The Planted Tank Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,172 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello. I have algae in my 4 weeks old 40gal long planted tank. Light is total of 120W fluorescent light 1x8000K 1x6500K and 1x3500K bulbs.PH 7.5, Ammonia zero, nitrate zero, Nitrite 1ppm.Stoking 1 betta and 3 otocinclus. Filter Eheim 2215,9W turbo twist UV sterilizer – on for 10h night hours. Light are on for 5h, off for 1h, on again for 5h. DIY chiller constant temperature 77F.CO2 drop meter in yellow range.
I’ll add next week pressured CO2 probably 30-40 bubble per minute through canister.
I need advice what to do in order to remove the algae from plants leafs. Do I have to add some Seachem Flourish-which one or to start with ferts? Thanks a lot in advance
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
A couple of suggestions off the bat would be to reduce your lighting to 1 or 2 bulbs since you are not currently running pressurized CO2. Also, you could try reducing your photo period to 8 hrs.

You also mentioned Nitrites where > 0. If that is the case then I would be very cautious of water quality and perhaps include more frequent water changes till the tank is completely cycled.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,971 Posts
Hello. I have algae in my 4 weeks old 40gal long planted tank. Light is total of 120W fluorescent light 1x8000K 1x6500K and 1x3500K bulbs.

What kind of light bulbs are you using (i.e. T12, T8, T5, T5HO, etc)? 120W, however (regardless of the type of light) would put you at high light. As a result, you should have consistent CO2 as well as a fertilization regime.

nitrate zero, Nitrite 1ppm.Stoking 1 betta and 3 otocinclus.

This is a problem. Your nitrates should not be 0, and your nitrites should be 0. I would carry out some water changes to bring those nitrites down, as your fish are being harmed.

Light are on for 5h, off for 1h, on again for 5h.

As mentioned, I would cut the photoperiod down to 8 hours.

CO2 drop meter in yellow range.
Are you using a 4 dkH reference solution inside the drop checker? If you are using tap water or tank water, this is the incorrect way to use a drop checker.

I’ll add next week pressured CO2 probably 30-40 bubble per minute through canister.
A problem with DIY CO2 is the inconsist CO2 production.

Do I have to add some Seachem Flourish-which one or to start with ferts?
I suggest you do some reading up on EI fertilization. You will need to be dosing nitrates, phosphates and potassium as well as micronutrients in order for your plants to thrive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
199 Posts
sorry Plamski, dont have an answer for ya... but got a similar question for pep that's tryn to help you out. maybe we both can benefit/larn from their answer....

got a 55 gallon w/ med light plants. I'm using cheap shoplight total of 4 (48") 40 watt T-12 Daylight Deluxe form Home Depot. The plants seem to be doing OK, but I'm also growing some similar color algae (not as bad as ur's, but they started to show). I set this lighting up on an old tank bout 2 weeks ago... any ideas?! :confused:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,971 Posts
How long have you had your 55 gallon tank with plants set up for? In a new planted tank, brownish algae is likely diatoms, which is common in new planted tanks.

However in plamski's last picture, the algae could be BBA or it could be diatom algae. I can't really tell from the one picture (my guess is BBA, because it does look a little fuzzy).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
199 Posts
for about 2-3 weeks. Well I had the tank for over 8 years, w/ just gravel & fish. failed growing plants before... giving a send try now. those 4 T-12 (total 160 watts) running 10 hours a day (from 10am - 10pm) just fine gravel for subtrate. I have a HOB(?) Power filter right now, but bout to upgrade to 350 GPH Rena XP3. The algae is not as visible as his, but more like slight browning layer (very thin right now) all over the gravel & around some plants as well... I can post an image if u want... thnx.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,971 Posts
An image would be very helpful.

From what you described, however, it sounds as if you have diatoms. 2-3 weeks is relatively new for a planted tank.

In addition, you do have quite a bit of light over your 55g tank (2.9 WPG). For your tank and the light bulbs you are using, the WPG guideline can be applied quite well (since you are using T12 bulbs). You should look into CO2 injection as well as a fertilization regime.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
199 Posts
thnx a bunch for ya'lls input guys.... I'll try cut off one of da lights and see if that helps.... here's my main concerne. my substrate is only fine gravel, and bit too late to put flourite or other iron/other stuffs plants need. I really dont want to add CO2 in my tank, coz 1. bit worries for my fish. n 2. too much hassle.... question is, what's da best (easy/cheap) way to provide nutritions for my plants w/out having to redo da substrate. and some easy CO2 option for my 55 gal. all without harming/stressing my fish..... any advise appreciated.

plants: Spathiphyllum, Ludwigia (not sure), Rotala SP., Anubias Barteri, Wisteria, Vallisneria Spiralis, Dwarf Hair Grass, Java Fern, Dwarf Baby Tears and 2 types of Moss....

