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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Folks

I recently set up a new Fluval Roma 125. Its been running for a month now and all has been well until recently. Its a double island type set up with both islands raised and the substrate is fluorite black. with aquarium sand along the front and in between the islands. I have red moor roots with Anubias nana and Bonsai, java fern and Java moss attached. These are all growing well.
Planted in the fluorite I have Bacopa Caroliniana, Staurogyne Repens, Echinodorus and straight Vallis. I have been using Seachem flourish once a week. The Bacopa and Repens wee growing fine, with some Bacopa reaching the surface.
My problem is the Bacopa leaves now seem to be melting and the Repens is slowly starting to turn yellow.
The lighting is standard for the tank two 15 watt t8 tubes. One aqua glow, one power glow. I was told to only have the lights on for 6 hours for the first month as it is a new set up. Should I step it up to 8 or 10? I am not using co2.
What could be causing the demise of the Bacopa and Repens?:help:
 

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http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/showthread.php?t=107303
You do not have complete ferts. It may no be the complete answer either, but won't
hurt to remove that as the cause by starting them.
Do not just run out and buy the first thing that comes to your mind. After reading the link, ask more questions on here as there are many options.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Help

Thanks for replying guys, I'll try to get some pics up soon. The leaves don't have holes in them there going yellow from the tips of the leaves inwards, the very top few leaves are ok it seems to start about 3 leaves down.

The plan was a low maintenance set up so I don't really want to go down the co2 route.
 

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Fresh Fish Freak
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Which "Flourish" are you using? I know Seachem's labelling on the bottles is really misleading, but "Flourish" is actually the name they use for their entire line of fertilizers. There's Flourish Excel, Flourish Comprehensive, Iron, Nitrogen, Potassium, Phosphorus, etc etc etc. You actually need to buy quite a few different "Flourish" bottles in order to provide a balanced fert regimen for plants.
 

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Plant Whisperer
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lauraleellbp is right, "Flourish" is quite misleading. Many people generalize by writing "Flourish" but it is pretty non-descriptive.

Most of us use dry fertilizers which provide several years (sometimes decades) worth of fertilizing for our tanks instead of spending the same money on liquid fertilizers that last a few weeks.

Many people buy from this site (and other sites):
http://www.aquariumfertilizer.com/index.asp?Option1=cats&Edit=2&EditU=1&Regit=2

KNO3, KH2PO4, and CSM+B are the bare minimum you want to buy though it is nice to have K2SO4, and DTPA chelated iron.
 

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Fresh Fish Freak
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Lovely aquascape!

Looks like you need to put together a better fertilization regimen.

Stem plants grow the most quickly, and therefore their demand for nutrients is much higher than the rest of the plants you have in there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Help

Thanks, its not a good picture, I'll put a better one up later.

What should I be feeding them, is there anything that comes close to being the complete fertilizer?

Will any ferts damage my fish?
8 cherry barbs
2 German blue rams
1 Gardneri killifish
4 Corydoras Julii
2 otocinclus

The Flourish I have been using simply says Flourish "comprehensive supplement for the planted aquarium".
 

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Fresh Fish Freak
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Flourish Comprehensive's label unfortunately is quite misleading. Comprehensive is mostly just micro and trace nutrients- actually, those nutrients that plants need in LEAST amounts, compared to carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium.

If you want to stick with Seachem's line of ferts, you will need to pick up quite a few more bottles. Their "Enhancer pack" is the macro nutrients that plants need in the greatest amounts. Seachem has a recommended dosing chart on their website.

No, ferts will not hurt your fish.
 

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Most people/w some experience use dry ferts or mix the dry ferts into a solution and dose that. Actually there is a step by step thread up here right now about what is called EI ferts. Simply put, you add more of each kind than necessary for your sized tank and dilute it each week/w a water change so it don't build up on you.
http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/showthread.php?t=621810
Look through this and get back with the next question as I know it will only cause more of them.
This is a list of some of the places you can get these ferts from. But learn a little before buying. Just remember you have this list on your question.
http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/showthread.php?t=506393&highlight=
http://greenleafaquariums.com/aquarium-fertilizer.html
http://aquariumfertilizer.com/index.asp?Option1=cats&Edit=2&EditU=1&Regit=2
Two of them have "kits" which supply you/w the bottles to make a liquid solution of the dry ferts with to simplify things.
You still need to pick a type to use and find out how to tell how much you need for your tank size.
 

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Couldn't the OP get away with root tabs for now?

I have a couple types of bacopa for a year now. And I haven't started dosing ferts, but will be soon. I did however start out using root tabs. Until I ran out of root tabs, all of them were growing like a weed.

CO2 is not a requirement for any of those plants that I am aware of. That is not to say it wouldn't help, but you also need a balance of nutrients as well. You will do fine without CO2, just slower growth.

Anyone else for adding root tabs? I think it is cheaper than buying a bunch of Floursh products. Then start looking up information on EI dosing for low tech. It really is not as hard as it sounds. I know I was overwhelmed with the idea when I first started.
 

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Fresh Fish Freak
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Depends on how well those stems have rooted to be able to take advantage of root tabs... and from the looks of them, I think water column dosing is much more likely to be effective at this point.

If it were swords or crypts that were struggling, then yes, root tabs would be a good option.
 

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Plant Whisperer
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Depends on how well those stems have rooted to be able to take advantage of root tabs... and from the looks of them, I think water column dosing is much more likely to be effective at this point
I agree, water column dosing is a better option than root tabs. Water column dosing will ensure the stem, leaves and probably the roots as well will get access to nutrients. Many aquatic plants absorb more nutrients from their stem and leaf tissue compared to roots.

Also, a carbon deficiency prevents the plant from growing any new leaves at all. Carbon is an immobile nutrient within plants, once it has been incorporated into leaf tissue like cell membranes, etc it cannot be removed and transported to new leaves. Without carbon dioxide the plant cannot make new leaves at all because it cannot make cell membranes and other vital structures. If your plants are forming new leaves then it is not a true carbon deficiency it is another deficiency.
 
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