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Hello all. Like the title says, I'm having a bit of trouble with my new tank. I had a 15 gallon tall that had a high fish load and a few overgrown Elodea's. I assembled my 46 gallon tank using the gravel from the old tank along with new substrate and about 10 gallons of the old water. (trying to preserve as much bacteria as possible). I also placed the filter media from my old power filter into the new canister filter. I'm using DIY method for CO2 until I get my regulator. (probably a week away)
So I assemble everything last saturday, planted all the plants I had. Elodea, Anubias Nana, Anubias "Coffeefolia", Java Fern, Giant Jungle Vallisneria runners, Narrow leaf swords plantlets, 3 Tiger Lotus plantlets, a couple of sword plants, Hygrophila difformis, Hygrophila polysperma 'Rosanervig', Hygrophila polysperma 'Ceylon' and Hygrophila. Added fish, and dosed with seachem flourish according to bottle directions. (I didn't have any dry ferts yet, which I got in the mail today. Thanks Greg)
Within 2 days I noticed what I think is cyanobacteria. (pictures included) I started on the large piece of lava rock and quickly want to the substrate and some plants.
I tested water today. Ammonia-0, Nitrite-0, Nitrate-0, ph 6.8, Chlorine 0.1, CaCO3-20ppm. It seems that the culpret is the lack of nitrate.
I've done some reading about removing the slime algae by using an antibacterial like E-mycin or the blackout method. Since most of the plants I received in the mail had some frost damage I'd rather not do the blackout method and I've read that using medication is harmful to the bacteria which is still in it's infancy. Are there any other options?
Also, I plan on doing the EI method with this tank. Should I start dosing ferts now or wait a bit? Also, when the tank is cycling should I do the weekly water changes prescribed in the EI? Or do I just let it sit and cycle then start EI?? Thanks for your help!!
 

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I had a bad out break of this a while back, I found the best way to kill it off is water changes. Pick out as much as you can and suck out as much as you can. I also turned my C02 up a bit and the stuff started going away pretty quick.
 

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Eurethromycin (sp?) is said to not affect the nitrosomonas and nitrobacter sp. responsible for keeping your tank stable.

I have used it successfully on my tank with plants and loaches without any ill effects. It got rid of the blue green algae and it's been gone over a month now.

Kara
 

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Eurethromycin (sp?) is said to not affect the nitrosomonas and nitrobacter sp. responsible for keeping your tank stable.

I have used it successfully on my tank with plants and loaches without any ill effects. It got rid of the blue green algae and it's been gone over a month now.

Kara
And that's a lie. It's an antibiotic. It will kill the beneficial bacteria as well. I have seen this happen in non-planted tanks. With a planted tank you have the plants backing you up. I've seen non-planted tanks crash overnight from a single correct dose.
 

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I know that not all the make up of a tanks biological system is congruent with the species and strains of bacteria present but typically

"True nitrifying bacteria are considered to be those belonging to the family NITROBACTERACEAE. These bacteria are strictly aerobic, gram-negative, chemolithic autotrophs. They require oxygen, utilize mostly inorganic (without carbon) compounds as their energy source, and require carbon dioxide (CO2) for their source of carbon. In the case of the Nitrobacteraceae these energy sources are derived from the chemical conversion of ammonia to nitrite, or, nitrite to nitrate."

Auto vs Hetero Bacteria

So given that the main composition of the bacteriological fauna of a tank are gram negative bacteria and....

"erythromycin (irith"rōmī'sin) [key], any of several related antibiotic drugs produced by bacteria of the genus Streptomyces (see antibiotic). Erythromycin is most effective against gram-positive bacteria such as pneumococci, streptococci, and some staphylococci (see Gram's stain). The antibiotic also has some effect on gram-negative bacteria and some fungi. Erythromycin inhibits protein synthesis in susceptible microorganisms. It is used to treat such diseases as pneumonia caused by fungi, and streptococcus and syphilis infections, especially where the patient is allergic to penicillin."

http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/sci/A0817646.html

Then one can conclude that in general the treatment of a tank with erythromycin could damage any gram positive bacteria that are helping your tank along but generally leave gram negative bacteria such as those that keep your tank cycled alone to continue converting toxic ammonia and nitrites.

It could be a crap shoot because you really can't tell what type of bacteria make up your biological system. You just ope that your tank is 'typical'.

Kara
 
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