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Discussion Starter #1
I could use some advice on getting my new CO2 regulator put together.

Pictured left to right:
- PTFE threadseal tape
- CGA320 to paintball adapter
- Camozzi needle valve
- white nylon washer
- power plug
- CO2 regulator w/ solenoid (CGA320)

My main question is: Should I use the PTFE threadseal tape on the threads before connecting my Camozzi needle valve? And if so, should I wrap it multiple times or just once?
 

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There is a reg build thread here on TPT. It will tell you all you need to know. If you can't figure it out after reading that then you should buy a built one.

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
 

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Your questions seem realistic for me so here is my spin. First know that I am NOT a paintball user so factor that in!!
First a small bit of word about the techie talk of gas? CGA 320 is a spec put out by the gas association to help get the fittings more standard, at least in the US. CGA 320 refers to the shape of the fitting that normally ties the regulator to the CO2 tank. That is a place where one would normally use the white washer. Maybe the one you mention?
A picture here?
https://www.google.com/search?q=CGA...=q8iCWPbEJc_AjwP4nq_4AQ#imgrc=rHvmBhKDMeBoHM:

For threads and fittings, there is a general rule for things. If there is a washer, etc. to make the seal, no tape or goo is needed. Compressing the washer does the seal. CGA320 to tank is that type.
If there is no seal like where threads are screwed into threads, pipe dope or tape is often needed. Both work the same so it is often personal choice for which you like.
General rule is that the tape needs to be put on somewhat carefully on small fittings around gas where putting it on wrong can let some get cut off and it winds up in the small passage in something. Bad clog and can be hard to fix.
My method? I hold the fitting that I'm putting tape on, in my left hand as I wrap the tape clockwise on the fitting. What this does is let the tape wrap around so that as it is screwed together the tape is pushed tighter rather than unwrapping. Three wraps is my group's standard but that can be different at times if the fitting is one which is extra tight or one wants it to come tight with the parts in a different alignment. Leave some bare space on the forward end of the male fitting so that the tape doesn't get into the works.
Start with three and if the parts wind up tight but not really aligned the way you want, you can take it apart and add more or less to kind of "fudge" things. Three is good for most cases and just don't feel the need to kill it on small brass fittings. They strip easy!
 

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Be sure to clean off any old tape stuck on the threads first (if there is any). Everyone has their own system but here's mine. Be sure to wrap the tape in the right direction. You want the tape to essentially be snugging itself as you tighten and not unraveling. I usually give between 2-3 full wraps that are rather tight. I honestly think many people screw it up when they either a) wrap in wrong direction, b) wrap way too many times, c) wrap very loose.

Good luck. Post back how it goes!

Edit: much more informative post above mine. Beat me to it! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Your questions seem realistic for me so here is my spin. First know that I am NOT a paintball user so factor that in!!
First a small bit of word about the techie talk of gas? CGA 320 is a spec put out by the gas association to help get the fittings more standard, at least in the US. CGA 320 refers to the shape of the fitting that normally ties the regulator to the CO2 tank. That is a place where one would normally use the white washer. Maybe the one you mention?
A picture here?
https://www.google.com/search?q=CGA...=q8iCWPbEJc_AjwP4nq_4AQ#imgrc=rHvmBhKDMeBoHM:

For threads and fittings, there is a general rule for things. If there is a washer, etc. to make the seal, no tape or goo is needed. Compressing the washer does the seal. CGA320 to tank is that type.
If there is no seal like where threads are screwed into threads, pipe dope or tape is often needed. Both work the same so it is often personal choice for which you like.
General rule is that the tape needs to be put on somewhat carefully on small fittings around gas where putting it on wrong can let some get cut off and it winds up in the small passage in something. Bad clog and can be hard to fix.
My method? I hold the fitting that I'm putting tape on, in my left hand as I wrap the tape clockwise on the fitting. What this does is let the tape wrap around so that as it is screwed together the tape is pushed tighter rather than unwrapping. Three wraps is my group's standard but that can be different at times if the fitting is one which is extra tight or one wants it to come tight with the parts in a different alignment. Leave some bare space on the forward end of the male fitting so that the tape doesn't get into the works.
Start with three and if the parts wind up tight but not really aligned the way you want, you can take it apart and add more or less to kind of "fudge" things. Three is good for most cases and just don't feel the need to kill it on small brass fittings. They strip easy!
Be sure to clean off any old tape stuck on the threads first (if there is any). Everyone has their own system but here's mine. Be sure to wrap the tape in the right direction. You want the tape to essentially be snugging itself as you tighten and not unraveling. I usually give between 2-3 full wraps that are rather tight. I honestly think many people screw it up when they either a) wrap in wrong direction, b) wrap way too many times, c) wrap very loose.

