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My tank currently has 1 LED fixture and I'd like to add a 2nd. I currently have a BML Dutch XP but I don't want to spend $200+ on a second unit. I just need something to provide supplimental light to the back of the aquarium.

I'm considering Finnex Planted + Vrs the Ray2 daylight. My concern is the lack of red LED's on the planted+. How big of a role do the red's play on the growth? Also FINNEX said the Planted+ was designed for low light/low tech tanks? Do I lose anything by taking the greater output of the RAY2 that doesn't feature red LEDs?

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Tank: Fluval OSAKA 155 W 24in (L/R) x D 18in (F/B) x H 24in (T/B) - 42 Gallons
Fertilizer: Estimated Index Method
Co2: Pressurized and injected into reactor
Plants: My plan is for a mix of ground cover, reds, & greens. I want to add more color to the tank.
Current Lighting: (1) 24" Build My LED Dutch XP
 

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The red LEDs are a fairly new innovation when it comes to aquarium lighting. They are supposed to help in terms of plant growth, but the fact that many experienced aquarists have been able to growth beautiful plants in their tanks for years without this new innovation should tell you all you need to know about the necessity of red LEDs.

As for which fixture you should choose, it depends on what plants you have or want to grow towards the back of your tank.
 

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My tank currently has 1 LED fixture and I'd like to add a 2nd. I currently have a BML Dutch XP but I don't want to spend $200+ on a second unit. I just need something to provide supplimental light to the back of the aquarium.

ground cover, reds, & greens. I want to add more color to the tank.
Current Lighting: (1) 24" Build My LED Dutch XP
consider the current plus fw as a supplemental light.........
http://www.drsfostersmith.com/product/prod_display.cfm?pcatid=26107
 

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The red LEDs are a fairly new innovation when it comes to aquarium lighting. They are supposed to help in terms of plant growth, but the fact that many experienced aquarists have been able to growth beautiful plants in their tanks for years without this new innovation should tell you all you need to know about the necessity of red LEDs.

As for which fixture you should choose, it depends on what plants you have or want to grow towards the back of your tank.
Your logic is off. Plants need red light as much as they do blue.
The reason plants grow under lights that don't apparently emit red light is because they do emit red light. Even way back long before there was any talk of PAR the dutch (for their dutch style ) were using combination lighting to provide as full a spectrum from red to blue to achieve lush growth.
 

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I'm considering Finnex Planted + Vrs the Ray2 daylight. My concern is the lack of red LED's on the planted+. How big of a role do the red's play on the growth? Also FINNEX said the Planted+ was designed for low light/low tech tanks? Do I lose anything by taking the greater output of the RAY2 that doesn't feature red LEDs?
There is a plethora of scientific info on this topic on the web. It is important.
 

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Your logic is off. Plants need red light as much as they do blue.
The reason plants grow under lights that don't apparently emit red light is because they do emit red light. Even way back long before there was any talk of PAR the dutch (for their dutch style ) were using combination lighting to provide as full a spectrum from red to blue to achieve lush growth.
I think if you're able to get a light fixture with red LEDs, you should by all means do it. However, the OP was talking about the necessity of doing so. I don't see how anyone can consider red LEDs a necessity when aquarists have had tremendous success for years using fixtures that didn't include these lights. That's all I'm saying.
 

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I think if you're able to get a light fixture with red LEDs, you should by all means do it. However, the OP was talking about the necessity of doing so. I don't see how anyone can consider red LEDs a necessity when aquarists have had tremendous success for years using fixtures that didn't include these lights. That's all I'm saying.
I wasn't saying red leds are a must have. Just red light is a must have for good plant growth. Meaning growing as they would under natural light. But if he is using one type of led then the red portion of the needed spectrum may be deficient. See what I mean?
 

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I wasn't saying red leds are a must have. Just red light is a must have for good plant growth. Meaning growing as they would under natural light. But if he is using one type of led then the red portion of the needed spectrum may be deficient. See what I mean?
Gotcha.
 

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You are all way off. Chlorophyll A is most sensitive to red light. Any good fluorescent aquarium bulb peaks in the red spectrum. The reason LEDs do need them is because LEDs give out one specific nanometer of wavelength. A 7000k LED fixture only gives out one specific nanomemter of light where as a 7000k fluorescent bulb gives off an array of wavelengths. LEDs can grow plants pretty good, but in my experience they don't grow them as well as T5HOs or halides. They are too efficient for their own good. That is why higher end LEDs do have a tri-color or bi-color mix and this is why Finnex is joining the club and especially why they need to put high output red LEDs on the Ray II!! Which I am sure they are working on. I could go on and on about the science of lighting and why plants are red or the true reasons they turn red, but I won't. Take my word for it!
 

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There are a ton of "pink" / "grow" T8 and T5 bulbs on the market.

With LEDs,

Finnex is currently stuck at 7,000K with Ray 2 (one of the reasons why I sent it back when they just came out). There are multiple threads on TPT where people are using a second supplemental LED fixture with Ray 2.

