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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
well I need some help with my diy co2. I have setup my system with a 2l bottle applejuice. I have a second gatorade bottle that is a safety just incase my co2 bottle decides to overflow and then i have it going into a water bottle for a bubble counter. holes were sealed with epoxy.

i used 1.5 cups brown sugar, 1/4 tsp beer yeast lol it actually looks like dark apple juice

I preped the yeast as per package saying to let it sit in water no hotter than 88 degrees. then added it to the mix.

Its been 2 days and i have not seen any co2 being formed. I was reading and most people said with the brown sugar i dont have to add any baking soda, is that true? I have some just incase though.
 

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Let me get that right... so you have one bottle with sugar/yeast solution, then one empty bottle, then another bottle as a bubble counter, then it goes into the tank?

That would be a lot of bottles, and even though you might have epoxied the airlines, there is a large possibility of leaks.

One, epoxy and flexible vinyl or silicone are not a good combo, it might work, but the epoxy gets hard, and the airlines still flex, so...

Second, one or more of the three bottles might not be closed completely. There is a thin line between not tight enough and oops, overtightened. Apple Juice bottles don't need to withstand a lot of pressure, so that's a likely candidate for leaks.

I'd lose the second bottle. Make sure the solution bottle can't tip over. Baking soda is not necessary. Some have gotten better results with soft water, I get a lot of foaming (hard water). You can try it, but it's not what prevents your setup from working.

Also, shake the bottle with the solution, and look for tiny bubbles (champagne-like). If you don't see any, there is a possibility of your yeast not being yeast. Get some cheap dry yeast from the grocery store.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks, when i set this all up i soaked all caps and hose connections with soap water. then from the main line blew air and held the air and at the same time looked for bubbling. i didnt see any.

The apple juice bottle doesnt have its "cap". I used a rubber stopper with a hole predrilled smaller than the tube (that thing was tight to put in) and it is compacted into the top of the apple juice container. the rubber itself was about half an 1/4 inch bigger total diameter than the opening of the container ensuring a air tight seal.

with the other 2 bottles i used the epoxy on the inside of the cap as well so that there wont be any leak issues. Also with the other 2 bottles that i put the tubing in, i drilled a hole smaller than the outer diameter of the co2 hose and then pulled the hose in it making a tight seal, i just put silicone over it just incase.

and to make sure that when the tubing flexes it doesnt flex at the joints where it contacts the cap i put "stress bend points" which was just a ziptie holding the 2 (input and output) together so that if it has to flex it will flex from above the ziptie and not below it.

I do have very soft water, ill try to shake things up and see what happens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks, i guess you were right about the yeast. for the hell of it i opened the bottle and poured like half a tsp in. it started working immediatly and producting co2.

but i did find a leak in my bubble counter cap, found that out when the water from the tank back tracked into the bottle flooding it and going into my second overflow bottle haha.

the overflow bottle had no leaks though.

right now i got a bell diffuser, drilled a hole into a bottle cap and shoved the tube in it...its ghetto but it seems to work for now lol
 

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yea that was very temporary lol.

im thinking of them ceramic glass diffusers. I was going to make a reactor but got a little lazy.
I think with diy co2 it would be better to go with a reactor of some sort. I would shy away from any ceramic glass diffusers if you plan on using them with diy. The main reason is that they require very high pressure. So unless you are willing to use a 4 bottle diy setup, it will be very hard to get it to work correctly. I have tried with a 2 1gallon bottles and it didnt work well with the glass diffuser. It took about 2 days to see a small amount of mist and the bottles including the bubble counter bottle were under very high pressure.

Now i bumped up the number of bottles to 4 and i have a consisted source of co2 but I seems that the glass diffuser just puts it all to waste. A good amount of co2 dont get dissolve and are just release into the air. So I just got a powerhead and diffuse co2 through there. I still use the glass but I just put it right under the powerhead's intake
 

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im thinking of them ceramic glass diffusers. I was going to make a reactor but got a little lazy.
I think with diy co2 it would be better to go with a reactor of some sort. I would shy away from any ceramic glass diffusers if you plan on using them with diy.
I agree with tacoman; with a DIY setup, you may or may not be able to generate the required pressure to get a glass/ceramic disc diffuser to work properly.

[snip]
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
thanks for the advice there both of you. I will definitly do the reactor then.

do you guys think its ok to seal up seams with black hot glue instead of epoxy? hot glue is slightly soft so that it will flex a little.

i wish i can find check valves that fit the darn 3/16 tubing (ID)i have. or at least find a 3/16 to 1/4 adapter....I seen check valves like 6mm ones on ebay but i have to wait till it ships from thailand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
cool, for now the diffuser, i just shoved it under the bubble counter ladder.

got hecka brown stringie algae in it from not running co2 for 2 days. so got to clean that out tomorrow and start my ferts.

I was looking at the bubble sizes and they are huge, should i go with a smaller diameter hose like 1/4 instead of 3/16?
 

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I'm not sure what you mean. Did you shove the tubing of your DIY CO2 output under your bubble counter ladder? Or do you have a separate diffuser?

If you have a separate diffuser (i.e. on a powerhead), then it may be best to position it above your bubble ladder so that it can capture any stray bubbles and further diffuse the CO2.

If your diffuser is the glass/ceramic ones as mentioned above, then you probably won't need the bubble ladder.
 

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cool, for now the diffuser, i just shoved it under the bubble counter ladder.

got hecka brown stringie algae in it from not running co2 for 2 days. so got to clean that out tomorrow and start my ferts.

I was looking at the bubble sizes and they are huge, should i go with a smaller diameter hose like 1/4 instead of 3/16?
3/16 is smaller than 1/4. did you mean 3/8? if so, then yea a small tube or any attachments that has a small outlet would help. This for feeding the powerhead, right?
 

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The rate of flow in a reactor does not matter except when it is so great that it will blow the CO2 bubbles out without giving them a chance to dissolve. Actually the reactor is a bell diffuser with the difference that the flow agitates and breaks up the CO2 head thereby increasing the surface area and also carries away the CO2 rich water which allows a faster dissolution/diffusion of the gas into the water.

Go ahead and build without worrying.
 
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