The Planted Tank Forum banner

How do I write a letter notifying apartment that I'm moving out?

111843 Views 28 Replies 18 Participants Last post by  Aquatic Delight
My parents say I'm doing it wrong!! That all I have to say is I'm moving out and that's it. But I've been googling and the websites says otherwise! That I need to mention inspection and the deposit. I need advice or something! Halp me please!



To whom it may concern:


The purpose of this letter is to notify you that I will be vacating APT XXXX by January 31, 2011 because my lease agreement will come to an end and I will not be renewing it. All utilities such as water, gas, and electricity will be turned off by January 31, 2011. All keys will be returned in person to one of your leasing agents by January 31, 2011.


I also request to be present during the inspection of the apartment for damages. This inspection can be done in my presence on January 31, 2011 during a time that is convenient to the both of us.


Please recall I have made a $XXX deposit on July 01, 2009. I expect to have that deposit and all interests made on that deposit refunded to me in full. If you feel you are entitled to retain any portion of the deposit, you must provide me an itemized statement of all charges. If you attempt to retain any portion of my deposit without adequate reason, this letter is written notice of my intention to pursue claims to the entirety of the deposit.


Any letters, refunds, or notices on or after January 31, 2011 should be mailed to me at my new address:

XXXX XXXXXX XX
XXXXX, XX, XXXXX
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Drafting your Move Out Notice:

Some apartment complexes may have an official document that you have to fill out to let them know when you plan on moving out. If your apartment complex does not have a standard form, then you should provide a “notice to landlord” letter in writing. It should include these key items:

Landlord’s Name – Address the letter to your landlord or apartment complex.
Address – You should include the street address and the number of the apartment you will be vacating.
Your Name – Your name and all other occupants listed on the lease should be listed as tenants that intend to move out.
Move Out Date – You should include the exact date that you plan on moving out.
Current Date – Include the current date somewhere in the letter to show that notification was given within 30 to 60 days of move out.
Forwarding Address – If you already know where you’ll be living after you move, it might be a good idea to list your new address and when that address will be active.
Sign it – Sign your name at the bottom, and if possible, have your landlord sign that he has acknowledged the letter.
Copy it – Copy the letter and leave the original with your landlord. Keep the copy for when you move out at the end of your lease to have proof if an problems should arise.

Sample Letter:

Playing it safe and providing a written letter for your landlord stating that you will move out at the end of your lease is a good idea even if it is not required by your rental agreement. Not only does it protect your interests, but it is an act of courtesy to let your landlord know ahead of time.


Dear Willowood Hill Apartment Company,

This is to inform you on the 7th of October 2009 that John and Jane Smith intend to vacate apartment 100 located at 123 A Street in Grand Rapids, Michigan, at the end of the lease agreement on the 8th of December 2009. This provides at least 60 days written notice as required in our lease agreement. Please send our deposit and any other correspondence after the 8th of December 2009 to 456 B Street in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Thank you,
John Smith
Jane Smith
http://grand-rapids.movingtoanapart.../how-to-inform-your-landlord-youre-moving.htm
You need to consult the law in your state. That supersedes what mom said, or what you think it might be.
Most cities have a tenant assistance group. They can advise you on local requirements, probably over the phone or by pointing you at their web site.

This came up first thing in a Google search
http://www.fcgov.com/neighborhoodservices/pdf/lthandbook.pdf
Start at page 21.

Good luck.
I think you letter is very good and you shouldn't need to bother looking up the local law. Instead, I would take a quick look at your original lease and make sure there isn't anything specific in there that you need to address. For example, some leases specify that you have to terminate in a particular way, by a certain date, or mail it to a particular address, etc. so just give it a look.

Other than that, I think your letter is quite clear and you are wise to request to be present at the inspection. The landlord may not oblige this request, and if not just shoot a ton of photos of the apartment showing the condition when you leave.

You may consider softening the 3 paragraph a bit ('Please recall') as the language is rather strong. You could simple write something like, 'I will be leaving the apartment in good condition with no excessive wear or damage whatsoever. Please refund the security deposit in the amount of $xxx to the following address, including any interest as applicable". The language about the itemized charges, etc. aren't necessary - those details are governed by law/contract and writing it in there just makes your letter seem pushy.

