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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Recently decided to try the edsal shelving that is sold by lowes . Since many members used it and gave good rating on it i decided to use it. After putting everything together and filled up my 40 b . I saw a video on youtube where one guy put the edsal shelving and has his rails facing up "the lip is up" , and mines the oppisite where the lip is on the bottom (refer to pic) . And to add on , my edsal didnt cone with instructions so i decided to try putting it all together myself. My question is . Does it matter which way the shelving rails goes or is there a paticular way its made where the lip has to be on top/or bottom? Hope this aint confusing.

My pic is flipped to the side . So flip it towards the right and thats how my shelf is . Filled up 40 b and everything is set . Now im just afraid it might not hold up in the future if i have the rails set wrong.
 

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Lip should be near the top. The lip is flat on one edge only. With it installed as shown, the fiber board shelves are not as well supported. Also, your tanks will be recessed / masked by the braces when installed as shown.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Lip should be near the top. The lip is flat on one edge only. With it installed as shown, the fiber board shelves are not as well supported. Also, your tanks will be recessed / masked by the braces when installed as shown.

Other than it not being balanced / or recessed? What do you think about the integrity of the rails ? Do you think one side is stronger than the other?

As for the fiber board , i replaced it with some expensive plywood which is almost about 3/4 thick so i dont think the boards would be affected.
 

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Let me name a couple legs on the brace and then discuss? Name the wider side "A" and the thinner side "B"?
When "A" is down, the brace will only bow down if the metal of "A" is torn in two. Very hard to do that.

When "A" is up, the center can bow down if the metal of "A" begins to bend or fold. Very much easier to do.

If however, you bolted the 3/4 plywood solidly to the brace in several spots, I would then call it safe to use. The combo of bolts and wood would make it very difficult for the brace to bow down in the center. Overall it would not be my first choice for a stand but then we do all make calculated guesses at times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Let me name a couple legs on the brace and then discuss? Name the wider side "A" and the thinner side "B"?
When "A" is down, the brace will only bow down if the metal of "A" is torn in two. Very hard to do that.

When "A" is up, the center can bow down if the metal of "A" begins to bend or fold. Very much easier to do.

If however, you bolted the 3/4 plywood solidly to the brace in several spots, I would then call it safe to use. The combo of bolts and wood would make it very difficult for the brace to bow down in the center. Overall it would not be my first choice for a stand but then we do all make calculated guesses at times.
Thank you for the response , so is my leg the part where you said " A is up or A is down?" Thank you again .
 

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Check me on this as pictures can fool at times!
But as I see the pictures, the top is at the left side? That looks like the wider part of the brace and that would be "A" on the upper side. That would look like the weaker way for it to be placed.
The question can become how metal can bend or fold easier that it will be torn in two. With the loose edge of "A" positioned down, that loose edge can't fold or bend as it tries to move. To move down the edge will have to be torn apart. With that loose edge pointed up (if I'm seeing the picture right?) the edge is much easier to move in or out to let it bend.
I would judge it stronger with the brace turned over so the wider flat is down rather than up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Check me on this as pictures can fool at times!
But as I see the pictures, the top is at the left side? That looks like the wider part of the brace and that would be "A" on the upper side. That would look like the weaker way for it to be placed.
The question can become how metal can bend or fold easier that it will be torn in two. With the loose edge of "A" positioned down, that loose edge can't fold or bend as it tries to move. To move down the edge will have to be torn apart. With that loose edge pointed up (if I'm seeing the picture right?) the edge is much easier to move in or out to let it bend.
I would judge it stronger with the brace turned over so the wider flat is down rather than up.
Ill try to take better pics when i get back home from work. The inside has a curvature that isnt seen in those two pics .
 

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According to online documentation, either is a plausible option without the strength of the shelf being compromised.

IME, only setting the lip higher works because my 40B tanks will not sit squarely in between the rails.
 

