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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My HC was fine the first few days, now it is dying like mad. 50% of it is brown or melted. What do I do?

ADA aqua soil, 15" or so under 110 W lights. High humidity, low water level in soil. Daily multiple mistings.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
How high is humidity

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70% in the air, probably even higher near the medium. There's mold growing too, but only on the driftwood and once the HC turned brown and decays. :(

Should I remove what turns brown or leave it in and hope it sprouts again? I want to fill the tank up with water ASAP but I want the HC to root first so that it won't all float up.
 

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Add a few table spoons of h202 into your spray bottle. I run my humidity at like 85-95

Zero algae or mold issues. I wouldn't spray it every day.

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Add a few table spoons of h202 into your spray bottle. I run my humidity at like 85-95

Zero algae or mold issues. I wouldn't spray it every day.

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Well I already [censored][censored][censored][censored]ed up and killed half of it. It isn't molding and dying, it's just dying and then getting "webby" mold on it... No algae.

Doesn't H2O2 kill plants? I have no algae issue, just mold on the driftwood.

The HC is turning to like a mushy-brown and the roots are dying too. Half of it is green and seems okay...
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
H202 will take care of the mold.

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Humidity is about 87% at the substrate where all the HC is.

I'll mix in some H2O2 I guess...? That won't stop the HC from dying though. It dies, then the mold comes.

I removed the driftwood... I wish I would have just not done a dry start. This is really annoying.
 

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The mold is probably at the roots of the hc and kills it. Then eats it technically. The driftwood was without a doubt the cause.

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They must all have hc for sale. I'll break it down into easy steps for you. Leave the water level 1/4 below the lowest level of substrate in the tank. Add small amounts of hydrogen peroxide to your spray bottle. Keep the humidity to 80-100% . And sit back and relax open it every three days and spray. Hope it gets better for you.

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
First day...


6 days later today...


Turns blackish-brownish...


Then either melts to mush...


Or gets down to roots...


Should I remove the brown junk or what? The dead stuff I mean... In that last pic there's some green. Will other crap come back from the roots? That melting to mush pic probably doesn't even have roots left...
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
If you could see the topography of the tank, that back right corner into the front middle where most of the brown is is a lower elevation by a few inches. The brown behind that big empty spot where the driftwood was is at a higher elevation on a slope.
 

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Well it's not going to grow back. And when you fill it will blast nitrates into the water column. I would remove it. And have some patience zapins Will respond and he knows what he's talking about.

Btw I would have just filled it you had enough hc it was almost a carpet anyways. Also see how dark your hc was that's because you bought it in aquatic form there will be some die off. Most of us aren't that lucky and only can find pots. Its going through a transition from aquatic back to terrestrial right now. I would not fill it in my opinion it would be a sure death sentence for all of it.
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This is almost certainly an opportunistic fungal attack. HC is extremely vulnerable to fungal attack when grown emersed. Infection and damage happens quickly and the fungus is quite aggressive, it will eat your plants and leave sticky piles of digested material behind. If you look closely you'll see thin yellowish spiderweb-like fibers extending from the digested parts, these are the hyphae. Also notice the location of the damaged plants - they form mainly in and around the depressions in the substrate. This is where the substrate is the most wet.

Hyphae:


Fungal infection happens because the conditions are too wet for emersed growth and too dry for submersed growth, the perfect environment for a fungus. So the solution is either to dry out the enclosure more (less misting, lower water level) or submerse the tank and drown out the fungus. The parts that are brown are dead and will not grow back, they have been eaten by the fungus.

Here is a deficiencyfinder article about it with a macro photo: http://deficiencyfinder.com/?page_id=497

Have a look for the hyphae I mentioned to confirm that the issue is fungus.

Also, providing that the issue you have is fungus, I could add your photos to the deficiency finder article I linked above if you give permission? A few more photos would be helpful if you are up for it (some of the ones you posted have a bit of motion blur).
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
This is almost certainly an opportunistic fungal attack. HC is extremely vulnerable to fungal attack when grown emersed. Infection and damage happens quickly and the fungus is quite aggressive, it will eat your plants and leave sticky piles of digested material behind. If you look closely you'll see thin yellowish spiderweb-like fibers extending from the digested parts, these are the hyphae. Also notice the location of the damaged plants - they form mainly in and around the depressions in the substrate. This is where the substrate is the most wet.

Hyphae:


Fungal infection happens because the conditions are too wet for emersed growth and too dry for submersed growth, the perfect environment for a fungus. So the solution is either to dry out the enclosure more (less misting, lower water level) or submerse the tank and drown out the fungus. The parts that are brown are dead and will not grow back, they have been eaten by the fungus.

Here is a deficiencyfinder article about it with a macro photo: http://deficiencyfinder.com/?page_id=497

Have a look for the hyphae I mentioned to confirm that the issue is fungus.

Also, providing that the issue you have is fungus, I could add your photos to the deficiency finder article I linked above if you give permission? A few more photos would be helpful if you are up for it (some of the ones you posted have a bit of motion blur).
If you want you can use them lol... Not much to look at anyway.

So I guess I'll dry the tank up a bit. I wish I could go back and fix this in the first place. I thought filling it would cause the HC to float and make it more troublesome. I ruin everything. ;~;

Thanks for the info!
 
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