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As you could see from @doylecolmdoyle the 100 and 60 will both serve you well. My only difference in opinion is that if you get a fast lens you don't always need a separate flash. Depends on budget the 60 is less than the 100 and is also easier to handhold and walk around with and use as a 'regular' lens. If you said insects I would definitely recommend the 100mm. Both have very good image quality.

Here's a couple taken without a flash.



 

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Yes it is technique, but a fast macro lens is the best chance for sharp well exposed pictures. If your taking full tank shots you don't need a macro. But if you want sharp detail of fish then a macro is your best bet.

These were both taken with the Canon 60mm.



Excellent shots especially with the black background.
 

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I'm not a Canon person so I don't know what is specifically out there for it but a PRIME lens is the way to go. Don't get any additions or zooms or other gimmicks. They just add noise and distortions to the image. The less glass between you and the subject the better. :)


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Excellent shots especially with the black background.
Great pictures and super impressive considering no flash. Is it just you and the camera with no additional equipment? I'm trying to figure out technique now that I have a camera and lens and any tips on how you set up these shots would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
 

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Great pictures and super impressive considering no flash. Is it just you and the camera with no additional equipment? I'm trying to figure out technique now that I have a camera and lens and any tips on how you set up these shots would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
Thanks. Yep just me, camera and lens.

Lens wise having a fast macro lens helps a lot. So you'd want an aperture of at least 2.8 or wider. This allows more light in so you can use a faster shutter. Camera wise if your camera can handle a high ISO seting like 1600/3200/6400 without getting too grainy this again will allow you to use a faster shutter speed to catch a crisp image that isn't too dark.

You'll also want to throw as much light as possible on top of the tank. So the brightest you can make your light or throw another light on it as well, will give you more room to work with in term of the exposure.
 
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