Also send it certified mail, for sure. Then don't worry about it :)
See less See more
I'm guessing that Dave-H is a landlord or has never been involved in a tenant-landlord law suit.

Start at page 21 and make sure you follow the rules, dot the i's and cross the t's in the proper direction.
Many landlords, or leasing service companies, particularly the large ones use a tenant black list service. It's legal. Get on that and you won't be renting a decent apartment again anywhere in the country.
I am a landlord, was a long-time renter, and have been involved in tenant disputes, sure.

There is no reason that she would wind up on a tenant black list because her letter hadn't been perfected legally, so I'm not sure where your comment is going. Contract law, and specifically landlord/tenant law is very well established and settled in court and unless she's leaving behind a material liability for the landlord (i.e. damage, unpaid rent) her letter should be fine.

Like it or not, there are just as many tenants who are abusive towards landlords as their are tenants who are abusive towards tenants. With some exceptions, the law tends to lean in favor of tenants and as long as Eden is leaving the place in good condition and has upheld the terms of the lease there should be no problem.

Dotted i's and crossed t's don't mean much in contract law - it's a misconception that technicalities will freely nullify or otherwise alter a contract.
Holy cow, when we moved out of our duplex we didn't write a letter or anything. We took an inspection tour with our land lady, she gave us our deposit and wished us well in life. Nothing was ever brought up, and we left it in top condition.

Of course, our landlady was very nice and only owned a handful of properties. A letter suddenly seems like good idea, but I would not stress over it. It's not like you are breaking your lease or anything.
Okay, well I don't have the lease with me, but my mom is bring ing it up with her tomorrow. I do remember that I do have to give a WRITTEN notice 30 days ahead of moving out.

My lease agreement is ending in the end of Jan and I will not renew it, so this letter is not to break the lease early.

So I should send it by certified mail, not hand it in person?? I'm afraid it might not get to their hands by December 31, 2010. I'm moving out on Jan 31, so they need my letter by Dec 31.

Well I will rephrase the deposit thing, I just copied and paste that from one of the many websites I visited.

It just that the APT itself is in good condition... but I messed up the microwave!! The paint inside the microwave bubbled up and when I was cleaning the microwave the bubbled up paint peeled off as I wiped the microwave door, so now there is this large ugly rusty metal part exposed to the microwave door inside... :(

I'm sorry I'm a noob, but I will look into both advices...
Okay, well I don't have the lease with me, but my mom is bring ing it up with her tomorrow. I do remember that I do have to give a WRITTEN notice 30 days ahead of moving out.

My lease agreement is ending in the end of Jan and I will not renew it, so this letter is not to break the lease early.

So I should send it by certified mail, not hand it in person?? I'm afraid it might not get to their hands by December 31, 2010. I'm moving out on Jan 31, so they need my letter by Dec 31.
If the building manager lives in the building you should just hand it in. Unless there is some history of conflict between you and management I don't see what the big deal.


If your expecting to get the whole deposit back you might need to be realistic about that. They usually charge you something just for cleaning the apartment. Some people try to save money by cleaning the apartment as well as they can before they leave but some places will deduct a cleaning fee no matter how well you scrub it. Which is why I never even try to clean anything and just look at that as money already gone. But maybe I'm just lazy.
If the building manager lives in the building you should just hand it in. Unless there is some history of conflict between you and management I don't see what the big deal.


If your expecting to get the whole deposit back you might need to be realistic about that. They usually charge you something just for cleaning the apartment. Some people try to save money by cleaning the apartment as well as they can before they leave but some places will deduct a cleaning fee no matter how well you scrub it. Which is why I never even try to clean anything and just look at that as money already gone. But maybe I'm just lazy.
Well she does live in one of the buildings, I'm not sure which one exactly. But can I give it one leasing agents, or the sub-manager? (I'm having a brain fart, there is a manager under the main manager and I can't remember what it's called).

Yea I'm thinking some of the deposit will probably be kept, but I think my mom wants to clean up as much as possible after the movers move the stuff out. Like she wants to rent a Rug Doctor to clean the carpets and all that other shenanigans.

