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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As I was running the hose to my 300G for its first seam-test, I realized
"There is no way this should be on carpeting"
I have a 300G, 220G, 180G, 150G, and 90G going in a room in my basement (on a concrete pad on bedrock). It is currently carpeted. I need to replace the flooring. My questions would be:
1) Carbonized Strand Bamboo or Tile?

and

2) Plumbing under the floor or around the top of the room?

With question #1 it's simply a matter of practicality and long-term durability, costs aside. With #2, though I know running the plumbing under the floor is what the "pros" do, but I have nightmares about a gourami lodged 30" into a pipe under poured concrete.

This is rudimentary, though to-scale:

Some pertinent info - My "out" (of the house) is a pump-up I installed for a slop sink in the fish room which drains fish water only (no gray/waste) to 2 500G reservoirs I pump to sprinklers for irrigation. I could conceivably drain through the wall direct to the reservoirs with gravity from the big tanks. The filtration room will have a series of 120G silos with my media and CO2 injection from a 50# tank.

I appreciate all assistance. I really want to get this floor finished so I can fill these bad-boys!
 

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What about just a self leveling vinyl 2 part pour flooring, water proof and easy to clean. I use to use this in grocery store floors in Florida and you pour and it levels itself. I'd be worried about bamboo flooring cupping due from moisture and or humidity. With bamboo flooring you are only suppose to use a damp mop or cloth to clean, so spills may be no good for this long term.
 

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I would worry about water getting under tiles.

What about painting it? There are all kinds of rubber and epoxy floor paints available. Multiple colors and styles. You can even buy kits at Home Depot and Lowe's for garages and basements.
 

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What about just a self leveling vinyl 2 part pour flooring, water proof and easy to clean. I use to use this in grocery store floors in Florida and you pour and it levels itself. I'd be worried about bamboo flooring cupping due from moisture and or humidity. With bamboo flooring you are only suppose to use a damp mop or cloth to clean, so spills may be no good for this long term.
How does it look...I want the display room to be as nice as possible (my longer-term plan includes an atrium in the middle of the room). One reason I thought tile might be good, though I hadn't considered moisture getting under it (does that happen with sealed floors? how do they do kitchens?)

I would worry about water getting under tiles.

What about painting it? There are all kinds of rubber and epoxy floor paints available. Multiple colors and styles. You can even buy kits at Home Depot and Lowe's for garages and basements.
To my point below I would think whatever method they use for kitchen tiling would suffice for the aquariums no?
 

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When you say tile, it can leave some room for different items. Hard tile like stone works very well for me on concrete. Flexible tile would not suit me. I find the hard tile to be very durable and easy to install as well as clean. Once grouted and sealed it is nearly forever. This would be my first choice.
There may be different questions in your area due to temperatures. It works well here as it tends to cool the floors to moderate the heat. Maybe not so good for a cold area to have it wicking cold into the room??
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
When you say tile, it can leave some room for different items. Hard tile like stone works very well for me on concrete. Flexible tile would not suit me. I find the hard tile to be very durable and easy to install as well as clean. Once grouted and sealed it is nearly forever. This would be my first choice.
There may be different questions in your area due to temperatures. It works well here as it tends to cool the floors to moderate the heat. Maybe not so good for a cold area to have it wicking cold into the room??
Sorry to clarify I meant hard tile, probably granite.
It is relatively cold where I am (Westchester NY), and the room is below-grade, so that is definitely a consideration. Perhaps I should look at some sort of radiant heating system?
 

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How does it look...I want the display room to be as nice as possible (my longer-term plan includes an atrium in the middle of the room). One reason I thought tile might be good, though I hadn't considered moisture getting under it (does that happen with sealed floors? how do they do kitchens?)
You can get it in various colors, we use to do white and then do flake in it. They were publix grocery stores. But I'm sure u can tint it to liking, it seals the floor and if u had a central drain in the floor u could squiggy the floors dry. That's my plan when I buy a house. Store works great. Wish I could remember the name. Try googling self leveling vinyl flooring
 

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Have you thought of polishing your existing slab? It's fairly inexpensive and on older slabs can add quite a bit of character to the room.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Have you thought of polishing your existing slab? It's fairly inexpensive and on older slabs can add quite a bit of character to the room.
That is a fabulous idea sir, and I think that is the way to go! Though, now you have me considering pouring concrete slabs for the tank stands as well...
We had polished floors in one of our old art galleries. It looked awesome, and was very easy to clean even with drunkard artists spilling wine everywhere. I will document the process and post pics at www.tomstanks.com, Thank you very much!
 

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The disadvantage to a concrete floor is that it is cold in the winter months. I do like the polished concrete idea though.

Since you are starting fresh, you might want to consider the radiant flooring idea. It probably won't be a cheap option and I've heard that it can be added to an existing concrete floor as an overlay using electricity as the power source as this method shouldn't alter the existing floor height too much.

It should also make working in the fish room with bare feet much more pleasurable.
 
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