Good luck. Post back how it goes!

Edit: much more informative post above mine. Beat me to it! :)
Thanks for your help on this! Exactly what I needed to know.

I just finished checking for leaks using the soap/water method. We'll see how bubble count holds over time.
 

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I ran one of their RFU-483's for several months at one point. Once I dialed in the flow I needed, it never budged and remained leak free.

Nice job!
 

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Very good! I was not up on those parts but I can see better how they fit together. Looks good from here and I would not expect any leaks from what we can see.
Testing is something that I do promote as a really worthwhile thing to do. So many times we tend to rush and when it comes to this job it can cost us in several ways. I got it beat into me that it was worth testing when I ran air pressure on telephone lines where it often required dragging a 50 pound tank out of the truck and across a ditch, etc. to strap it up. It didn't take too many trips back to redo things after leaving a leak for me to really get the idea that the real way to save time was to do it right and test it the first go.
On our tank use it isn't quite such a bummer but not testing still may cost you the full tank of gas as well as the time to go get the thing refilled and doing it all over again! I'm guessing about 20-50% of new users will do this before they get the idea?

A small point that I might have mentioned for tape on small fittings is how short the fitting may be and how large the tape. When we have a fitting, the threads may only be a 1/4 inch long and the tape nearly a 1/2 inch wide. That makes leaving space at the end to be something of a problem. In those cases, it may be worthwhile to cut or tear the tape into strips that fit better. Something of a hassle to split the tape down the middle but still better than doing it wrong and then trying to figure how to get the small bits out of something they clog up? I have tied the tape down to a board and run a razor blade knife down the middle to split it.
Carry on as you seem to be making progress! :thumbsup:
 

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The needle valve is not one I know. How did you happen to find/use that?
Looks interesting and I wanted to check some specs but the Camozzia site can't find that part.
Just curious. Lots of places to find parts that work and I'm always open to new sources.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The needle valve is not one I know. How did you happen to find/use that?
Looks interesting and I wanted to check some specs but the Camozzia site can't find that part.
Just curious. Lots of places to find parts that work and I'm always open to new sources.
The part number is RFO 382-1/8.

It was included with the regulator set-up I bought. The whole set-up is presented as plug and play, but as you saw there was a small amount of assembly required. I'm sure it helps avoid damaging the product during shipping.

Product name is "Advance Camozzi CO2 Speed Flow Controller Regulator MINI-SS with Solenoid" from Aqua-Labs.

You can find it on evilBay as well, where it's sold at a much better price.
 

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This link should work I hope.

http://store.camozzi.co.uk/files//631de562-2404-4c6a-84fd-a49000c331b5/ENG.2.7.20.pdf

I was using them thinking nobody really knew much about them, then stumbled upon a U.K.(I think) site that also mentions/sells them. I think I picked up my last few on eBay for $6/ea shipped...lol

The RFO's are prob more appropriate for us, but I found the RFU's cheaper. I haven't gotten around to testing the 482, but the 483 works good and seemed to hold for over 2 weeks with no (re)adjustment needed. 482/382 should offer better resolution for our needs.

Edit: I'm always a second too late...haha. The response above mine has a link to one of the only places I've seen them in this hobby.

I should have added that after 2 or so weeks I adjusted it because of my changing needs... not due to flow issues.
 

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Hello everyone. I am glad to see you all using Camozzi components as they are certainly the Ferrari of the pneumatics world, just minus the crazy price tag. Certainly the hysteresis of these flow controls beat anyone else. Here's a few points:

-RFU Vs RFO wont really matter much in this application. The difference is that the RFU has a check valve in parallel with the "needle valve". The point of this is to allow the valve to control flow in one direction and allow free flow in the opposite. The only benefit to using an RFO is that it would slow down any water working its way back through the system. This operation should really be mitigated with a check valve but I suppose that it could be an additional feature. So, RFO vs RFU, doesn't matter whatever is easier for you to find.

-The 482 vs 483. Technically the smaller orifice size option (482) would be better for our applications here. However, there may actually be a benefit in using the larger orifice size (483) based on the size of the needle inside. In a nutshell, don't worry about which one you use as they will both be so close in function at that flow rate that it doesn't matter.

-Use Google to find Camozzi datasheets. Google knows all.....

-White Washer. This shouldn't be used with the fittings, that I can see, as it could interfere with the proper sealing of the thread. Does it go inside the female port of the thread adapter or the regultator?

-The nipple fitting with the integrated white o-ring (teflon) is called a sprint thread. You shouldn't be using any thread sealant (thread dope, teflon tape, loctite etc). You should just tighten it finger tight and then give it a 1/4 to 1/2 turn with a wrench. The compression fitting on the left may or may not have a sprint thread.

Here is a link to North American Distributors
 
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