I HAVE noticed that the people around me seems to always get their carpet replaced!! I remember in the lease that if the carpet has to be replaced we have to pay for it, and I'm not so sure my deposit of $150 is gonna cover that, plus a new microwave...
I didn't read the whole thread, but you just walk into the apartment office and request a 'move out' form. Most larger complexes have this option, which has all of the information you need, including the maintenance checklist which shows you the things they'll be checking for (to take your deposit money, hah)

I've also lived in a smaller apartment complex, and in that complex I just asked the manager and he said to simply write "i'm moving out on this date" and mail it (so that it's post marked 20 days before the move-out date).

It's best to check your states' landlord-tenant act.


Also, in Washington state, the law says the landlord must replace the carpet if it is more than two years old at the cost of the landlord, might be worth looking into. Also always steam clean the carpets, it's just a nice thing to do.
This is all getting overblown, especially for a $150 deposit. Just check the lease to see if there are any special terms, submit the letter accordingly (certified mail if you want to be extra sure, but not necessary) and see how it goes.
Heh.

I walked in, told them I'm leaving, and they can keep the damn deposit of a whopping $1.

Then proceeded to pay my final bill in increments of $10, requesting a receipt for each money order. Shouldn't be so rude to your renters. ;)
I personally think they are nice, but my mom thinks they trying to do something sneaky. But we are going to talk to them today to see how they want it..
The law is pretty much written to protect property owners. I usually consider my deposit a tip, and have never been let down and only once surprised. By that, I mean to say that I don't think people get deposits back too often. Make two copies of whatever you are giving them and ask whoever is in the office to sign and date one of them. It's best to have a copy and for the office manager to know that you do.

I always take a day, after everything is out, to spackle and clean really well, because I don't want to be a jerk. Just be as polite as you can be and accept that some companies are good and some bad, some people are good and some bad. After that, the ball is in their court though and then can pretty much do what they want. A land lord that is not an investment company or a complete whole is a really valuable thing.
In PA you need to send your move-out letter certified mail and you can request to be present for the inspection but otherwise the landlord isn't required to have you present during the walk through inspection. My last deposit before I bought my house was $1200 so it was kind of a bigger deal. Also in PA the landlord is required to pay back the interest accrued on a deposit while in escrow during the period of rental. My landlord was committing insurance fraud by having his car insurance issued to our rental address while he actually lived in Jersey where car insurance is way more expensive. I simply made him aware I knew his insurance situation and threatened to ruin it for him. He was a jerk landlord though and on a few occasions we battled. For your $150 you're in a much different situation. Just know the local laws and play accordingly...
Okay well I wrote something, and guess what??? It turns out my lease doesn't end till the end of Feb 28. But I'm still moving out early and giving them a free $775!! WOW!
The law is pretty much written to protect property owners.
That is such an incorrect, overgeneral, hyperbolic statement that it is hard to address. Most importantly, it's just not true. Tenants see things from a different perspective that is frequently centered around getting back their deposit. Landlords take much, much, much more risk as the potential liability and material damage that a tenant can cause far exceeds the typical deposit.

Further, landlord associations are constantly confronted with the fact that the law is so frequently on the side of tenants that many smaller disputes aren't worth pursuing even if they exceed the value of the security deposit. If a tenant abides by their lease terms and doesn't cause any unreasonable wear/damage, they should be just fine. So many tenants are antagonistic and hateful towards landlords that they say things like 'the law is always on the landlord side' and do things like paying them $10 dollars at a time.

The reality is that landlords take much bigger risk and are less protected by then tenants law from financial loss, therefore they get bigger rewards as profit most of the time. Tenants are both good and bad, as are landlords. Most landlords are trying to do business and have little interest in having issues with tenants, they just want the rent and no problems.
See less See more
Okay well I wrote something, and guess what??? It turns out my lease doesn't end till the end of Feb 28. But I'm still moving out early and giving them a free $775!! WOW!
You aren't giving them a free $775. You rented the place until the 28th, so you simply rented a place that you don't need. They aren't getting anything 'extra'.

In most states, if they re-rent an apartment that you vacated early you can collect the rent that you paid. The law usually states that landlords can't 'double collect' - so if you move out and your lease persists, they have an empty apartment and you have to pay them because it's not their fault that the place is empty. However, if they are able to find a renter then they can't double collect rent and they have to return any rent you paid for the place that covers the same time period when the new renter came in. That is a tenant protection law that I am pretty sure exists in CO. Keep in eye on it.
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top