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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have 3 heavily planted tanks all running off the same 5lb tank. I run about 2-3 bubbles per second and its only lasting me about two-three weeks. I read before I got into plants that a 5lb can could last me a year. What am I doing wrong, A leak. are my needle valves crap(leaky)?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
the problem is I have kittens. I wrapped almost every inch in wire loom bc when I came home from vacation my tank was empty. I found the hole they chewed in it so I replaced the whole length of it.
About how long should that tank last at 2-3 bps on three tanks.
 

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Gotta have a leak. I have been running a 20oz paintball bottle at 2-3bps on my 55g gallon for a few months now and it is still going.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thats 2-3bps on each tank. They are split with a brass T and a brass needle valve with compression fittings inline just before the bubble counter and silicon tubing.
I still haven't checked for leaks but I will tomorrow.
 

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Compression fittings and silicone tubing.

Not the best choice.

The silicone can leak up to 6% per foot. Couple that with compression fittings that are made for a tubing with a stronger wall and you have problems.
 

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Compression fittings with flexible hose can cause problems no matter what. It's easy to cut the tubing when tightening up the compression fitting.

Standard compression fittings are made for copper tubing. Not plastic.

Silicone is the worst choice you can make for CO2 lines. Vinyl is good but tends to break down due to UV (sunlight) exposure.
 

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Rex: What kinda of tubing is it that you sell? Is it Polyurethane?

My local fish store sells the teal colored tubing, I believe it to be silicone and they recommend it to everything for co2. What is the reason silicone is bad?

I also thought that vinyl was a bad choice aswell, its not very flexible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I know from experience that compression fittings work fine with plastic air line. I have 1/4" high pressure tubing in my tractor trailer all use compression fittings and at 120psi no leaks. I read that the co2 breaks down the plastic tubing thats why you need silicon. When I get my tank refilled tomorrow I will replace all the tubing with god old high pressure plastic tubing.
By the way retoid, People use silicon for the part that goes over the edge of the tank bc it is flexible.
 

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The tubing I sell is polyurethane.

See this post for the numbers on silicone.

Vinyl is a great choice. But it does break down.

fishymatty: Plastic is a big term. Sure some plastics work just fine with compression fittings. But silicone and vinyl don't. CO2 is a pretty inert gas. Most plastic tubings are CO2 resistant (meaning they don't break down in the presence of CO2).
 

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Excellent example, thank Rex.

The tubing I sell is polyurethane.

See this post for the numbers on silicone.

Vinyl is a great choice. But it does break down.

fishymatty: Plastic is a big term. Sure some plastics work just fine with compression fittings. But silicone and vinyl don't. CO2 is a pretty inert gas. Most plastic tubings are CO2 resistant (meaning they don't break down in the presence of CO2).
 

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Just an FYI- anytime you use compression fittings on any non-metallic or soft tubing you have to use an insert to avoid leaks, cuts and overcompressing the tubing.

Tommy
 
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