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Mine is two stage regulator connected to a 3 kg co2 cylinder. I set it up a month back and it was on 2 bps. I was away this wknd the solenoid is on a timer. But when I tried turning it on today.. the psi on the smaller gauge reads 0 while the larger one which was between 500 and 1000 is now over 1500. Tried closing the regulator needle valve and cylinder valve. Then opened the regulator and then the cylinder valve. But no change in any of the values. There s no co2 coming out either. Solenoid s a little warm which means power s reaching it. Now is my tank empty in which case shudnt the larger gauge have a drop in psi rather than a increase.. or my smaller regulator is broken.. please can someone help me out before I dismantle it and try refilling it. Thanks.. here s a pic

The pic..
 

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Let me start simple and walk through like we know nothing? Hope not to insult you but it helps to not miss some small thing?
The main tank pressure is the higher reading gauge. It will not start moving down until all of the liquid CO2 is gone and you are using the part which has tuned to gas. The reading may go up at times but just due to the tank getting warmer. If you pick a cold tank up at the refill and take it home to warmer, the pressure can go up a bit and may go up/down slightly as the room temp changes.
The smaller reading is the gas pressure AFTER the reg and what should be passing to the solenoid. The solenoid is a "gate" that should let gas through when it is powered. One way to check when you think the solenoid is passing is to loosen the fitting coming out of the solenoid. CO2 is not dangerous to breathe and such so this is safe to do. Just open the fitting and plug/unplug the solenoid to see if you hear or fell gas at this fitting.
You may have something in the line plugging it or the solenoid may be stuck closed.
When you say it is hot, that can mean it has overheated and is stuck. Sometimes a stuck one can be made to work for a short time if we let it cool and rap it to jar the movement loose. It does not work for long in most cases. Once they begin to stick they often have to be replaced.
hope it helps!!
Use care to back the working pressure knob off each time before opening the tank valve to avoid possible damage to the low pressure gauge. The reg may take a few seconds to actually start regulating and some can let the high pressure through to hit the low pressure gauge and bend things.
 

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Pressure response curves at fill levels and temp (sorry degrees F)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the replies. Today morning I unscrewed the cylinder from the regulator. On opening nothing came out of the cylinder. Guessing there was a leak and it just ran out. But the gauge on the regulator still reads 1500 psi even after removal. So think that one s out for some reason. Taking the cylinder for a refill and getting the regulator checked with my lfs. The thing is.. I used water in my bubble counter and it soon got evaporated. When I changed the water I think I must not have screwed it properly. Two questions.. is there any way that we can ensure there is no co2 leak.. second I have heard we can use oil instead of water in the bubble counter.. wat kinda oil can we use.
 

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Dripping soapy water can be a start but then it has some things missing. I find it works better to use more of a "lather" of soap. A use a small amount of water and add quite a lot of soap and then "whip" the mix to make something like shaving cream or whipped cream.
For the most total testing, we need to keep the soap in place long enough for small leaks to show by watching for bubbles which increase in size. This may still miss large leaks which can blow the mix off but those leaks are often found by listening or feeling the cold gas.
If the meter reads pressure still, it is likely to be defective.
Correct procedure to help avoid damage to the low pressure meter? This is not likely to be what caused the high pressure meter problem but might save future damage.
Before connecting the reg to the tank, turn the pressure adjustment as low as possible. Usually this is turning counterclockwise until it begins to feel loose. Don't unscrew totally out but you will often feel when it is not compressing the spring.
Then put it on the tank or open the tank valve. At this point, you should see the high pressure gauge move up to somewhere around 800-1000PSI, depending on temperature of the gas and tank. At this point there should be no reading on the low so you can begin to turn that adjustment in (clockwise?) until you get the pressure you normally operate on.
Doing this can let the reg do it's job and get stable before letting gas go to the low pressure gauge.
 
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