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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm in the process of building a stand for my 80 gallon tank (48*18) and I'd like to build the stand with legs as opposed to sitting its full length on the floor. That way when the inevitable happens I'll be able to get the water out from underneath and

Has anyone seen a stand like this or a plan of one they can refer me to? I need to something to work from.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Tina, the plan is to still have a closed cabinet, just that it stands on some short legs to allow for cleanup below.
 

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I built a stand with legs using 2x4's and finished with a stain. It was a cheap ,quick solution that doesn;t look half bad.
 

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As long as the legs are short the only problem I see with them are the point loads on the floor. It is one thing to spread 700 pounds across a 6 square foot area of the floor, and quite another to put a quarter of that on a 4 inch square, 4 places under the tank. I'm not so sure I would be willing to try that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hmm, I'm gonna guess the following:

80 gallon tank = 200 lbs
70 gallons water = 585 lbs
stand = 125 lbs
gravel = 150 lbs
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1060 lbs minimum!

1060 lbs/4 legs = 265 lbs per 2*2 leg = 66 psi
1060 lbs/6 legs = 175 lbs per 2*2 leg = 44 psi

empty fridge = 200 lbs
stuff in fridge = 100 lbs

300 lbs / 4 legs = 75 lbs per leg per 1*1 leg = 75 psi

The numbers don't seem alarming to me whatsoever. I know its not common but we also seem to massively overengineer the strength we need in our stands.
 

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I built mine on a set of steel legs from Room and Board <a furniture place online>
I have the enire bottom open. So you ask...where are the guts? They are underneath in the back 25% of the stand, with a piece of black ash in a U shape cloaking it...so the legs stand out and it has an open feel to the whole thing instead of the typical cabinet feel.
I know that ADA has metal leg bases as well....but I chose to do it this way because I have a large steel wall in my place going up the stairs and the two things tie in nicely this way.
 

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I don't thing there is a stand out there that has 100% contact with the floor. Most all of them have an edge where the stand meets the floor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm building a plan that modifies the one I linked to above. I'm not up for doing all the curves surfaces so I'll just straighten them out and go with it.

Next...a canopy that doesn't have a high reach over the front...a real pain in my existing tank...
 

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Hmm, I'm gonna guess the following:

80 gallon tank = 200 lbs
70 gallons water = 585 lbs
stand = 125 lbs
gravel = 150 lbs
______________

1060 lbs minimum!

1060 lbs/4 legs = 265 lbs per 2*2 leg = 66 psi
1060 lbs/6 legs = 175 lbs per 2*2 leg = 44 psi

empty fridge = 200 lbs
stuff in fridge = 100 lbs

300 lbs / 4 legs = 75 lbs per leg per 1*1 leg = 75 psi

The numbers don't seem alarming to me whatsoever. I know its not common but we also seem to massively overengineer the strength we need in our stands.
That is a very convincing argument! I have my tank on the second floor of my condo, and that building was not built with much care. So, the floor squeaks, as a result of some of the plywood subfloor not making much, if any, contact with the floor joists. In other words, the carpenter didn't make sure each piece of plywood actually sat on top of joists at the edges. (I know this because there was only a subfloor there when I bought the condo.) So, I worry that a leg of a heavy piece of furniture might sit where the subfloor isn't supported. But, if I spread that load across even an edge of the stand, a three foot long by one inch area, at least I have a much better chance that it will be supported. Not everyone lives in a poorly constructed house though. I agree that we do tend to overestimate how much strength is needed for our stands.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I agree completely about the competance of the floor! Indeed thats a concern. My 135 gallon is sitting on a load bearing wall across the beams and nothing has moved a fraction of an inch in 6 years. Now, this place was built from heavy properly dried Fir in the 50's so its like a bomb shelter (well not quite).

The new location happens to be sitting only 6 ft above the concrete foundation on a load bearing stub wall. This time its along the length of the beams but I don't think it should be a problem...
 

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I have used a four legged steel DYI stand for several years. The 55 sits on it today. The stand was built for a 40L several years back. I used leveling feet from a Nortel PBX removed during install on each leg. It's on the high side at like 3' up to the bottom of the tank. The tank is 18" high. I'd be happy to send a picture if you like send me a PM...

Basics are the top frame is 1.5" angle iron using 1.5" box section for the legs and I brace. 3/4" bolts were welded into place over drilled caps to ensure I'd be able to use the feet to adjust the stand level no matter what the floor is doing... Spray paint bronze.

My house was built in '49 and it's located in a corner on HW floor... I still need to get under the house and shore up the beam to keep from shaking the tank with foot traffic... Luckily in a low traffic zone of the living room. It's of course on the far side of the house form the crawl space access and I'm not looking forward to dragging a bottle jack and deck footing all that way over there. Seeing Scollys recent post about the Kahuna makes me want to get it done.

But the point load still works with HW floors and the plastic puck feet help tons dispersing the load.

I had to make a skirt to keep the baby out of the HW. I prefer an open frame with HW exposed. But that also has it's problems with light getting to the hoses it causes some added growth of gunk. :)
 
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