Fish: Angel, Tiger, Gourami etc.

p.s. Will add pic later on tonight... thnx again ya'll.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,971 Posts
I really dont want to add CO2 in my tank, coz 1. bit worries for my fish. n 2. too much hassle....
You should not be that worried about injecting CO2 into your aquarium. It is not really a hassle, especially if you are using pressurized CO2 (which you should be, for a 55g tank). DIY CO2 would be uneconomical for a tank your size.

question is, what's da best (easy/cheap) way to provide nutritions for my plants w/out having to redo da substrate. and some easy CO2 option for my 55 gal. all without harming/stressing my fish..... any advise appreciated.
Have you taken a look at dry fertilizers? They can provide nutrients to the water column for plants.

The easiest CO2 option for your 55g tank is with pressurized CO2. While the initial cost may seem high, it is in the long run, more economical than DIY CO2. Again, as I mentioned, injecting CO2 will not harm/stress your fish out.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,172 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I have 3x 40W T8 over my tank and Eco Complete mixed with black gravel 2:1The tank is 4-5 weeks old but most of the plants are planted 3 weeks ago.
For drop checker I’m using distillate water.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,971 Posts
I have 3x 40W T8 over my tank and Eco Complete mixed with black gravel 2:1The tank is 4-5 weeks old but most of the plants are planted 3 weeks ago.
This seems strange. 4 foot long T8 bulbs are 32W, not 40 watts.

Regardless, as mentioned you do have quite a bit of light over your tank, so you should look into CO2 and also fertilization (both macro and micronutrients). Alternatively, you could decrease your lighting as well.

For drop checker I’m using distillate water.
You should not be using distilled water in your drop checker. By using distilled water (or aquarium water, tap water, etc), your drop checker is not working as it should.

A 4 dkH reference solution must be used in order to have the drop checker working as it is supposed to.

You can purchase 4 dkH reference solutions online, or you can also make your own. Instructions can be found here:

http://www.plantedtank.net/forums/general-planted-tank-discussion/42429-kh-standard-how.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
199 Posts
You should not be that worried about injecting CO2 into your aquarium....
OK, thnx again Darkblade for ur reply.... Knowing CO2 is safe and I find a good place to figure out setup for compressed CO2 (know any good thread here?).... what would be da harm w/out CO2 for my plants?! slow growth??? is it not enough from water/fish... (asking for knowledge sake) :icon_lol:

And not sure what u mean by "dry fertilizers"... but here's what I went n got from PetSmart today.

Seachem "Flourish Tabs" (Gravel Bed Supplement for Planted Aquarium)
Seachem "Flourish" (Comprehensive Supplement for the Planted Aquarium)

is that good enough for my plants??? :icon_mrgr
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
199 Posts
An image would be very helpful.
...
here are some pics. sorry, used my cell phone camera. (cant find SD for my regular cam) will take better one's tomorrow if u need details... thnx.





 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,971 Posts
OK, thnx again Darkblade for ur reply.... Knowing CO2 is safe and I find a good place to figure out setup for compressed CO2 (know any good thread here?)....
This depends on what you wish to do. You can go one of two routes for pressurized CO2. The first is to buy a pre-built regulator (with needle valve, solenoid, etc). This will cost you a bit more, but save you the hassle of looking for parts, and also save you from doing "research."

The second method is to look for the parts yourself. I recommend this route because you will have to do research (thus, allowing you to come to a greater understanding of how CO2 systems work), but also because you can often build a quality pressurized setup for a cheaper price (don't forget that you are paying for labour costs when buying a pre-built regulator). This is especially true if you wait for the best deals to show up on eBay and/or the Swap and Shop forums.

If you plan to build your own regulator, you will need:

Regulator
This controls the delivery of the CO2. It will reduce the tank pressure from 800 PSI to about 30 PSI. There are many different regulators you can look at, such as Victor, Cornelius, Mattheson, Concoa, etc. There are single stage and dual stage regulators. Try to get a dual gauge (note, dual stage is not the same as dual gauge) regulator, so that you can monitor both delivery pressure as well as the CO2 tank pressure (amount of CO2 left in the tank).

Needle/Metering Valve
A good needle/metering valve is your best friend and arguably the most important piece of equipment. The needle/metering valve will reduce the pressure from 30 PSI to a few bubbles per second. Again, you have several brands to choose from including: Clippard, Fabco, Swagelok, and Ideal. The latter 2 are probably the "best" brands (i.e. they are ht most reliable and will not float once they are set).

