The Planted Tank Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have 12 dwarf neon rainbows, 8 dwarf chain loaches, and 12 Amano shrimp in a well-established ~60-gallon planted tank. (The tank and filter have been going for ~6 years. The fish are a little new: about 2 weeks ago, I traded my former fish for these and 4 pearl gouramis that are on order.)

About 48 hours ago, I did my first water change with a new hose setup, refilling the tank for the first time--slowly--with water straight from my garden hose while simultaneously dosing with Prime. The rainbows have been hiding in a dark corner ever since, while the loaches and shrimp are acting normally. The rainbows came out to eat today, but went right back to their corner, after 2 weeks of acting normally.

I live in a place with a mild climate, and the temperature of the tank goes down just ~2-4 degrees when I change ~50% of it's water either the old way (buckets) or the new way (a slow garden hose). All water parameters look fine: Ammonia and nitrites=0/undetectable, nitrate=~5ppm, phosphate=~0.5ppm, GH=23°/411ppm, KH=10°/179ppm, pH=~7.5 (those hardness and pH values are normal for Santa Barbara, CA, where I live).

Did I do something to severely stress my fish? They didn't hide at all after bucket-based water changes, but they're still hiding now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
375 Posts
I guess the beauty (but also potential downside) of using a hose to refill the tank is how quickly the new water can be added. Not sure how long your _slow garden hose_ took to top-up the water, but maybe go even slower next time? But maybe your fish are just new, young and still settling in to their new home. How similar is your tank water to the new water being added?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Did I do something to severely stress my fish? They didn't hide at all after bucket-based water changes, but they're still hiding now.
The fact that they didn't hide at all after bucket water changes is interesting to me; there really shouldn't be any difference between the two methods. Maybe do a bucket water change to see if they come back out again?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,661 Posts
Did you remember to dechlorinate? Did you add enough? The local water company may have added more to system than usual? they will do that periodically.
Were there a lot of micro-bubbles when adding water which can lead to stress or Gas bubble disease depending upon amount of micro-bubbles exposed to.

Look at fish carefully: gills, body of fish, eyes. These sites will give you clues to issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the comments!

The new water was added pretty slowly--maybe 30 minutes for 25-30 gallons?--more slowly than the 5-gallon buckets I used to tip into the tank. No bubbles, small excess of dechlorinator, water parameters of old vs new the same. It's just weird that the fish were comfortable all over the tank for two weeks, and now this. It's now a little over 72 hours later, and the rainbows are still hiding (loaches and shrimp have been fine all along).

I forgot to mention that I did a water change in my 33-gallon tank the same day with the same method, and the fish there are all fine, totally unfazed.

The only thing I can think of, and I left it off to keep my original post shorter, is that right after the water change, I thought the phosphates were too high (I think ~1ppm) and I thought I might have accidentally overdosed my fertilizer. Nitrates were normal, but I did another water change that night, probably 4 hours after the first, as soon as I noticed the new behavior. Still, even if I did accidentally add too much fert, the water has been fine for 72 hours and the loaches are all fine. And I may not have overdosed...maybe the phosphates were just kind of high or I misread the API color chart?

It still seems weird.

Bump: ...but I did not yet look at the fish's gills, eyes, etc. I'll do that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It's now 5 days later. Rainbows still hiding, loaches still fine. The rainbows' eyes, mouths, fins, and breathing all seem normal, but their background color now looks darker. I'm starting to wonder if they're sick, and it just hadn't yet shown up in the LFS. Maybe the stress of the water change, regardless of method, was the thing that sent them over the edge.

I've been so busy at work--I'm a teacher, up past midnight every night scrambling to convert my classes to online--that I haven't had time for another water change. I'll do one tomorrow and see what happens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Problem resolved, but I don't know how. The rainbows gradually came out of hiding over the course of about a week after my last post, without me making any significant changes. I'd suspect some transient component in my town's water supply, except all my other fish seemed unaffected. The pearl gouramis arrived, and everyone's happy now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,411 Posts
some review is needed, so these are just things for you to think over how things were done.
The new hose is one item to question as new things can have small hidden problems involved. Any chance that the new hose was used first on this tank and there might have been some type of pollutant involved which went into the first tank but was pretty well cleared before other tanks?
how did the water enter the tank? Was it in a way that the sub was not stirred very much as that can do weird things at times?
The chlorine question is often mentioned but if we look at things a bit closer, I find it is not very often the real problem due to two things. The amount of chlorine does vary at times and the supplier does change the amount frequently as testing shows needed. But if you are in an area where things like water are certified and safe, the amount allowed to come to your faucet is carefully controlled, even though the amount added does vary constantly with large suppliers who have full time staff to monitor the water.
The amount of chlorine or chloramine does depend on the day to day changes in the water source but the amount is tested at lots of different points throughout the system to make sure the levels stay within the set limits.
We live in an era where fake info and complaints are just a part of life but when we want to know what is in our water and what levels are allowed, looking for the required Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) for your supplier will give you vast details on what levels of chlorine are allowed and what levels were found in testing over the past year.
AT last check, chlorine is allowed but only to a maximum of 10 PPM and looking at Prime we find that the normal dose is designed to treat to the maximum allowed! Overdosing can be a hazard as it may cut the O2 content and be problem in itself if too much is added but it does take and extreme like fully double if I remember correctly.
What all these low level thinkers that tell you chlorine is way too high fail to figure into their story is how sick chlorine poisoning makes people! If both family, fish, and neighbors are all getting sick and dying, then be sure to report it to the EPA! Otherwise consider other problems to be more likely.
I think the dog ate their homework once too often!
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top