. This inspection is actually fascinating because of the many things I find; from different types of snails, my fish and shrimp and their well-being, to different aspects of the plants I'm growing. Sometimes I even find the odd critter like those mentioned on the "Bugs" thread in the Shrimp Forum.

But mostly I'm looking for algae. What made me think about posting this was that tonight during my inspection I discovered a small clump of hair algae growing under one of my Cripts and into my Glosso. Not too concerned, I grabbed my forceps and reached down into the tank and pulled up a small clump. What surprised me was the small clump was actually about six inches long and had grown around the stems of one of my Cripts. The base of the clump was attached to a piece of the substrate that came up with the hair algae. After further inspection, I couldn't find any more. But I will be paying special attention to this particular spot in the future.

I think it is very important in keeping an algae-free tank to do this regular inspection. I'm not sure how I missed this piece of hair algae in previous inspections, but it does go to show how fast algae can try and get a grip in your tank. Staying on top of it though, can, and does, keep it at bay. No matter what you do, algae will always be there. Making sure you know where or when it appears, I think, is very beneficial to an keeping algae-free environment (if there is such a thing).

Who else does this type of inspection on a regular basis? And I don't mean just a quick look through the tank. I'm talking about an inch-by-inch inspection from top to bottom.
 

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About every second night I put on my high-powered glasses that lay on the shelf beside my 110 gallon tank and do a search. I start at one end of the tank and go through the water column paying attention to every little detail. I inspect the substrate, underneath the plants and on the plants themselves and any hardscape or equipment in the tank. This inspection is actually fascinating because of the many things I find; from different types of snails, my fish and shrimp and their well-being, to different aspects of the plants I'm growing. Sometimes I even find the odd critter like those mentioned on the "Bugs" thread in the Shrimp Forum.

But mostly I'm looking for algae. What made me think about posting this was that tonight during my inspection I discovered a small clump of hair algae growing under one of my Cripts and into my Glosso. Not too concerned, I grabbed my forceps and reached down into the tank and pulled up a small clump. What surprised me was the small clump was actually about six inches long and had grown around the stems of one of my Cripts. The base of the clump was attached to a piece of the substrate that came up with the hair algae. After further inspection, I couldn't find any more. But I will be paying special attention to this particular spot in the future.

I think it is very important in keeping an algae-free tank to do this regular inspection. I'm not sure how I missed this piece of hair algae in previous inspections, but it does go to show how fast algae can try and get a grip in your tank. Staying on top of it though, can, and does, keep it at bay. No matter what you do, algae will always be there. Making sure you know where or when it appears, I think, is very beneficial to an keeping algae-free environment (if there is such a thing).

Who else does this type of inspection on a regular basis? And I don't mean just a quick look through the tank. I'm talking about an inch-by-inch inspection from top to bottom.
sounds like a little clado ....
I do my extensive search weekly with my water changes...Knock wood....since finding this forum and doing a lot of research before ever even putting water in my tank, I have been fortunate enough not to every have had a lot of algae problems. I never even had BBA before <uh ohhhh I jinxed myself>
That said, I don't mind a little for my otoes and shrimp and my SAE, but I end up having to throw in algae wafers and veggies a lot so they have enough to eat :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
To date I've had minimal algae in my tank as well. But the fat little stomachs on my Otto's tell me that it is definitely there and there is enough to feed them and keep them happy. I've read on this forum so many times "Help, algae is taking over my tank!" I can't help but think that a regular search helps to minimize this problem. That, and of course proper water parameters.
 

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I do. :proud:

But I don't have to spend so much time looking for algae. It's right there, staring back at me from every square inch of surface, glass or leaf! :mad:

On the serious note, I plead guilty to letting my guard down on this front and allowing hair algae (short hairs, carpet style) take hold in my 29g. I haven't run CO2 and ferts for the past 6 months. As soon as house renovation is more or less over, I'll setup 15 gal tank in the office and redo 29g shortly after.

Also, my 5 gal RCS tank is immaculate.
I also noticed that the adult ramshorn snail that I moved to 29 gal, cleaned up several square inches of glass in 2-3 days. But I'll probably need a dozen of those guys to see significant change.
 
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