Solenoid (Optional)
This will allow you to turn off your CO2 automatically via a timer or a pH controller. Some people like to keep their CO2 on all the time, while others use a solenoid to turn it off at night.

Check Valve ("Optional" - see below)
Technically optional, but is required. You don't want water to back siphon and destroy your regulator. Brass ones are better than plastic ones, which will be corroded by the CO2 with time.

Bubble counter (Optional)
Will allow easy monitoring of the CO2 flow rate. You can DIY one yourself if you want.

Drop checker (Optional)
Allows easy monitoring of the amount of CO2 in the aquarium. Again, you can DIY one yourself or purchase one.


what would be da harm w/out CO2 for my plants?! slow growth??? is it not enough from water/fish... (asking for knowledge sake) :icon_lol:
With no CO2, and the light you have, your plants will begin to suffer and then algae will take over. Don't forget that just having lights and CO2 is not enough; you will also need to fertilize (just like you would fertilize your lawn, aquatic plants need to be fertilized; there are specific chemicals for this, see below).

CO2 from fauna alone will not be sufficient to meet the demands of the plants.

And not sure what u mean by "dry fertilizers"... but here's what I went n got from PetSmart today.

Seachem "Flourish Tabs" (Gravel Bed Supplement for Planted Aquarium)
Seachem "Flourish" (Comprehensive Supplement for the Planted Aquarium)

is that good enough for my plants??? :icon_mrgr
The Flourish tabs will serve as supplements that you can push under your gravel. Seachem Flourish is only a micronutrients mix (i.e. it provides the elements that plants require in minimal amounts such as iron, boron, manganese, etc). You will still need to provide macronutrients (i.e. nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium) in some form.

While you can purchase these products from your LFS, they do cost quite a bit of money, and the costs add up quite quickly.

Dry fertilizers are essentially chemicals that you can purchase from your local hydroponic store or online from various sources. Such chemicals include potassium nitrate, potassium sulfate and potassium dihydrogen phosphate. These chemicals will provide the necessary macronutrients that plants require in order to grow. You can also buy good trace mixes (i.e. CSM+B) online as well.

While going this route means you will have to do a little more research, the effort is well worth the savings. 500 grams of potassium nitrate lasts me approximately a year and costs me about $2.20 (I am fertilizing a 90g tank, using the EI regimen).

Edit: Just noticed your pictures.

In your last picture, I cannot be 100% sure of the plant you have there, but it appears to be some kind of foreground plant (HM? HC?). The best way to plant this is to tease apart the individual plantlets and then plant them separately.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
199 Posts
wow my knowledge just quadrupled in few minutes... OK, got da CO2 part.. n think gonna take the easy route (but deff read more in to it)... saw some on ebay, gonna research more though...

fertilizer, still kinda clueless, but gonna read up more on those words. eg. CSM+B, Potassium nitrate, EI regimen... (lol)

yes, those are Dwarf Baby Tears.... I researched a lot bout how to plant those. and best solution was to leave bout 1/4 in of cotton from top, then split the bunch in 6 split, then planted them in the front of da tank. they seem doin OK, in just 1 week (did it later then other plants), they're reaching over and tryn to root on gravel. btw, i tried planting them one by one, but they keep goin straight to da top...

seriously, ur inputs are much appreciated. 1st thing, take one of da light out, 2nd, setup my Rena XP3 canister Filter, 3rd, add CO2, then 4th, fertilizer... thnx a bunch man!!! :icon_mrgr
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
199 Posts
... Such chemicals include potassium nitrate, potassium sulfate and potassium dihydrogen phosphate. These chemicals will provide the necessary macronutrients that plants require in order to grow.....
btw, I was reading fertilizer (one's u mentioned above) wrong amount, or too much messes up waters Nitrate, Nitrite, ammonia and stuffs.... am I close, or making seance??? thnx. :confused:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,971 Posts
btw, I was reading fertilizer (one's u mentioned above) wrong amount, or too much messes up waters Nitrate, Nitrite, ammonia and stuffs.... am I close, or making seance??? thnx. :confused:
Of course, adding the wrong doses of fertilizers can mean that your nitrates go through the roof.

For the chemicals that we use for fertilization purposes, there is no way they can increase ammonia and/or nitrite levels (at least not directly).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,172 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
I bought Milwaukee CO2 Regulator MA957 and 5 LB aluminum cylinder. I'm reading now ferts articles and will buy them Monday. Hopefully we will learn how to use them correctly.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top