BML essentially locks you into specific spectral ranges once you select your LED combinations. Just look at how many "pre-canned" versions they currently have. If you err on the red-heavy combination, the tank looks like s moment after shark attack.

Current USA took a different approach with their + model where some of the LEDs are RGB, allowing the end user to adjust the spectrum to their liking.

You can also use red LED strips, but what "red" do you want?

v3
 

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see what you started KRUPin?:red_mouth

so by so by virtue of my two tank shots (two months of growth) i must be doing something right with just 4 T8s, and RGB leds :thumbsup:

"You can also use red LED strips, but what "red" do you want?"

i like that last button on the left, the yellowish one on the bottom!
then the blue one next to it, at night.................................................lol
 

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You are all way off. Chlorophyll A is most sensitive to red light. Any good fluorescent aquarium bulb peaks in the red spectrum. The reason LEDs do need them is because LEDs give out one specific nanometer of wavelength. A 7000k LED fixture only gives out one specific nanomemter of light where as a 7000k fluorescent bulb gives off an array of wavelengths. LEDs can grow plants pretty good, but in my experience they don't grow them as well as T5HOs or halides. They are too efficient for their own good. That is why higher end LEDs do have a tri-color or bi-color mix and this is why Finnex is joining the club and especially why they need to put high output red LEDs on the Ray II!! Which I am sure they are working on. I could go on and on about the science of lighting and why plants are red or the true reasons they turn red, but I won't. Take my word for it!
A 7000k LED fixture only gives off one specific nm of light? And which is that? Because My finnex 7k light looks mostly white to me meaning it contains light from all parts of the visible spectrum. The kelvin values of an led fixture match up pretty well to t5's when we talk about scientific experimentation between the two.

A good read on the different aspects of lighting, and where I got the info is from here:
http://www.americanaquariumproducts.com/aquarium_lighting.html

The reason why companies put LED's of different colors in there is mostly because it makes things more visually appealing to the human eye. It can also boost plant growth, but that is best achieved using a 5-10k kelvin range and upping the intensity (PAR).
 

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Some terrestrial plant people say that red grows plants leggy and blue more compact, I got a www.reefbreeders.com led with 55 3w leds and chose a custom spectrum with an even mix of red and blue. Besides the growth factor, adding reds will help show off the red plants you have. Also a 7000k led does let out more than one nm of light. Even specific nm leds are letting out a small range of nm. http://www.1023world.net/diy/spectra/ there is a awesome calculator to see how all the different led spectrums add up. Select English in the bottom left. There is an image of the spectrum I chose as I felt it gave a good smooth full spectrum mix with a focus on reds and blues while also looking good to the eye.
http://api.ning.com/files/BlSO3TVin...jHJQ047TPRW0dNvu-zEb6lWagzixVs9imPTd/leds.png
 

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Will the 5050 RGB strip lights that they sell on fleabay and amazon provide the correct type of red light? I recently got a ray2 and then built another light using 5 strips of the RGB 5050 light. When both lights are on(the RGB light only has the red turned on) you can barely see the red because the ray2 is so bright. I'm just wondering if the red light is helping at all or if I'm just kidding myself
 

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Some terrestrial plant people say that red grows plants leggy and blue more compact
My own circumstantial evidence seems to show this in "some" aquatics..
 

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12 days growth under 20W 660nm red and asst whites and actinic blue
sporadic CO2 supplementation, slight dosing of phosphate and trace elements.:
 

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Some terrestrial plant people say that red grows plants leggy and blue more compact, I got a www.reefbreeders.com led with 55 3w leds and chose a custom spectrum with an even mix of red and blue. Besides the growth factor, adding reds will help show off the red plants you have. Also a 7000k led does let out more than one nm of light. Even specific nm leds are letting out a small range of nm. http://www.1023world.net/diy/spectra/ there is a awesome calculator to see how all the different led spectrums add up. Select English in the bottom left. There is an image of the spectrum I chose as I felt it gave a good smooth full spectrum mix with a focus on reds and blues while also looking good to the eye.
That's a very useful diy app.
 

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Short term growth is also a lot different than long term health. We did and experiment way back in junior high growing beans under different colors of light. The ones that grew the fastest were in darkness. They looked horrible, no color, stretched out leggy and just unhealthy looking. But they shot up really quickly for the couple of weeks that we had.
 

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Probably the worst light meter we can use is our eyes! Our eyes, on average, are not good for comparing the intensity of red vs. blue light. And, to complicate things even more, what we see as red actually is a mix of red and blue. "Red" light can have an amazing variety of spectrums - see the charts showing spectral transmittance of various gel filters on http://www.rosco.com/filters/roscolux.cfm

Plants grow well with many different spectrums of light, and I suspect that all of them have significant amounts of red wavelengths in them. No "white" LED that I have seen a spectrum for was totally lacking in red portions of the spectrum. I continue to believe that adding red LEDs, blue LEDs, green LEDs, etc. to our tank lighting is beneficial only for making the resulting aquascape look best to our eyes. (We could also discuss the fact that what I see as red isn't the same thing that you see as red - and some people see a very limited range of colors.)
 
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