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I ask because i have a really old guy that from a quick web search seems way beyond his lifespan.

I just cleaned out my heavily planted 40 gallon tank and transfered all residents to new ADA 20. To my shock i found a small pleco i hadn't seen in two years and even more shocking a lone surviving amano shrimp. he's very healthy, and huge. he's bigger than my white cloud minnows. havn't seen him stop eating yet.

I just looked up in my microsoft money account and i originally purchased him in november of 2008. actually purchased three of them and have never bought any others from anyone else.

whats the longest anyone has heard of them living for?
 

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i have mine for a while now...maybe more than 6 month...i switch one between brackish and fresh...did fine

i don't think they die easy at all, and i never seen egg so i guess they all male or female
 

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Nerd Alert.
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I've my Amanos live in water with a layer of ice over it. Not good for them, I suppose, but they lived through it. Thats what I get for not having my heater running and an outdoor tank. Surprisingly though, when moving, it only got down to 40*f and that said amano (along with all my other fish :( ) died. Then again, it could have just been the stress of moving from one side of the country to the other.
 

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Just a data point in the conversation.

The last time I added Amano shrimp to my tank was in 2003, and those had been alive for at leaset a year if not more. Today, on the cusp of 2013 I count three shrimp easily spotted feeding on the biofilm.

My tank is freashwater only, and per my understanding NOT condusive to breeding the species.

So by my reconing, 10+ years can be achived with good conditions.
 

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Just a data point in the conversation.

The last time I added Amano shrimp to my tank was in 2003, and those had been alive for at leaset a year if not more. Today, on the cusp of 2013 I count three shrimp easily spotted feeding on the biofilm.

My tank is freashwater only, and per my understanding NOT condusive to breeding the species.

So by my reconing, 10+ years can be achived with good conditions.
Yes I have 3 which are about 11 years old. I originally had 4 but one of the females died about age 8, not sure why.
 

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I want to say that 10 years isn't possible for a shrimp.. It just isn't in the cards.

I'm not saying anybody is lying, but it would shock me if I found that for myself after attempting that experiment.

Y'all must be doing something right, congrats.
 

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I want to say that 10 years isn't possible for a shrimp.. It just isn't in the cards.

I'm not saying anybody is lying, but it would shock me if I found that for myself after attempting that experiment.

Y'all must be doing something right, congrats.
They've always been most popular among aquarists who focus on plants, and often live in warm soft water with a fluctuating pH due to CO2 injection. I don't think those are optimal conditions for them really, but if aquarists with those kinds of setups are the ones who tend to buy and write about them, the 'accepted' lifespan will reflect that... that's what I suspect, anyway.
 

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Invert Warrior
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They've always been most popular among aquarists who focus on plants, and often live in warm soft water with a fluctuating pH due to CO2 injection. I don't think those are optimal conditions for them really, but if aquarists with those kinds of setups are the ones who tend to buy and write about them, the 'accepted' lifespan will reflect that... that's what I suspect, anyway.
Not a bad point. However I know a lot of low tech people keep them too. I usually see posts about people not seeing them for a long time, tearing down a tank and finding them lol.
 

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i've had 2 in a low tech tank for .. nearly 4 years now. they went in the same day the water appeared to finish the cycle. one of them is quite big.. i think he is 2-2.5 inches. for scale, in the picture, that rock is between a cantaloupe and a football.



 
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