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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have these two plants that I bought in a bunch. They really have no root so I am not really sure if how to grow them. One of them is already rotting ( stem is rotted), and the other one is losing leaves and looks wilted. I am sure I am doing something wrong, any suggestions?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Lights on the tank? How high above the tank? How many hours are they on?

How long since the plants started to lose leaves?

What size tank?


Tank is a 40B.
Has two lights: one Flora sun 17W (5000K), the other Aqueon 17W
They are on about 11-12 hours/day

Plants are new, maybe a week, just noticed a couple of stems floating yesterday with the end of the stem totally rotten.
I have a mix of flourite and regular gravel
 

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Looks like a lack of light, spread them out a bit and see if that helps.
You mean pull the stems apart and plant each one separately?

Looks like a lack of light, spread them out a bit and see if that helps.
Do you happen to know what type of plants these are? I am not really sure what they are.
 

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Yes pull them apart and plant them with a bit of space around them. The lighting you have is fairly low light which is fine, but if your plants are densely planted they won't get enough light to grow and will lose their lower leaves.

The photos are too far away and blurry for me to tell exactly but you can look through the plant finder database and see if you can ID them yourself. Or you can take a bigger/close up photo and post that and I can probably help you out.
http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/forumapc/plantfinder/all.php

The second one looks like Rotala rotundifolia, but the first one is difficult to tell without better pictures.
 

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Yes pull them apart and plant them with a bit of space around them. The lighting you have is fairly low light which is fine, but if your plants are densely planted they won't get enough light to grow and will lose their lower leaves.

The photos are too far away and blurry for me to tell exactly but you can look through the plant finder database and see if you can ID them yourself. Or you can take a bigger/close up photo and post that and I can probably help you out.
http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/forumapc/plantfinder/all.php

The second one looks like Rotala rotundifolia, but the first one is difficult to tell without better pictures.

Cool website. Thank you!
I think its this one: MYRIOPHYLLUM TUBERCULATUM

Yes pull them apart and plant them with a bit of space around them. The lighting you have is fairly low light which is fine, but if your plants are densely planted they won't get enough light to grow and will lose their lower leaves.

The photos are too far away and blurry for me to tell exactly but you can look through the plant finder database and see if you can ID them yourself. Or you can take a bigger/close up photo and post that and I can probably help you out.
http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/forumapc/plantfinder/all.php

The second one looks like Rotala rotundifolia, but the first one is difficult to tell without better pictures.
What type of bulb do you recommend if T8 is not intense enough?
 

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Well, it seems like you are going the low tech route to keeping planted tanks - lower light bulbs, low fertilizer load, slow and steady plant growth. There are higher tech methods you could use if you wanted like adding high powered lights (T5 High Outputs, or metal halides, or powerful LEDs) and adding CO2 gas, fertilizers, etc. It depends on your level of interest and willingness to do maintenance.

Adding more light, ferts and CO2 will help plants grow extremely quickly, densely, and colorfully but it increases the chances that you'll get algae and requires more time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well, it seems like you are going the low tech route to keeping planted tanks - lower light bulbs, low fertilizer load, slow and steady plant growth. There are higher tech methods you could use if you wanted like adding high powered lights (T5 High Outputs, or metal halides, or powerful LEDs) and adding CO2 gas, fertilizers, etc. It depends on your level of interest and willingness to do maintenance.

Adding more light, ferts and CO2 will help plants grow extremely quickly, densely, and colorfully but it increases the chances that you'll get algae and requires more time.

Does it matter what temperature lighting I use? typically I go between 5000-6500K, but they tend to have less power at these temps.
 

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Most 5-6500K bulbs will work for growing plants. To get more intensity you'd really need to change the type of fixture you have to a more intense light bulb. Probably not necessary for your tank unless you want to get into high tech. Or high tech soil tanks.
 
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