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Looking at the OP's photos again, now on a PC instead of a phone. The lip appears to be flat on both edges. Mine isn't like that. The lip on my stand is probably 70 - 80 degrees on 1 edge, 90 on the other. All of the brackets with my stand were formed this way. So, I think the OP is ok with the brackets turned either way, aside from the issue of the tank being recessed below the bracket.
 

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I see what PlantedRich is saying. The current install is upside-down.
The lip piece looks like it has a little flange, currently in the down position, and a big flange, currently in the up position. This larger flange will be stronger in the down position. I would flip the rails.

I have a somewhat different product, but a similar concern, and I placed all the shelf supports with the wider flange down. The smaller flange is enough to keep the wood in place without bolts.

I also replaced all the particle board with exterior rated plywood, primed and painted with exterior paint. I had used a few of the particle board shelves, and they gave up within just a few months.
 

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Speaking as a structural engineer (my day job): the rail will be a bit stronger with the flange (lip) at the top. I'm not familiar with this exact unit, so I couldn't say how much, and it may very well be strong enough either way, but it will be stronger with the flange at the top. The most likely mode of failure for this narrow beam is probably bucking of the compression side (top) of the rail, the flange will help to add a little additional strength to resist that buckling.

-Justin
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
I thank everyone for their time to respond to thus thread. Great advices. Sorry for taking such a long time to post the pics (was tired from work last night) . Here are the examples , i took better quality pics without it being on the shelf to let you see how the rails are.

First is the shelf i bought , couldnt find the model number but ill input the model once i find it online. **model MR3618BWG
Second this is how my rails are on the tank

Third this is the opposite of what i have for my rails.

*i dont know why my pics always rotates when i post with my phone . But rotate it towards the right .

Thanks everyone
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
I see what PlantedRich is saying. The current install is upside-down.
The lip piece looks like it has a little flange, currently in the down position, and a big flange, currently in the up position. This larger flange will be stronger in the down position. I would flip the rails.

I have a somewhat different product, but a similar concern, and I placed all the shelf supports with the wider flange down. The smaller flange is enough to keep the wood in place without bolts.

I also replaced all the particle board with exterior rated plywood, primed and painted with exterior paint. I had used a few of the particle board shelves, and they gave up within just a few months.
If a flange is what i think it is (the "lip") , then both sides are the same width. What im concern about is the little curve section of what brings the "lip" out . Thats how my rails are (second pic) . Afraid that little curve would give out? Not sure which side is stronger. I did the same with the particle boards. . I replaced them with 3/4 plywood primed and painted also .

Bump:

Bump:
Speaking as a structural engineer (my day job): the rail will be a bit stronger with the flange (lip) at the top. I'm not familiar with this exact unit, so I couldn't say how much, and it may very well be strong enough either way, but it will be stronger with the flange at the top. The most likely mode of failure for this narrow beam is probably bucking of the compression side (top) of the rail, the flange will help to add a little additional strength to resist that buckling.

-Justin
I did added extra pieces leftover to resist buckling as you can see in the photo. But i provided a better closeup pic of the rails . 2nd pic above this show how mines are. Let me know what you think thanks. I wish there was a manual given when i bought mines. I cant even find the manual online .

Excuse the mess ..
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Just called customer service provided model number and asked about the stability and strength. Not too sure if i could trust the customer service reliability, all they said was it is fine either way and "in my opinion". To me it wasnt too much of a solid answer..
 

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I did added extra pieces leftover to resist buckling as you can see in the photo. But i provided a better closeup pic of the rails . 2nd pic above this show how mines are. Let me know what you think thanks. I wish there was a manual given when i bought mines. I cant even find the manual online.
By 'flange,' I am referring to the part that actually sticks out 90 degrees to the main part of the beam, that the plywood sits on.


I still think it will be stronger with the flange at the top, but it is likely not a huge difference and is probably strong enough either way, especially if you put plywood down to spread the load out to the entire perimeter.


-Justin
 

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Sorry about my answer. I thought I was seeing a simple angle piece rather than what you really have. I think I would still recommend turning it over with the part you are holding in the last picture down.
 
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