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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

Just painted the replacment tank for my build and the black background really accents how bad the under rim areas look. Unfortunately there is a the assembly sticker and the tank is drilled so can't be reversed. I drilled the side I did since there is a noticeable scratch that I didn't want in the viewing pane but now I find the sticker super annoying. There is also a bunch or dust (likely glass from drilling) under the rim which I thought I had all cleaned out but I guess not.

Short of taking off the rim is there anyway to cover or hide this? Normally I wouldn't care but it is very visible when seated on the couch which will be the primary viewing location.


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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Maybe I'm missing something. Why not remove the sticker and finish cleaning out the dust that you missed?
I should have clarified more, my bad. The sticker and dust are under the black plastic top rim that's siliconed to the tank. So to remove the sticker or clean that part of the glass I would have to cut the silicone and pull off the rim.

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Ok, now that is an issue. I couldn't tell by the pics. The first thing that comes to mind is painting the top of the inside but that could be problematic. Maybe a strip of thin black plastic you could attach to the inside. Any plans to use a spray bar that might help hide it?
 

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I can't figure out what I'm seeing from the photos, but one thing to note is that things look different when an aquarium is full of water i.e. the surface of the water and the side glass when viewed from the front basically become mirrors and aren't see-through.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok, now that is an issue. I couldn't tell by the pics. The first thing that comes to mind is painting the top of the inside but that could be problematic. Maybe a strip of thin black plastic you could attach to the inside. Any plans to use a spray bar that might help hide it?
Spray seems promising, I actually am working on determing what style of sump return the tank will use. The orginal tank had a drilled return with a loc line Y but the threaded bulkhead kept leaking at the street elbow. When I went to disassemble and retape the return plumbing for the third time the union jammed. I twisted to hard and the tank broke at the return bulkhead. So this new tank will not be drilled for the return and it will be run over the top instead, either a Spray bar or the loc line or a mix of the two.

I thought about painting but assume the oil based rustoleum protective enamel I used on the back would be a bad choice for in tank use. I do have some krylon fusion Spray paint that I was planning to use on the sump drains but spraying might be very tricky to do neatly.


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I can't figure out what I'm seeing from the photos, but one thing to note is that things look different when an aquarium is full of water i.e. the surface of the water and the side glass when viewed from the front basically become mirrors and aren't see-through.
Sorry about that, the glare from light was making it tough to photograph. Here a few more from the top down and front on.

The sticker in the picture is the assembly sticker that sits between the glass and top rim on the top right back corner of the tank. The dust is also between the glass and top rim running most of the length of the tank. The most dust is located above the drain hole but should be hidden by the overflow which sits almost flush to the underside of the rim.


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If you truly want to cover it up, Krylon Fusion is the way to go. You'll need to tape off (really well) the area you want to cover and then tape on a tube or small box of some sort to prevent the paint from going everywhere. And be ready to wipe up any drips that get through. But it'll work well - especially for such a small spot.

I've had to do this a few times to hide unsightly scratches and have never had an issue later on. Have had one of the tanks in use for probably a decade and the paint's as good as new.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If you truly want to cover it up, Krylon Fusion is the way to go. You'll need to tape off (really well) the area you want to cover and then tape on a tube or small box of some sort to prevent the paint from going everywhere. And be ready to wipe up any drips that get through. But it'll work well - especially for such a small spot.

I've had to do this a few times to hide unsightly scratches and have never had an issue later on. Have had one of the tanks in use for probably a decade and the paint's as good as new.
This seems like the best bet from an asethitics stand point. I think I'll try filling the tank to see how it looks full first before doing this since it would be pretty involved

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This seems like the best bet from an asethitics stand point. I think I'll try filling the tank to see how it looks full first before doing this since it would be pretty involved

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Filling it first is a good idea.

But as complicated as I made it sound, just remember that it's honestly pretty quick and painless. Maybe 5 minutes of total work. Making sure your masking tape remains stuck down is all you'll have to do.

And if you mess up? A razor blade will make quick work of any error.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Filling it first is a good idea.

But as complicated as I made it sound, just remember that it's honestly pretty quick and painless. Maybe 5 minutes of total work. Making sure your masking tape remains stuck down is all you'll have to do.

And if you mess up? A razor blade will make quick work of any error.
With the tank, full none of it is noticeable except for the corner of the sticker. I might still paint over the sticker since I already have spray paint to make the PVC plumbing look nicer.

For the spray paint, I've always seen Krylon fusion mentioned as the go too. I purchased some Krylon Colormaxx not knowing it was different than the fusion and am wondering if it is okay? The can says it includes paint and primer and is for metal, wood, plastic, and more.

For the spray paint, I've always seen Krylon fusion mentioned as the go too. I purchased some Krylon Colormaxx not knowing it was different than the fusion and am wondering if it is okay? The can says it includes paint and primer and is for metal, wood, plastic, and more.
Decided not to risk it and returned it and shaped it out for krylon fusion.


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Just now seeing this but I've never used Colormaxx in a tank. Since Fusion is known to be reliable, it was definitely worth the effort to exchange it.

Was looking through an old tank journal of mine last night and realized I've had Fusion in some of my tanks for much longer than I mentioned above. Have been using it in one of my acidic shrimp tanks since probably 2005 or 2006. I used it to paint DIY shrimp caves/tubes made out of PVC pipe. Still looks good as new. If it can stand up to that water, it can probably stand up to anything.
 
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