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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This is my son's 29 gallon. We bought a new filter that was internal because no room underneath and the HOB water trickling was noisy for him. So I really enjoy this filter and is doing great in my (his) tank. It is just so bulky and I am not sure how to hide it any ideas?
 

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I use 1/16th stainless steel 316 tig wire.
Bend a hook to fit top and follow contour of filter.
Then tie moss to it with thread, spot of gel crazy glue to anchor thread.
Looks rough till moss grows a bit.
You can unhook it pull it out and clean and trim if needed too.
I need to make 1 more, I'll take a pic in a day or two.
 

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You can unhook it pull it out and clean and trim if needed too.
I need to make 1 more, I'll take a pic in a day or two.
And that right there is a huge benefit to this idea. +1 for this idea!
 

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I use 1/16th stainless steel 316 tig wire.
Bend a hook to fit top and follow contour of filter.
Then tie moss to it with thread, spot of gel crazy glue to anchor thread.
Looks rough till moss grows a bit.
You can unhook it pull it out and clean and trim if needed too.
I need to make 1 more, I'll take a pic in a day or two.

This is a great idea for hiding something inside the tank. but in the OP tank, the existing plants have mostly hidden the filter, and some additional growth should hide it. It may be that the op need do nothing at all to get the filter hidden. Given a little time, it's possible to create quite a jungle in there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The plants in front of filter are being blown around from the flow. I have adjusted the spray bar numerous times but plants just aren't hiding it. Just wanted to hear some ideas others had.
 

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I just looked up 'Tig Wire' and found this scary stuff:
Compliance and Restrictions


  • View the Safety Data Sheet (SDS) for this item.
  • This product contains a chemical that is regulated under California Proposition 65.
    Warning: This product contains a chemical known to the State of California to cause cancer.
    Warning: This product contains a chemical known to the State of California to cause birth defects or other reproductive harm.
 

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Must be the MSDS for the electrode used in tig welding.
Many varieties and some are even radioactive.

316 stainless rod is just unadulterated wire product.
It has no flux or coating.
 

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Many TIG wires are alloy steel, containing nickel, chromium which are carcinogenic. I am not sure I would trust them in water. Check out the 316 rods further down on this page: TIG Rods (GTAW) | Welding Consumables | Products & Solutions | ESAB

Maybe I am wrong, but I think there may be better alternatives to TIG wire. The chance that it can leach these metals into the water is too great for me.
 

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OK TIGROD 316L

Specifications

Alloy Type: Austenitic (with approx. 10 % ferrite) 19% Cr - 12% Ni - 3% Mo - Low C
Typical Tensile Properties
Elongation Tensile Strength Yield Strength
As welded
32 % 87 ksi 68 ksi

View full specs

Bare corrosion resisting chromium-nickel-molybdenium welding rods for welding of austenitic stainless alloys of 18% Cr - 8% Ni and 18% Cr - 10% Ni - 3% Mo-types.~OK Tigrod 316L has a good general corrosion resistance, particularly against corrosion in acid and chlorinated environments. The alloy has a low carbon content which makes it particularly recommended where there is a risk of intergraular corrosion. The alloy is widely used in the chemical and food processing industries as well as in shipbuilding and various types of architectural structures.

These were the specs for the 316SS.
Any liquid products you consume has passed through 316SS pipe welded with this rod in a sanitary application.
Drink soda, milk, beer, whiskey? Eat canned good, soups, etc?
These products flow through this piping all day long.
If we can eat from it can your fish swim in it? I would think so.
Many buy 316SS mesh and attach plants, what is the difference?


Every pipe joint in this pic is welded in such manner.
304SS would also be suitable in fresh water tanks.


Yes chromium is a carcinogenic. They perform tests at my work while we weld.
Wearing a gas detection device during work tasks.
No dangerous levels were found while tig welding.
It can't rub off the pipe, but becomes vaporous while welding, breathing providing entry point to the body.
 

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OK TIGROD 316L

Specifications

Alloy Type: Austenitic (with approx. 10 % ferrite) 19% Cr - 12% Ni - 3% Mo - Low C
Typical Tensile Properties
Elongation Tensile Strength Yield Strength
As welded
32 % 87 ksi 68 ksi

View full specs

Bare corrosion resisting chromium-nickel-molybdenium welding rods for welding of austenitic stainless alloys of 18% Cr - 8% Ni and 18% Cr - 10% Ni - 3% Mo-types.~OK Tigrod 316L has a good general corrosion resistance, particularly against corrosion in acid and chlorinated environments. The alloy has a low carbon content which makes it particularly recommended where there is a risk of intergraular corrosion. The alloy is widely used in the chemical and food processing industries as well as in shipbuilding and various types of architectural structures.

These were the specs for the 316SS.
Any liquid products you consume has passed through 316SS pipe welded with this rod in a sanitary application.
Drink soda, milk, beer, whiskey? Eat canned good, soups, etc?
These products flow through this piping all day long.
If we can eat from it can your fish swim in it? I would think so.
Many buy 316SS mesh and attach plants, what is the difference?


Every pipe joint in this pic is welded in such manner.
304SS would also be suitable in fresh water tanks.


Yes chromium is a carcinogenic. They perform tests at my work while we weld.
Wearing a gas detection device during work tasks.
No dangerous levels were found while tig welding.
It can't rub off the pipe, but becomes vaporous while welding, breathing providing entry point to the body.
Thanks for the follow up. It is good to know. I have never looked into it before, and it struck me when I read the MSDS on TIG wire. When they say it is 'resistant' to corrosion by water, it sends up red flags for me. Water or other acidic liquids flowing through pipes probably does degrade the metals. In fact, the main issue with chloramines is how they degrade metals and release lead from the pipes. So I assume chromium and nickle, etc., are also leached into our drinking water and bottling factories. So even though TIG wire may be used in welding pipes for drinking water, etc., I am not sure I'm willing to take the chance in my tanks. I think it could accumulate and cause problems down the road.

I was thinking about taking a welding class, but geeze, the cost was well over 1000 dollars for a few weeks of instruction. Understandably supplies are a big part of the cost.
 

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I'd use mini pelia, I think that stuff carpets a surface even faster than moss.

Lol at that price you could fly here and do a week course, its R2000 so about $135 .
O lord our currency sucks. We might as well start using money cowries again.

 

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I'd use mini pelia, I think that stuff carpets a surface even faster than moss.

Lol at that price you could fly here and do a week course, its R2000 so about $135 .
O lord our currency sucks. We might as well start using money cowries again.

That excess of available shells could cause the shell value to collapse, and we'd be right back where we are again....Searching for gold.
 
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