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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been going off the same single bottle & same batch for 1 1/2 months now with tiny micro bubbles 24 hours a day, anyone else have mixtures lasting this long?
 

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I've been going off the same single bottle & same batch for 1 1/2 months now with tiny micro bubbles 24 hours a day, anyone else have mixtures lasting this long?
Mine usually last about 5 weeks I haven't bothered setting them up recently so I'll have to start over but when I stay on top of it it's about 5-6 weeks
 

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Yep Ive read that the different brewer yeasts have a much longer life but how do you swap water without changing out the yeast?
 

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What's the recipe for champagne yeast, baking soda, sugar etc.

Give us the juicy details! I'm about to set one up this week-might as well do it right!
 

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Standard yeast only gives me good production for 3 weeks.
First week it is ramping up, getting good.
Second week is full production.
Third week is going downhill.
I can improve production by stirring it (Swirl the bottle around, do not get liquid on the tubing).
I usually run more than one bottle in each tank and overlap so the lower level of production out of one bottle is paired up with the higher level out of the other.

Sounds like champagne yeast is the way to go!
 

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Interesting! I haven't seen this "yeast cake" I wonder if this is related to using the champagne yeast. Typically when I swap mine out I just have what looks like cloudy water that smells like wine.
 

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Standard yeast only gives me good production for 3 weeks.
First week it is ramping up, getting good.
Second week is full production.
Third week is going downhill.
I can improve production by stirring it (Swirl the bottle around, do not get liquid on the tubing).
I usually run more than one bottle in each tank and overlap so the lower level of production out of one bottle is paired up with the higher level out of the other.

Sounds like champagne yeast is the way to go!

Sounds pretty exact to what I experience!
 

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Interesting! I haven't seen this "yeast cake" I wonder if this is related to using the champagne yeast. Typically when I swap mine out I just have what looks like cloudy water that smells like wine.
It's the thin layer of sediment that collects at the bottom of your bottle. Alternatively, you can leave about a quarter of liquid from your previous batch in the bottle, top it off with water, and then add sugar. The liquid from the previous batch will act as a "starter", as the suspended yeast will activate the fermentation process. I prefer this method as the yeast in suspension is "active", while the yeast in the sediment is "dormant", resulting in less time waiting for the fermentation process to restart.
 

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Champagne yeast is the key. It's able to withstand temperature fluctuation and alcohol content that standard baking yeast cannot.
+ 1

Champagne yeast is the way to go for these reasons.

Since you'll likely have to go to a homebrew store to get the yeast, you can pick up some of this stuff as well to see how long you can push the fermentation process. It contains basic nutrients that aren't present in a mixture of just water and sugar, and allows the yeast to reproduce more efficiently for longer periods of time. It's used in wine and cider making.

It might make for a fun experiment if you want to try and break somewhatshocked's 90 day timeline.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
glad to see others having long diy c02 times. I'm on bakers yeast using 4 cups sugar..I will also try champagne yeast next!
 
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