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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been having problems with my first planted tank, I've experienced an ammonia spike due to improper fertilization, now I've realized I have no kh(one drop turns it yellow), and fish aren't doing so hot, I need the ph up higher, around 7, and the kh around 6. So how can I do this in a safe way without stressing my fish more?

replies will be greatly appreciated.
 

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You have several things going on with this post.

First of all fertilization does not cause an ammonia spike.

Second is that most all fish (with a few exceptions) will be fine in zero dKH water. I keep a tank full of Rainbows in pure RO water and most of the rest of the world uses very soft or no dKH water for planted tanks.

In all likelyhood your fish are not doing well due to an ammonia spike. But again, that would not be caused by fertilization.
 

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Are you talking about this tank where you used Osmocote? If so, you don't mention which type of Osmocote. Regardless, you wouldn't likely see a spike out of nowhere after a few weeks. That stuff starts releasing pretty much the instant it hits water. So it would have already been in your water column. Having merely an inch or two of sand or four or five inches wouldn't make much of a difference. The substrate is wet, so it's gonna get into the water column. And if that's all you were placing in a 40-gallon tank, your filtration would have been able to adapt pretty quickly. I'd be more concerned in a tiny tank but I've used Osmocote in small shrimp tanks for years.

As @Greggz suggests, chasing pH and kH are the last things you want to be doing right now. Constantly messing with parameters will do more harm than good. Stability is what you should strive for.

What's your feeding schedule in the tank? Have you done any filter maintenance? Attempted to alter parameters? Anything else like that?

Note: Moved this to the Water Parameters section. Please start posting in proper topical areas of the forum so you'll get better advice and so moderators don't have to move every post. Not everyone with experience or expertise is going to check all sections of the forum.
 

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In addition to primarily looking at the likely causes of an ammonia spike, we should probably make sure that the OP's pH hasn't actually fallen to deadly levels, unlikely as it may seem.

@shrimp? fish? CRABS?!?: What is your pH and how do you measure it?
 
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In addition to primarily looking at the likely causes of an ammonia spike, we should probably make sure that the OP's pH hasn't actually fallen to deadly levels, unlikely as it may seem.

@shrimp? fish? CRABS?!?: What is your pH and how do you measure it?
Yep agreed. But that would be a truly neglected tank maintenance problem.

My point was that the premise is likely wrong. Adding ferts to zero dKH water does not create an ammonia spike. But really very difficult to have any idea of what is going on with so little information.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes I was referring to root tabs, just the osmocomote capsules encapsulated with clear gel I did do a filter cleaning recently, found a bunch of detritus in it, now that I am realizing it a few days later, the main cause of the ammonia spike and ph crash was me being neglectful of the all the rotting organic matter(floating plant and leaves) they got stuck in the filter, and reduce flow, reducing oxygenation and new bacteria being in able to grow. Leading to the ammonia spike, and then the nutrients acidfied my water, and then, due to the lack of kH, the ph crashed, leading to my situation, I have to come to this conclusion as I cleaned and removed all rotting organic matter, and the filter is back to normal, and the fish are also fine.
 
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